Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 4: Sins of the Fathers

Published: February 6th, 2013
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Andy Kuhn
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 122 Pages

Review:

This series has been on a really good trajectory, thus far. The first three volumes covered a lot of ground with great, energetic, action-packed stories. So I guess eventually, you’d have to reach a slower chapter and this is it.

That’s not to say that this is boring or that it’s not up to snuff, it just spends a bit more time on fleshing out some characters and this version of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles mythos.

A breather also felt needed, as the story could’ve easily gotten away from itself if it stayed primarily focused on action and having to make the characters fight too much.

This also started to give General Krang and his species some backstory, which we hadn’t gotten up to this point. His relationship with Baxter Stockman is pretty interesting and it’s developing and evolving while really painting the picture that this version of Krang is truly dangerous and not the buffoon people are mostly familiar with from the original cartoon series.

There is also a good moment in this between Splinter and Raphael, as Raph learns an important lesson. But that lesson also leads to Casey Jones essentially becoming the Turtles’ roommate.

I was pretty happy with this volume, I truly dig this series and I can’t wait to keep reading through it.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 3: Shadows of the Past

Published: September 26th, 2012
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Dan Duncan
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 105 Pages

Review:

Does this series keep improving with every volume? Why, yes it does!

So far, this was my favorite release in the collected trade paperback versions of IDW’s rebooted Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series.

My only real complaint about these is that I feel like each one should be longer than just four issues. However, the story arcs seem to fit this format thus far, as each of these truly feels like their own chapter in a larger novel.

In this one, we see Splinter and Shredder finally meet face-to-face. They also come to the realization that each is their ancient mortal enemy, meeting again in the modern world because destiny is a real bitch.

This also sees the Turtles get into their first official fight with Shredder while also meeting a new ally in Angel, along with her gang The Purple Dragons. We also see April come to discover just who the Turtles and Splinter are. Frankly, a lot happens in little time and even if there is a lot of story, there is also a lot of action.

This is a well-balanced series between its narrative, character building, relationship development and the action itself.

I love how this rebooted reimagining by original creator Kevin Eastman has set the foundation for what’s to come. This truly is a solid and satisfying series up to this point and I hope that this greatness maintains throughout.

Rating: 8.75/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 2: Enemies Old, Enemies New

Published: August 31st, 2012
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Dan Duncan, Mat Santolouco
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 104 Pages

Review:

Since I was impressed by the first volume in the rebooted Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series by IDW and original creator, Kevin Eastman, I had to quickly jump into the second chapter of this long-running series to see if the momentum would maintain.

Short answer: it did!

In fact, this is even better than the first installment, as it builds off of the origin of the characters and then goes further back into who Splinter was, as well as Shredder, who hadn’t yet appeared.

This also introduces Krang and helps to setup his story and what appears to be conflict with Shredder and his Foot Clan. So unlike the cartoon and the stories most fans are familiar with, Shredder and Krang aren’t on the same page here. And frankly, that makes this really interesting.

Like the previous volume, I enjoyed the art style and it just looks and feels right, aesthetically. Especially, for those of us who enjoyed the original Turtles comic stories.

This series has been really good, thus far, and I can’t wait to jump into the third volume, which I’d imagine I’ll do in the next week or so.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Vids I Dig 315: Comic Tropes: ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ Co-Creator Kevin Eastman: How to Lose $14 Million In Indie Comics

From Comic Tropes’ YouTube description: Kevin Eastman co-created the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles with Peter Laird in 1984. They self-published the comic book and retained all the rights. This video shows how the business needs pulled Eastman away from being creative as well as how he got seriously involved with creator’s rights. Eastman has run Mirage Studios, Tundra Publishing and Heavy Metal Magazine. This has given him both massive success and allowed him to blow a fortune of around $14 million on independent comics. The video also takes a close look at his artistic techniques and his inspirations from Jack Kirby to Frank Miller.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 1: Change Is Constant

Published: February 8th, 2012
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Dan Duncan, Ronda Pattison
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 102 Pages

Review:

I have heard really good things about IDW’s regular Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles reboot series. I’ve only read bits and pieces over the last decade but I thought that I’d start way back at the beginning, in an effort to catch up with the 100-plus issues the series has now released.

The main selling point for me was that Kevin Eastman, the original TMNT creator, was one of the writers on this rebooted continuity. It’s sad that Peter Laird isn’t doing this along with him but Eastman’s involvement gives this take on the Turtles some real legitimacy.

I’m happy to say that this was a really good introduction to the characters and even if it tweaks their origin, somewhat, it felt true to the classic comic book series while also tapping into the spirit and energy of the cartoon, which was how most kids discovered the franchise.

I thought that the art was perfect, as it hearkened back to that primitive Turtles art style while also being a real improvement over it without trying to diminish the original series’ aesthetic.

It’s hard to say how much I’ll enjoy the whole series, just off of this first volume, but it left me gleefully optimistic. Time will tell but I think I’ll probably be pleased with what comes next.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder In Hell

Published: April 24th, 2019 – December 4th, 2019
Written by: Mateus Santolouco
Art by: Mateus Santolouco
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 146 Pages

Review:

While I haven’t read any of IDW’s regular Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles continuity, I’ve heard really good things about it from friends who love everything Turtles. Granted, they could have some bias but I figured that this miniseries had an interesting enough premise for me to check out.

I’m not sure about what led to this but Shredder is in Hell, as the title implies. I wouldn’t say that this is too dissimilar from other comics where characters go to Hell and have to face their own demons but it was still a cool read with pretty good art.

My only real complaint about it was that I felt like I needed more context and enough backstory wasn’t revealed within this five issue arc.

Additionally, there were big delays between the issues getting released and waiting three months for issue five really hurt the momentum of the series, as it’s hard to retain most of the details from the first four issues, when you are getting old and read dozens of comics per month.

In a nutshell, this isn’t a bad effort but it’s not a very good effort. I felt lost through parts of it but the art salvaged some of it and at least it was visually neat.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: other recent Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics from IDW, especially since this ties to the main story in that continuity.