Comic Review: Man Without Fear

Published: January 2nd, 2019 – January 30th, 2019
Written by: Jed MacKay
Art by: various, Kyle Hotz (covers)

Marvel Comics, 123 Pages

Review:

I was a bit depressed when Charles Soule’s run on Daredevil came to an end but there was a silver lining as Chip Zdarsky would be taking over. Zdarsky has been on his A-game lately and I think that he’ll be a good fit on the title.

However, between the two runs, there was this miniseries, which is a bridge between them.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this five issue series but even though it started out a bit slow, each issue built off of the one before it and I was pleasantly surprised by the end result.

This starts with Matt Murdock a.k.a. Daredevil in a coma. Each issue sees a character or a group of characters from his past come into his hospital room to visit but to also add some good emotional context to what Matt is going through. By the end of it, he is ready to put the mask back on and get to work.

The story was a slow build but man, it worked really well and it did it’s primary job very effectively. That job was to bridge the gap and generate real interest in the next chapter of Daredevil‘s long legacy.

Several artists worked on the book but the art was all done pretty consistently. The covers by Kyle Hotz really made these books look superb and I picked them all up because sometimes I buy comics just for the art on the cover. But I’m glad that this wasn’t just a collection of nice covers and that the contents within entertained me.

There isn’t a whole lot of action here due to Daredevil’s physical status but the story does have real energy and we do get to see Matt subconsciously fight his demons in a physical sense.

Man Without Fear is definitely a Daredevil story worth reading for fans of the character and for those looking forward to what’s on the horizon.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: the Charles Soule Daredevil run before this and the new Chip Zdarsky run after.

Comic Review: Spider-Men II

Published: March 21st, 2018
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Sara Pichelli

Marvel Comics, 104 Pages

Review:

I had really enjoyed Brian Michael Bendis’ run with the Miles Morales version of Spider-Man since he debuted. I also liked the first Spider-Men event, which brought Miles and Peter Parker together for the first time. So I had pretty high hopes for this sequel series and Bendis’ swansong before leaving Marvel for DC Comics.

Sadly, this was a letdown.

Now it wasn’t terrible but it was just okay. But this should have maintained the momentum and the energy that the previous Miles Morales stories had.

Ultimately, Spider-Men II took the wind out of the sails and brought this once fun to read character back down to Earth in the most Brian Michael Bendis way possible. And I don’t say that to be trendy and trash Bendis’ work like so many others but this is a prime example of what his harsher critics can point to and say, “See, Bendis gonna Bendis!”

This tried to be clever and give fans a swerve with an alternate, darker version of Miles Morales but it fell flat. In the end, the story was a total dud, lacking in a healthy amount of action and any sort of depth or solid character development. It read more like a love letter between “evil” Miles and the Kingpin than something worthy of bringing the two most popular Spider-Men together again.

Miles Morales debuted with a hell of a bang. But for Bendis’ last story for the great character he created, Miles went out with a whimper.

But hey, Sara Pichelli’s art was absolutely top notch, beautiful and up to her great standard. So, at least I got to enjoy the overall look of this book.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Miles Morales stories by Brian Michael Bendis but they’re all better than this one.

Comic Review: Marvel Knights 20th

Published: November 7th, 2018 – January 30th, 2019
Written by: Donny Cates, Tini Howard, Vita Ayala, Matt Rosenberg
Art by: various

Marvel Comics, 161 Pages

Review:

When the Marvel Knights line of comics were going strong, I wasn’t paying much attention. I was aware of them but it was the late ’90s and I wasn’t reading comic books as regularly, as I was entering my twenties and didn’t do much other than party hard and sleep little.

I have since gone back and read some of the stories from that alternate Marvel universe and I’ve liked a lot of them. So when I saw that this was coming out to commemorate the 20th anniversary, I had to check it out. Plus, one of the writers is Donny Cates, whose recent work I’ve loved and it heavily features Daredevil.

The premise was kind of cool and I did enjoy this overall. Although, it was problematic in regards to its pacing. This is due to there being too many writers chiming in over the six issues. Cates looked to be credited as the top writer for each chapter but he had different collaborators with each new installment of this miniseries.

