Comic Review: Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man, Vol. 1: Revival

Published: November 5th, 2014
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Dave Marquez, Mark Bagley, Mark Brooks, Stuart Immonen, David Laufente

Marvel Comics, 130 Pages

Review:

Since I really dug Brian Michael Bendis’ first run on the Miles Morales version of Spider-Man, I really wanted to jump into this. Also, there was some open ended stuff after the first Spider-Men event that I was curious at seeing play out. Although, that stuff isn’t quite addressed yet.

This starts off with Miles and all of Peter’s loved ones having a wake for him. It’s a really good single issue that sets the tone, especially since we discover that there is a version of Peter Parker alive in this universe now.

Miles comes into conflict with Peter Parker once again but this version of Parker isn’t the same one he met in Spider-Men and his appearance is a mystery weaved through the story, which definitely motivated me to read through this pretty quickly.

We don’t get a lot of answers here, as I’m assuming that those will come in volume two, the second half of this run for Miles.

But this also leads to the first confrontation between Miles and a mysteriously resurrected Norman Osborn. Also, this universe’s version of the Green Goblin is very different.

I don’t want to spoil too much of the plot, as the Miles stories are typically a fun read with this one being no different. I have been critical about Bendis’ work as of late but his creation of the Miles Morales character and his work on these short runs show that he still had something worthwhile to offer just a few years ago.

I can’t say the same for his work at DC, which started this past summer.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: The other early Mile Morales Spider-Man stories. Also, Spider-Men I and II and Spider-Verse.

Comic Review: The Death of Daredevil

Published: October 17th, 2018 – November 28th, 2018
Written by: Charles Soule
Art by: Phil Noto

Marvel Comics, 112 Pages

Review:

This story takes place over Daredevil issues 609 through 612 and marks the end of Charles Soule’s run. And while I’m anticipating new blood taking over the writing duties for this series, I have mostly enjoyed Soule’s work.

So it’s hard to talk about this story without spoiling it. So if you want to go into it blind, why are you reading a review for it anyway? Just scroll down now and see the rating.

The title of this alludes to Daredevil meeting his demise. However, there is a twist to that, which I have to admit, I didn’t see coming even though their were some obvious pieces laid out in this arc and the one before it.

Wilson Fisk a.k.a. the Kingpin is still mayor of New York, Daredevil, as a hero and a lawyer, has tried to push back and expose Fisk for the criminal that everyone, even those who voted for him, already know he is.

That being said, this story is the end of an era for both Daredevil and Kingpin. I won’t say what happened but the seeds have been planted for great change going forward on all fronts.

This also had brief cameos from some of the key Avengers in a court room scene, as well as a run in with Bullseye and some other well-known villains along the way. We also get the debut of a new villain named Vigil, who looks cool as hell but as this story unfolds, leaves me wondering if he’d even show up again.

The story was pretty good but I’m just not a fan of the art style. I know it’s appealing to some but it just lacks energy. I hope Daredevil gets back to a grittier and almost pulpy neo-noir feel once the new team takes over.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Charles Soule story arcs on Daredevil that lead up to this finale.

Comic Review: Typhoid Fever

Published: October 3rd, 2018 – December 12th, 2018
Written by: Clay McLeod Chapman
Art by: Stefano Landini, Will Robson, Paolo Villanelli, R.B. Silva (covers)

Marvel Comics, 94 Pages

Review:

Typhoid Fever was a series of three one-shots but they were all part of a single story. The series focused on Typhoid Mary, who is traditionally a Daredevil villain. However, Daredevil wasn’t involved with this story and instead, the focus as far as the hero side of the story was on Spider-Man, Iron Fist and the X-Men.

With these being one-shots strung together as a sort of mini event, I felt that the time between the release of each issue was too long. Reason being, I read a ton of comics and by the time I got to each new issue, I barely remembered what happened in the one preceding it. Which also reflects on the writing, as nothing seemed memorable or all that noteworthy.

