Vids I Dig 375: Whang!: WWE Attitude Era Censorship

Taken from Justin Whang’s YouTube description: During the late 90s, WWF’s programming grew more mature with the Attitude Era. Although this greatly improved ratings, it drew the attention of the Parents Television Council, an organization that would try to get their advertisers to leave through a letter writing campaign. It backfired spectacularly.

Vids I Dig 367: Chris Van Vliet: Bubba Ray Dudley Interview

From Chris Van Vliet’s YouTube description: Bully Ray (Bubba Ray Dudley) chats with Chris Van Vliet from his home in New York and they cover absolutely everything from his almost 30 year wrestling career. He talks about starting out in ECW with a character that wasn’t set up for success, pitching the idea to Paul Heyman of teaming with D-Von to form the Dudley Boyz, being part of the first TLC match in WWE, what his favorite TLC match was, putting Mae Young through a table, leaving WWE and going to TNA as Team 3-D, breaking away from D-Von to have a singles career that led to him becoming the 2-time TNA World Champion, the idea he had for the finish of the Sting vs. Jeff Hardy match at Victory Road 2011, Eric Bischoff coming up with the idea for him to be the leader of the Aces and Eights, his thoughts on Moose as the TNA Champion, Tessa Blanchard as the Impact Wrestling World Champion, which one of them he’d rather have a match with, his future plans and much, much more!

Video Game Review: WWE 2K19 (PlayStation 4)

It’s 2020, so why am I reviewing WWE 2K19? Well, I only buy the WWE 2K games every few years, as much doesn’t change from game-to-game with each release. But since 2K20 has become legendary for the amount of glitches and bugs it has, I went backwards a year to get a less problematic version.

I didn’t expect much from the game, as these things tend to have really limited shelf lives and because of that, I don’t typically review sports games. However, this had a few bells and whistles that didn’t exist in the previous versions I’ve owned and it’s those bells and whistles that make this one worth talking about.

The most important thing that this game has is the Community Creations option. While the “create-a-wrestler” feature has always been a staple in these games and wrestling games in general, going back to the late ’90s, now you don’t have to create anything, you can just download other people’s creations and add them to your game.

So in no time, I had a roster of 100 extra wrestlers from the ’70s and ’80s and started some old school wrestling shows within the WWE Universe gameplay mode. Sadly, the game caps you at 100 created wrestlers but it still provides you with a load of options and a new, massive roster to exploit.

Overall, the ability to create shows, a unique pay-per-view schedule and also download just about every arena/wrestling pay-per-view from history is a damn cool feature.

As far as the gameplay goes, it’s about the same as these games have been over the last several years. There are a few improvements like in the submission wrestling aspect of the game. However, there are still problems with it and the pacing of matches is terrible for the most part. Sure, some settings can be adjusted to improve this but it doesn’t give it a natural, genuine feel.

I’ve played the shit out of this version of WWE 2K but it’s still a far from perfect game. The only thing that keeps me coming back is the ability to play in the classic NWA, Mid-South, Memphis, Florida and ECW settings with those classic stars. I’ve also dabbled with ROH, AEW, CMLL, AAA, NJPW, AJPW and FMW settings and characters but the game only really allows you to create six weekly shows and four pay-per-views per month.

Otherwise, I may have played this for about a week and moved on.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: other modern wrestling games but there really aren’t many.

Documentary Review: Rock-n-Roll Never Dies: The Story of the Rock-n-Roll Express (2015)

Release Date: 2015
Directed by: Michael Elliot
Cast: Ricky Morton, Robert Gibson, Jim Cornette, various

EllBow Productions, Highspots, 117 Minutes

Review:

Watching this documentary, it kind of dawned on my that I have seen the Rock-n-Roll Express wrestle live and in person over five consecutive decades. I saw them in the ’80s, ’90s, ’00s, ’10s and the ’20s after recently seeing them at NWA Hard Times back in January before this COVID spectacle put the dead stop halt on Planet Earth.

While they’ve never been my all-time favorite tag team, they are certainly pretty high up on my list and have my respect for their contributions and longevity in the wrestling business. Hell, these guys can still go and they’ve proved that the two most recent times where I was able to see them.

So I was pretty stoked when I got this three disc set, which featured the documentary I’m now reviewing, as well as two other discs packed full of bonus material, interviews and matches.

As far as the documentary goes, it was a good, solid piece that covered these guys’ long and storied careers. It even goes back to the time before they were a team, showing how each man developed their style and how they eventually came together, forever changing the business and the tag team landscape.

So many other great teams have been inspired by the pairing of Ricky Morton and Robert Gibson and their effect is still felt today, even with the younger generation of wrestlers we have now, who are two-to-three generations removed from the height of the Rock-n-Roll Express’ career.

The best part about this piece, is hearing the stories that Ricky and Robert got to share about their history, as well as their takes on the business then and now.

Old school wrestling fans, especially those who loved the greatest tag team era, should thoroughly enjoy this.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other wrestling documentaries by EllBoy Productions and put out by Highspots.