The narrative flow was a bit off, as it took too long to get the action going. Once we get to where this needed to wrap up, it felt rushed and the twist finale seemed strange, out of place and too convenient.

There’s a MacGuffin device and all they have to do in the end is hit a button and fix everything. I love Cates but that’s just lazy, outdated 1960s comic book writing. It’s like a random wizard showing up at the end and casting a “fix it” spell, making everything that happened pretty pointless.

I was still glad that I read through this miniseries, as it featured a lot of characters I love. I can’t call it underwhelming but I did have expectations that I don’t feel were met.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: old school Marvel Knights stuff and other recent works by Donny Cates.

Comic Review: Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Vol. 2: Revelations

Published: June 10th, 2015
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Dave Marquez

Marvel Comics, 145 Pages

Review:

This picked up right where the previous volume left off, which was good as volume one ended on a cliffhanger and didn’t closeout the story arc of Miles Morales and Peter Parker against the Green Goblin.

However, that arc does actually end in the first third of this collection and then we go right into two smaller arcs, which makes this volume less cohesive and consistent than the previous one.

This is still really good, however, it just felt like it wrapped up the Goblin stuff pretty abruptly and then the other two stories felt rushed due to how drawn out the Goblin plot was.

Miles finds himself in some serious trouble here, as his girlfriend is not who she seems. Also, his father returns with secrets that redefine Miles’ world.

Overall, this is a great collection of issues that develop Miles’ character and give him a lot more drama to contend with. This is where he really has to start growing up in an effort to become a man and a true hero.

That being said, it’s not the most entertaining chapter in Miles’ long story but it is maybe the most important.

Ultimately, this is still a good, fun read and I’m still on board with Miles’ journey.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: The other early Mile Morales Spider-Man stories. Also, Spider-Men I and II and Spider-Verse.

Comic Review: The Death of Daredevil

Published: October 17th, 2018 – November 28th, 2018
Written by: Charles Soule
Art by: Phil Noto

Marvel Comics, 112 Pages

Review:

This story takes place over Daredevil issues 609 through 612 and marks the end of Charles Soule’s run. And while I’m anticipating new blood taking over the writing duties for this series, I have mostly enjoyed Soule’s work.

So it’s hard to talk about this story without spoiling it. So if you want to go into it blind, why are you reading a review for it anyway? Just scroll down now and see the rating.

The title of this alludes to Daredevil meeting his demise. However, there is a twist to that, which I have to admit, I didn’t see coming even though their were some obvious pieces laid out in this arc and the one before it.

Wilson Fisk a.k.a. the Kingpin is still mayor of New York, Daredevil, as a hero and a lawyer, has tried to push back and expose Fisk for the criminal that everyone, even those who voted for him, already know he is.

That being said, this story is the end of an era for both Daredevil and Kingpin. I won’t say what happened but the seeds have been planted for great change going forward on all fronts.

This also had brief cameos from some of the key Avengers in a court room scene, as well as a run in with Bullseye and some other well-known villains along the way. We also get the debut of a new villain named Vigil, who looks cool as hell but as this story unfolds, leaves me wondering if he’d even show up again.

The story was pretty good but I’m just not a fan of the art style. I know it’s appealing to some but it just lacks energy. I hope Daredevil gets back to a grittier and almost pulpy neo-noir feel once the new team takes over.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Charles Soule story arcs on Daredevil that lead up to this finale.

Comic Review: Daredevil, Issues #254-256 – First Appearance of Typhoid Mary

Published: May, 1988 – July, 1988
Written by: Ann Nocenti
Art by: John Romita Jr., Al Williamson

Marvel Comics, 70 Pages

Review:

Everyone loves Frank Miller’s run on Daredevil. However, when I discovered the character, Miller had already moved on. It didn’t matter though, because I loved the stories so much that I picked this up nearly every month.

I came into this during the long Ann Nocenti run. I didn’t have the appreciation for it, at the time. I just liked Daredevil and everything that came with it.

Now, as a cultured adult, I understand what I love most about this era.

First, it’s Nocenti’s writing. She did some great things with all the key characters and really built off of what Frank Miller did before her. If I can be so bold, I think she improved upon it greatly and her run on the title is my favorite out of all the creators who have touched this character.