I just read this and I really only recall the details of the final issue, which featured Iron Fist. I did enjoy it better than the other two issues though with the Spider-Man one being okay and the X-Men one making me want to quit this miniseries before the final chapter.

The issues were just inconsistent and even though the last issue was the strongest, it didn’t really improve the other ones by tying things together in a nice, fluid way.

The art was also just okay. It didn’t blow my socks off but it wasn’t terrible. It was pretty standard and didn’t have any sort of stylistic flourish to it, which is an issue I have had with a lot of modern Marvel books. Everything just seems to be passable and lacking personality and flair.

I’m not even sure why this series was made. It didn’t do much to make Typhoid Mary a more interesting character. Maybe they did this because she debuted in live action form, earlier this year in the Iron Fist TV show. But if that’s the case, they should have released this six months earlier.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: Charles Soule’s recent run on Daredevil. Also, any Typhoid Mary story arc from Daredevil since her debut in the late ’80s.

Comic Review: Spider-Men

Published: May 8th, 2013
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Sara Pichelli, Jim Cheung (covers)

Marvel Comics, 112 Pages

Review:

Say what you will about Brian Michael Bendis’ horrible run on Superman titles. I stopped picking them up a few months ago. He is a guy that comic fans like to trash and if I’m being honest, it’s justified in 2018. However, Bendis can write and Spider-Men is proof of that.

The reason I say that, even though I don’t like a lot of the man’s work, is because this story had a few moments that really hit me in the feels hard. More so than just about any comic I’ve read in recent memory.

This story sees Peter Parker get whisked away to a new dimension. There, he meets Miles Morales, the young Spider-Man that has replaced Parker after he died there. While the story is action packed and it’s friggin’ awesome seeing Miles and Peter finally meet, the story is it’s strongest when it explores the emotions of Peter and what’s happened to him and his love ones in this alternate reality.

There are sweet subtle moments between Parker and Aunt May, as well as Gwen Stacy. There is also that moment when he sees Mary Jane, who runs away and breaks down because her Peter is dead.

This also had great exchanges between Peter and just about everyone in the Ultimates universe. He’s baffled by Nick Fury’s blackness and coolness and botherd by Tony Stark’s drinking.

I also liked what Bendis did here with Mysterio, who is the reason why this event happened. Mysterio is explored and presented in a new way than just simply being a professional illusionist turned mad.

My only complaint is the motivation and actions of Peter when he first meets Miles. He was initially way too aggressive, especially when suspecting that Miles was just a kid. His actions were a bit extreme and careless and he acted a lot more rash than Peter Parker would.

But again, that’s the only real complaint.

This was solid, it was fun, it touched me on an emotional level and as much as I have always loved Peter and Miles on their own, this made me yearn for more team ups. I know that they’ve had a lot now and that I’m playing catch up and I’m sure it’ll run its course quickly but I’m still enthused about what comes after this.

Rating: 9.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Miles Morales stories by Bendis.

TV Review: The Comic Book Greats: Episode 1 – Spotlight on Todd McFarlane (1991)

Released: 1991
Created by: Stan Lee
Directed by: Rick Stawinski
Music by: Rick Stawinski, Rob Stawinski
Cast: Stan Lee (host), Todd McFarlane

Excelsior Productions, Stabur Home Video, 50 Minutes

Review:

I didn’t have all of these VHS tapes when I was a kid but I did have a lot of them. Luckily for me, and all of you, these are on YouTube. I’ve wanted to revisit these for ages but I haven’t had a working VCR since the Bush II administration.

I was going to review the series as a whole. However, after watching the first episode, which featured Stan Lee interviewing Todd McFarlane, I felt that each episode probably deserves its own review.

This was great to see, twenty-seven years later, as I’m no longer twelve and I had a much greater appreciation of this now than I did back then.

First of all, it was fantastic seeing Stan Lee, still with some youthful vigor, interviewing Todd McFarlane and discussing art techniques and the history of the business, as well as Todd’s career.

