Documentary Review: Jack of All Trades (2018)

Release Date: March 3rd, 2018 (Cinequest Festival)
Directed by: Harvey Glazer, Stuart Stone
Written by: Stuart Stone
Music by: John Stuart Newman, Jamie Rise, Stuart Stone
Cast: Stuart Stone, Harvey Glazer, Adam Rodness, Jose Canseco, Karie Stone

5’7 Films, R2-G2, 85 Minutes

Review:

I have loved collecting since I was a little kid in the ’80s buying up sports cards, comics and all sorts of other things. So this documentary about the baseball card hobby was something I wanted to check out.

This is more than that though, as it follows a guy whose love of baseball collecting came from his father. As the story picks up, it has been over twenty-five years since the guy’s father walked out on his family.

Initially, this is about examining the once massive baseball card industry and how all the cards ’80s and ’90s kids saved are pretty much worthless. But by the end, it is about a guy confronting his father and trying to find peace.

Overall, this is a good, engaging documentary. It really delves into baseball card collecting and also has some interviews with people from Topps and Upper Deck, as well as Jose Canseco and a guy with more baseball cards than anyone else in existence.

However, the very human story between the son and his father takes over. But that’s actually what is unique and cool about this film.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other documentaries about collecting, hobbies or nerdom.

Book Review: ‘Garbage Pail Kids’ by The Topps Company

For ’80s kids that want to feel nostalgic, this is a damn cool book to thumb through.

However, if you wanted a real book about the history of Garbage Pail Kids and the larger story behind them, this doesn’t have much.

The book has a fantastic introduction written by legend Art Spiegelman, who was an instrumental part of this brand’s creation. He delves into the backstory but there is only so much you can fit within a five page introduction.

There is also a solid afterword by John Pound but it’s also rather short and kind of just lets you peek behind the scenes a little bit.

This is really just an art book and that’s actually totally fine. I just wish there was more story and history presented.

Ninety percent of the book is Garbage Pail Kids art, presented in order over the course of the first five series that were released. However, there are so many more cards that were great and came later. In fact, these cards went on to produce fifteen series in their original run, as well as some spinoffs, larger cards and a few attempts at being resurrected over the years.

Maybe Topps will release future editions and eventually showcase all the art in a larger, nicer format.

I wouldn’t quite call this a must own for fans but it is still a worthwhile book to pick up if you enjoy the art and want to take a trip down memory lane.

Plus, Spiegelman and Pound’s words made for a good read.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other books Topps has put out regarding their products from the past.