Second, the artwork of John Romita Jr. is incredible. I have always loved his style and he was the perfect artist for Nocenti’s Daredevil.

The three issues I’m reviewing here are pretty important, as this is the first appearance, origin and story arc for one of the best Daredevil villains, Typhoid Mary.

In recent years, I feel like Mary hasn’t been utilized well. Going back in time, reading this, and seeing how she was in the beginning was refreshing. I’ve always loved the character, more so than Elektra, and felt like she was a good foil with a romantic twist for the hero.

Here, she is just so sinister and the Romita art gives her so much life. She’s never looked cooler or more badass than she did when Romita was drawing her.

Overall, the story is also really good. I love how she comes into the plot, how the Kingpin brings her into the fold and how it all plays out, as she is on a mission to destroy Matt Murdock once and for all. And she doesn’t even want the money, she just thinks that ruining his life would be fun.

The story is dark, satisfying and a great example of how the team of Nocenti and Romita were one of the best in the late ’80s.

Once I start filling in some holes in my Daredevil collection, I’ll do more reviews of Nocenti stories.

Rating: 9.25/10
Pairs well with: anything from the great Ann Nocenti run on Daredevil.

Talking Pulp: Why I’ve Grown to Hate Deadpool

If the title of this article is fightin’ words, then prepare for 1485 more.

I’ve come to the realization that I just don’t like Deadpool. I mean, I used to love him back when Rob Liefeld created him and he was a thorn in the New Mutants and X-Force’s side from time to time. Plus, I was twelve years-old.

But what’s not to like?

He’s pretty much a ninja or at least, he looks like the bastard lovechild of a ninja and Spider-Man. He was also snarky and a pain in the ass. He even wore a badass red outfit with badass swords and badass guns. He had lots of pouches… so many pouches.

However, as much as I enjoyed seeing him pop up in stuff, I never really liked it when he had his own solo comics.

Okay, I did like those first few miniseries that he had because he still wasn’t quite the Deadpool that we would eventually get and I actually loved the bromance between villains Black Tom Cassidy and Juggernaut. But Deadpool would go on to change and he would also go on to have a villain problem.

Let me get to how he changed first.

In 1997, Joe Kelly came along and wrote an ongoing series for Deadpool. It was here where the character’s real super power debuted: the ability to break the fourth wall. This would continue to be a trait that Deadpool would have going into the future. Without Joe Kelly, Deadpool wouldn’t be talking to you and me, the audience, during his movies. Kelly, essentially turned the “Merc with a Mouth” into Zack Morris from Saved by the Bell. It was unique and fun at first but as time rolled on, I personally found it more distracting than amusing. But I also prefer tough looking characters that kick a whole lot of ass to spend less time chatting and more time kicking a whole lot of ass.

But really, breaking the fourth wall is not a super power. And neither is talking and being a snarky jackass.

Deadpool’s actual power is pretty much just a super healing ability, which makes him Wolverine without the claws, cool skeleton and good looks. And since Wolverine speaks softly and carries a big can of whoop ass into every situation, I will always prefer Wolverine.

Wolverine is a man’s man where Deadpool is that awkward thirty-something juvenile guy that shows up at parties, makes a fuck ton of jokes and people just leave the room. And then he follows them around making more jokes, oblivious to the fact that his routine is stale and he can’t converse like a normal, well adjusted adult.

I’m not saying that he’s completely unfunny but there comes a time when you need to nut the fuck up and shut the fuck up. This is why Deadpool is amusing from time to time when he cameos in someone else’s comic but to read 30 pages of his shtick, every single month, doesn’t interest me in the slightest. Point being, he’s a character that is much better and more welcomed in smaller doses.

Now circling back to the villain problem, Deadpool just doesn’t have any that are worthwhile. This is really apparent in his movies. Sure, Juggernaut and Black Tom show up in Deadpool 2 but they aren’t a main focus and are really just afterthoughts in the film.

Deadpool typically goes after one-off scumbags. I guess that’s fine if you only read Deadpool for Deadpool but for the rest of us, we want to see him actually face off with credible threats. Comic stories of Deadpool cracking jokes, leading up to killing a random mob boss have been done to death at this point. Lack of good villains is why I’ve never been a huge fan of the Punisher in his own titles either. I prefer the Punisher when he actually goes against Jigsaw or the Kingpin, as opposed to a random Russian sex trafficker.

