Film Review: The Accountant (2001)

Also known as: O Contador
Release Date: January, 2001 (Sundance)
Directed by: Ray McKinnon
Written by: Ray McKinnon
Music by: Rusty Andrews
Cast: Ray McKinnon, Walton Goggins, Eddie King

Ginny Mule Pictures, 40 Minutes

Review:

“If a man builds a machine and that machine conspires with another machine built by another man, are those men conspiring?” – The Accountant

I didn’t know much about Ray McKinnon other than his role as the preacher on the first season on Deadwood and seeing him pop up a few times in Sons of Anarchy. But he was a powerful performer and really lured me in when he was on screen.

I’ve been a fan of Walton Goggins for a really long time. I remember seeing him for the first time in that terrible fourth Karate Kid film and that also terrible third Major League movie. However, he stuck with me. I then remember seeing him get an Academy Award way back in 2002 for a short film that he had produced. I figured I’d check it out, as I wanted to go back and see a lot more of his earlier indie stuff. To my surprise, that short film was written, directed and starred Ray McKinnon. Well, it stars Goggins too, as well as another actor, Eddie King.

Man, I don’t really know how to describe this but it takes you to a lot of places emotionally in forty minutes. It is the perfect length, however. Had this been stretched out to feature length it probably would’ve dragged on too much and lost it’s impact.

In a lot of ways, this is like a punch to the gut but not in a bad way. There is some serious stuff to deal with here but it leaves you with some hope and also taps into the nostalgia of those who love simpler times and classic Americana.

This really has a strong Southern spirit to it in the best way possible.

McKinnon is utterly f’n superb in this and Goggins was the perfect actor to play off of him. These guys have real chemistry, which is probably why they’ve been good friends for years and have done multiple projects together.

I also thought that the music made for the film by Rusty Andrews was damn good and really added to the emotions and feelings that this film successfully conveyed.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: Ray McKinnon’s Randy and the Mob and Chrystal.

Film Review: Bluebeard (1936)

Also known as: Barbe-Bleue (original French title)
Release Date: December 31st, 1936 (France)
Directed by: René Bertrand, Jean Painlevé
Written by: Charles Perrault
Music by: Jean Vincent-Bréchignac

13 Minutes

Review:

Barbe-Bleue or Bluebeard is an animated short film from France that uses claymation to tell its story.

It’s not an exciting story and it is told more like a musical than a regular dramatic film but it is at least pleasant to look at. The art is beautiful, the colors are very vibrant and vivid. I’m assuming though that the original version of the film was done in black and white and the colorized versions was made later.

The stop motion is well executed and everything looks as smooth as it can for being made in the 1930s.

This is subtitled, as it is French, but with just about all of the dialogue coming through in song form, it almost even isn’t necessary to need the translation. Plus, the emotions and actions that are referenced in the music are pretty apparent on screen.

This isn’t an easy to track down short. I luckily found it on FIlmStruck and gave it a watch there, as I was looking for something short to kill 15 minutes or so. This did the trick.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: Other shorts by Jean Painlevé: Le VampireSea UrchinsLiquid Crystals and The Fourth Dimension.

*Sadly, no trailer or other videos I can post for this.

Film Review: Teeth (2015)

Release Date: January 25th, 2015 (Sundance)
Directed by: Tom Brown, Daniel Gray
Written by: Tom Brown, Daniel Gray
Cast: Richard E. Grant (narrator)

Holbrooks, Blacklist, 7 Minutes

Review:

“That which is neglected, is lost.” – tagline

This is a short animated film about a guy and his relationship with his teeth over the course of his life.

What made this work for me was two key things.

The first was the narration by Richard E. Grant. His voice was perfectly paced and pleasant to listen to even if the visuals weren’t welcoming in certain parts. Just thinking of the knife and teeth scene gives me a bit of a chill but Grant’s voice was very soothing and drew you in.

The other thing that worked for me was the animation style. I just loved the look of this, the toned down colors, the flow of the movement and most importantly, how the shaky animation lines added a certain level of tension to the proceedings.

This is definitely an art piece more than anything but this is a good example of short film as art. It is both beautiful and disturbing, soothing and stressful. How those things mixed so well together is due to the meticulous craftsmanship of the writing and direction by both Tom Brown and Daniel Gray.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: Probably any of the other modern short films you can find on FilmStruck’s streaming service, where I watch most of the stuff I find like this.

Film Review: Lemon (1969)

Release Date: 1969
Directed by: Hollis Frampton

Janus Films, 7 Minutes

Review:

Let’s do a little quiz, shall we?

Do you hate yourself?

Do you hate yourself to the point of torturing yourself for seven long minutes of excrutiating boredom?

Do you like pretentious bullshit art?

Do you like pretentious bullshit artists that think they’re changing the world by giving it absolute dreck of the lowest and most dumbed down caliber possible?

Do you like 1950s beatnik poetry?

Do you like eating dried up pieces of cat poop?

If you answered yes to any or all of these questions, then you’ll probably connect with Hollis Frampton’s Lemon.

This “short film”, as some academic weirdos have called this, is very much like his other film Carrots & Peas, which I also reviewed some time ago (see here) and concluded that I would never watch anything with this guy’s name on it again. But alas, I lost a bet. So I was subjected to this seven minute train wreck that felt like seven days.

All this is, is staring at a fucking lemon for seven minutes as a light slowly moves around it. This is like some test footage an amateur trying to get into cinematography would do as a learning exercise but would never show the world because it’s just some bullshit test footage. But this motherfucker made it into fucking art and some USDA prime queef patties running museums and art exhibits let this guy play this thing on a loop.

