Comic Review: Deathstroke: The Terminator, Issues #35-40

Published: 1994
Written by: Marv Wolfman
Art by: Launchland Pelle, Nigel Tully, Jaxon Renick, Ed Hannigan, Will Blyberg, Charles Barnett, Rus Silver

DC Comics, 151 Pages

Review:

They stopped releasing the Deathstroke: The Terminator series in collected volumes, so I figured I’d still finish out the series, reviewing a handful of issues apiece until I reach the end, which happens at issue 60.

This stretch of the series is pretty significant in that it features the first meeting between Deathstroke and Green Arrow. I guess the importance of that depends on how much you were into Arrow over the first few seasons. For those of us who watched it, as it was pretty great its first two years, we know how much these characters mean to one another in the CW television universe.

In the comics, they never cross paths as much but it is still cool to see the stories where they do, as opposed to just seeing Deathstroke run into Batman, Nightwing or the Titans for the umpteenth time.

Apart from the pretty cool Green Arrow encounter, this is basically a series of one-off issues. Granted, they are connected and form a larger, ongoing arc but the stories are written and presented so that if you just happen to pick up one issue, you can enjoy it without all the extra context. And honestly, that’s a thing I miss in comics.

Marv Wolfman continues to tell good, engaging stories, here. However, Deathstroke is his creation and he knows the character better than anyone else. I’m actually impressed and happy that Wolfman was still writing this series this deep into it and well over a decade after creating the character in the pages of The New Teen Titans.

This also features more of the Pat Trayce version of the Vigilante character, which I’m starting to appreciate as much as the original version. I think the Adrian Chase one is still my favorite because I loved his original comic series and it’s going to be hard to take his spot because of that series.

So this was just more quality Deathstroke but I think as long as Wolfman is helming the series, I should expect solid results.

Rating: 8/10

Comic Review: Deathstroke: The Terminator, Vol. 5: World Tour

Published: January 22nd, 2019
Written by: Marv Wolfman
Art by: Steve Erwin

DC Comics, 237 Pages

Review:

Man, I really love this series outside of the weird third volume. I’m glad that it recovered from that chapter and this one is actually a bit better than the previous one.

Marv Wolfman really knows Slade Wilson a.k.a. Deathstroke but then he should, as he created the character a decade before this series.

I love this in the same way I love the earliest G.I. Joe stories by Larry Hama. It has that same sort of gravitas and machismo while also featuring badass characters outside of just the main one.

With this series, I’ve become a much bigger fan of the Pat Trayce version of Vigilante than the original version. She looks great in the costume, is a complex, solid character and it’s extremely hard not to like her, even if she sometimes acts too reactionary and doesn’t trust Deathstroke, the man she unfortunately loves but who is also, in this era, trying to do good things and atone for his sins.

I love Deathstroke and Vigilante’s relationship, though, as they are usually allies but often times in each other’s crosshairs. Wolfman writes these characters and these stories so well, however, that it just works and makes sense.

Like most of the previous volumes I also really enjoy the art in this.

I guess this volume is probably the most important one in the series, thus far, as it shows a bridge finally being built between Slade and his ex-wife, who still wants him dead due to his part in their sons’ deaths.

This volume also takes Deathstroke around the globe and just about every single issue collected here has him somewhere else. That reminded me a lot of G.I. Joe, as well.

I really dug the hell out of this volume and that should come as no surprise if you’ve read my other reviews of this series.

Sadly, there isn’t a volume six but the series continued on beyond this. I’m not sure how I will review the rest of the run but I may just read everything that’s left and review it as one big batch of issues.

Rating: 8.75/10
Pairs well with: the other volumes in the original Deathstroke: The Terminator series from 1991 to 1996.

Comic Review: Deathstroke: The Terminator, Vol. 4: Crash or Burn

Published: May 15th, 2018
Written by: Steven Grant, Len Wein, Marv Wolfman
Art by: Will Blyberg, Steve Erwin, Gabriel Morrissette

DC Comics, 196 Pages

Review:

The last volume of Deathstroke: The Terminator really took the wind out of my sails. However, this chapter in the series was a return to form.

This gets back to being a little smaller in scale and more like a street level story, which is where I like my Deathstroke stories to be. I don’t mind them getting somewhat grandiose but the third volume was too over-the-top and crammed full of ’90s comic book cliches.

Here, we see the Pat Trayce version of the Vigilante come back into the story and I didn’t realize how much I liked her until she was absent from the last installment.