The times where I do love Deadpool is when he is a real fish out of water and playing against his typical situation. For instance, whenever he’s trying to court Death and drawing the ire of Thanos. Or in Venomverse when he’s one of a few dozen characters but he finds a way to be more than his one-dimensional self and stands out while adding something worthwhile to the story beyond just comedic relief. I just don’t want Wade Wilson to be to Marvel what Santino Marella was to the WWE for several years. But he’s basically Marvel’s Jerry Lewis. A lot of people liked Jerry Lewis but a lot of people also post Onion stories like they’re real news… still.

Getting back to his humor, what is it mostly comprised of? Sex jokes and chimichangas.

A good sex joke can go a long way but when you’re writing a character that’s in comics for teens, there is only so far that you can go. And really, while this does work for a juvenile audience, the humor is still juvenile and who hasn’t heard these tired ass jokes for years already? Well, assuming you’re older than high school age.

Chimichangas are just delicious deep fried burritos. I guess it’s a funny sounding word but how many jokes can you make centered around chimichangas? Apparently, at this point, over twenty years worth strung over multiple creative mediums. You know that meme of the cartoon taco that says, “I don’t wanna taco ’bout it?” Now imagine someone holding that in your face for twenty-plus years.

Another aspect of Deadpool’s humor is pop culture references. He runs off at the mouth referencing movies, video games, bands and everything else like it’s the final battle in Ready Player One. He’s like Marvel’s equivalent to Family Guy, which I guess a lot of people like but I don’t see the humor in just mentioning some past nerdy thing. Actually, doesn’t that make Deadpool The Big Bang Theory of the Marvel universe then?

When it comes to the comics themselves, looking beyond his humor style, the stories are typically a jumbled up clusterfuck. Everything beyond his dialogue is wacky for wacky’s sake. It’s like reading a Sunday paper comic strip that is stretched from a few panels to 30 pages worth of panels. And nothing in his stories ever seem to hold much bearing over the bigger picture. It’s like every story could just be his own delusional power fantasy where he’s the only one laughing at his jokes.

Additionally, what’s the fucking point of it all? Where is he going as a character? Is he even a character that has the elements that a character should have? What’s his life arc? It’s just a long running aimless joke. Thankfully, the films fleshed him out into something actually tangible with real human emotion but I think that Ryan Reynolds and the writers were smart enough to know that the film wouldn’t succeed as a two hour dick joke. People need to connect to something and Deadpool, in comic book form, doesn’t have anything to connect to. He probably doesn’t connect to you either unless you’re just a basic bitch that thinks Semi-Pro is a better film than The Shawshank Redemption.

Looking back to the beginning at what Deadpool was, as a character, he’s just Rob Liefeld’s attempt at parodying Deathstroke. He was also purposely given a look that is reminiscent of Spider-Man. Deadpool has never been anywhere near as interesting as either of those characters though. Seriously, read Deathstroke by Christopher Priest (the current run of the character) or go back and read Teen Titans: The Judas Contract. Deadpool has never had a story arc anywhere near the quality of Deathstroke. And I don’t even need to compare him to the incredible history of the Peter Parker version of Spider-Man.

Other things to nitpick about is that the character has a terrible origin story, the art in his books is usually mediocre, he’s an amalgamation of ’90s cliches that people have made fun of for years, all he cares about is amusing himself at anyone else’s expense, he’s a prick most of the time, he’s barely heroic, he fucks up constantly and we’re supposed to laugh about it because he’s a Mary Sue that can survive anything, he’s usually in the way when other heroes are present and he relies on his healing ability over honing his actual skills.

I used to love Deadpool. But again, I was twelve years-old. I never cared about his own solo books because I guess I never thought he had much to offer outside of quick appearances. But as time moved on, the gimmick ran tired and Deadpool became the Dane Cook of comic books.

Plus, when someone says that he’s their favorite superhero, chances are they didn’t know who the hell he was until three years ago… and they probably don’t read comic books either.