Full disclosure, I am an artist by trade. This is the kind of art I fucking hate because it isn’t art. This is pretentious, no talent bullshit that a grade schooler would try to pass off to their teacher in art class and then get a “D” because you can’t give mentally handicapped people an “F”.

There really isn’t much else to talk about because this is just seven minutes of staring at a lemon. I can do that on my own with the right kind of drugs. You know, the kind of drugs that’ll just put me into some sort of stupor, as a I stare off into space… or at a lemon I strategically placed in front of myself before before popping the magic pill.

Below I added the entire movie sped up to seven seconds instead of seven minutes so that you don’t have to waste your time like I fucking did.

Rating: 0.25/10
Pairs well with: Carrots & Peas, which is basically just staring at produce again. Also, chewing on earthworm jerky.

Film Review: Logorama (2009)

Also known as: Logorama©
Release Date: May 20th, 2009 (Cannes)
Directed by: François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy, Ludovic Houplain
Written by: François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy, Ludovic Houplain, Gregory J. Pruss
Music by: Bryan Ray Turcotte, Dayna Turcotte
Cast: Bob Stephenson, Sherman Augustus, Aja Evans

H5, Autour de Minuit Productions, Little Minx Films, Cinéma Public Films, 16 Minutes

Review:

“[after getting berated by his boss] Captain Douchebag.” – Michelinman Mike

This was brilliant. And I don’t mean that the concept was brilliant but the execution of the concept was. Granted, the concept was cool but seeing it come together and how it came together far exceeded what I anticipated.

I thought, “Oh, this is a short film about logos coming to life. They’ll probably sing and dance and do some boring shit I won’t much care for.” But this was more like Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas coming to life with Ronald McDonald as a madman and a police force full of gung ho Michelinmen. Then there was Mr. Clean, the Green Giant, Big Boy, the Haribo kid and a bunch of other famous branding icons interacting in a world completely constructed in logos.

This was a quick watch but it was fun, thoroughly entertaining and I instantly became a fan of it and had to send it out to several friends that were unaware of its existence.

I don’t want to ruin the plot for anyone, even though it’s just a couple simple stories that overlap.

But this is pretty hilarious and it will be hard to not get mesmerized by it on a first viewing.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: Other animated short films: The Lost ThingHarvie KrumpetRyan and The Lady and the Reaper.

Film Review: The Idle Class (1921)

Also known as: Vanity Fair (alternate title)
Release Date: September 25th, 1921
Directed by: Charles Chaplin
Written by: Charles Chaplin
Music by: Johnnie von Haines (1969), Charles Chaplin (original)
Cast: Charles Chaplin, Edna Purviance, Henry Bergman, Mack Swain

Charles Chaplin Productions, First National, 32 Minutes

Review:

“I will occupy other rooms until you stop drinking.” – Edna, Neglected Wife

I had never seen this short by Charlie Chaplin until now. He has so many films and seeing them all is a big feat. Well, seeing the ones that have survived and not been lost to time.

I had no idea that this had a bunch of golf gags in it, which was really amusing and cool to see done in the Chaplin style.

There are a lot of gags and stunts that are incredible to watch, especially today when most of these stunts would be achieved by using CGI or green screens. This almost plays like a 1920s Caddyshack. Granted, there isn’t a gopher. But come to think of it, Chaplin versus the famous gopher would have been comedy gold.

Anyway, the biggest narrative focus in this film isn’t golf itself but about Chaplin’s Tramp character crossing paths with the richer class. This isn’t a new shtick for him, as the Tramp often times finds himself in these situations but with Chaplin, it’s the gags that make the movie and this one doesn’t disappoint.

The Idle Class isn’t a classic like City Lights but it is a strong and effective outing for Chaplin that only served to keep propelling his career forward.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: Other Chaplin pictures during his run with First National: A Dog’s LifeShoulder ArmsSunnysideThe KidPay DayThe Pilgrim, etc.

Film Review: Tord and Tord (2010)

Also known as: Tord och Tord (original Swedish title)
Release Date: January 29th, 2010 (Göteborg Film Festival)
Directed by: Niki Lindroth von Bahr
Written by: Niki Lindroth von Bahr
Cast: Thomas Tidholm

11 Minutes

Review:

After watching Niki Lindroth von Bahr’s The Burden, I wanted to go back in time a bit and check out her short film from 2010, which is done in a similar style.

This follows a character named Tord who mistakenly walks into the apartment next door to discover someone moving in. This character is also named Tord.

Tord and Tord develop a friendship and as it evolves, they develop their own code and unique way of conversing. As time goes on and the new Tord makes the codes more complex, the original Tord feels more distant, as things have become far less personal and intimate in their conversations. He just wants to talk to the new Tord like a real person but old Tord just sends more complex coded messages. Maybe, in some ways, this reflects the dynamic of many social media friendships.

This film, like The Burden, is short and sweet and has a quality that is very genuine and endearing in a lot of ways.

I absolutely adore Niki Lindroth von Bahr’s style. Her films are both cute and dark… or they at least have some dark undertones that rise to the top.

Unlike The Burden, though, this one doesn’t leave you with much hope in the end. It’s pretty sad, actually.

I think this is an easy film to relate to, as the old Tord is a bit heartbroken by his friendship withering away and becoming awkward. I think most people, if not all, have experienced this at some point in their life.

Rating: 9.5/10
Pairs well with: Niki Lindroth von Bahr The Burden.