It’s pretty clear that Todd would have been a great teacher, as he shows the how and why he employs the techniques he does. For those wanting to get into drawing comics, this is a pretty valuable tool and I’m assuming the other episodes in this series are too. That’s actually why I bought a half dozen of these back in the early ’90s.

All in all, I liked hearing Todd and Stan share stories of the comic industry. Watching them shoot the shit for an hour was a lot of fun.

McFarlane is one of the all-time greats and what makes this even more interesting, is that it came out when he was transitioning away from Marvel and Spider-Man and just gearing up to establish Image Comics and his greatest creation, Spawn.

I really enjoyed this episode and I hope the others live up to the precedent set with this first one.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: other episodes in The Comic Book Greats video series.

Comic Review: Marvel’s What If? (2018 Minieries)

Published: October 3rd, 2018 – October 31st, 2018
Written by: various
Art by: various

Marvel Comics, 136 Pages

Review:

Marvel has had several different runs with their What If? title. I have always been a fan of it, as it gives us new and different takes on Marvel characters. Usually, they show what happens if characters made different choices or if a major event had a different outcome. I couldn’t read enough of these when I was a kid and in a lot of ways, when I first came into comics, it was What If? that pinpointed the moments throughout Marvel history that were the most pivotal.

This 2018 miniseries was only six issues and all of them were unfortunately released over just five weeks. I wish they would make this an ongoing series again or at least spread them out more.

Like the X-Men: Black miniseries, which also came out weekly over October, this had different creative teams with each issue and it showed.

The six stories in this series were What If Flash Thompson Became Spider-Man?What If X-Men? (not a clearly defined title), What If Peter Parker Became the Punisher?What If Marvel Comics Went Metal with Ghost Rider?, What if Thor Was Raised by Frost Giants? and What If Magik Became Sorcerer Supreme?

Out of the six titles, the only ones I really enjoyed were the Magik and Punisher ones. Thor and Flash Thompson were okay but the X-Men one was a mess and the Ghost Rider one was one of the worst comics I’ve read in several years. I mean, it was beyond atrocious and getting through it was a hell of a chore.

Marvel could rectify their problems with this series, if they don’t rush them next time. If this was a regular monthly series like it was at its peak, the stories would probably have more time devoted to them.

Some of the art even felt rushed and half assed.

Ultimately, I liked a few issues but I can’t really recommend the series over all.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: old school What If? comics, many of which have been re-released for $1 under the True Believers imprint.

Comic Review: Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 5

Published: May 1st, 2014
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: David Marquez, Sara Pichelli

Marvel Comics, 125 Pages

Review:

This is the final volume in the first Miles Morales Spider-Man comic book series. It picks up one year after the previous volume, which saw Miles quit being Spidey after the death of his mother. Ultimately, this was a good finale to the first Miles run.

The story arc here mostly deals with Miles’ grief but even if it takes a few issues to get him back in the saddle, I didn’t mind seeing him work through his problems and trying to figure out who he is supposed to be.

Plus, this is still action packed once it gets going and we also get to see a team form between Miles, Spider-Woman, Bombshell and Cloak & Dagger, who make their Ultimate continuity debut. In fact, this also serves as the Ultimate Cloak & Dagger origin story.

In addition to that, we get to see Roxxon become exposed, come to understand more about the events that led to Miles getting Spidey powers and just how shady S.H.I.E.L.D. is in this universe.

Last but certainly not least, we get to see the Ultimate universe version of the Taskmaster, who is one of my favorite villains of all-time. I don’t like this version of the character as much as the original but it was still cool to see Miles take on one of the most dangerous villains in Marvel history.

This was well paced, even with the slower start, it had great character development and frankly, this is really Brian Michael Bendis at his best. I know that Bendis gets a lot of slack for a lot of things but this showcases the man’s talent and should be held up pretty high on his long list of stories that he’s wrote over the last few decades.

Solid, through and through, I truly loved this series and the Miles Morales character.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: The other early Mile Morales Spider-Man stories. Also, Spider-Men I and II and Spider-Verse.