This also felt fresh and I think a lot of that had to do with the writing. While Deathstroke is Marv Wolfman’s creation, we also got scripts from the great Len Wein, as well as Steven Grant. These two kept things pretty consistent with the better parts of the Deathstroke series, thus far. They understood the character, the tone and also did a superb job with not just Deathstroke but the other core characters, as well.

I also really liked the art and while it has been good since this series started, it stood out to me a bit more here. Although, some of the new one-off characters looked a bit wonky. But, it was the ’90s and new comic book characters often times looked goofy for the sake of unrestrained edginess.

In the end, this reinvigorated my love of this series and I can’t wait to get into volume five.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: the other volumes in the original Deathstroke: The Terminator series from 1991 to 1996.

Comic Review: Deathstroke: The Terminator, Vol. 2: Sympathy For the Devil

Published: December 29th, 2015
Written by: Marv Wolfman, Dan Jurgens
Art by: Steve Erwin, Dan Jurgens, George Perez

DC Comics, 190 Pages

Review:

I loved the first volume of this series but crazily enough, I found this one to be even a wee bit better, as the story of Deathstroke takes shape and becomes more fleshed out, allowing him to evolve beyond just a simple anti-hero that looks cool and shows up once in awhile in other characters’ books.

This also spends some time on developing Pat Trayce, another version of the Vigilante character. While I wasn’t totally sold on her, I really grew to like her in this volume and I hope her run as a character and a major part of this series isn’t short-lived. I know that she’s pretty much been nonexistent since this series in the early ’90s but I don’t know her fate and don’t want it spoiled. I just hope she isn’t killed off before she really comes into her own.

This volume collects a few stories but the one I liked most had to deal with Deathstroke accidentally hurting Lois Lane’s sister, which brought out Superman and opened up the story to show us the personal relationship that Deathstroke had with Lois’ father, an ally during his time at war.

We also see Deathstroke face off against some of the Justice League while Nightwing also gets involved towards the end of this volume.

This volume really solidified Wintergreen as one of my favorite minor DC characters. He’s essentially Deathstroke’s Alfred and while I’ve always seen him that way, this collection of issues really made me appreciate him and the two men’s relationship a lot more than I already did.

All in all, this was superb. Now on to volume three!

Rating: 9.25/10
Pairs well with: the other volumes in the original Deathstroke: The Terminator series from 1991 to 1996.

Comic Review: Deathstroke: The Terminator, Vol. 1: Assassins

Published: April 14th, 2015
Written by: Marv Wolfman
Art by: Will Blyberg, Steve Erwin

DC Comics, 264 Pages

Review:

I became a fan of Deathstroke back in the ’80s and early ’90s when I’d see him appear in The New Teen Titans comics. Deathstroke being in a story was a guaranteed sale for DC, as far as my wallet was concerned.

However, I never really read his original solo series from the beginning. I’d pick up issues, here and there, but for some reason I slept on it. That could also be due to it being a bit harder to find, as it wasn’t typically available in convenient stores and sometimes the comic book shops were out before I could get there on my bicycle on Saturday afternoons.

Being that this was written by Marv Wolfman, the character’s creator, is a really big selling point. I didn’t understand the importance of that in 1991, as I was more into artists over writers. Granted, that would shift, as I started recognizing names and then figuring out certain writers’ track records.

This series really starts off by portraying Deathstroke as an anti-hero trying to absolve the guilt he feels after having killed his son. This ties directly to those issues and showcases his rough relationship with his ex-wife, the mother of his dead son.

Beyond that, this shows that Deathstroke is developing a moral code where he’ll still do mercenary jobs and kill scumbags but he won’t just take any job or kill anyone. Early on, Deathstroke refuses a job and with that, he deals with the consequences of pissing off that potential customer.

Additionally, this features another big story arc that sees Deathstroke and Batman at odds but then finding common ground in order to stop the real threat that has descended upon Gotham City. In that story, we’re also introduced to Pat Trayce, who becomes a new version of the Vigilante character and teams up with Deathstroke.

Beyond the solid storytelling, the art in this is really good and frankly, it made me miss this era, as this came out in a time where I really started buying comic books on a weekly basis and was so inspired that some friends and I started our own comic book company to sell our characters’ stories to other middle school kids.

This was awesome and I’m glad that I hadn’t yet read it and get to experience it as something new. What’s really great about that is that I now have a deeper appreciation for this than I would have back in the day.

I can’t wait to jump into the other volumes.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: the other volumes in the original Deathstroke: The Terminator series from 1991 to 1996.