Film Review: Young Sherlock Holmes (1985)

Also known as: Young Sherlock Holmes and the Pyramid of Fear (original script title)
Release Date: December 4th, 1985
Directed by: Barry Levinson
Written by: Chris Columbus
Based on: characters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Music by: Bruce Broughton
Cast: Nicholas Rowe, Alan Cox, Anthony Higgins, Sophie Ward, Roger Ashton-Griffiths, Freddie Jones, Nigel Stock, Brian Oulton, Susan Fleetwood

Industrial Light & Magic, Amblin Entertainment, Paramount Pictures, 109 Minutes

Review:

“A great detective relies on perception, intelligence, and imagination.” – Sherlock Holmes

It may sound strange since I’m a kid of the ’80s and a massive Spielberg fan from that era but I’ve never seen Young Sherlock Holmes.

Now I have seen clips of it over the years, due to its very early use of emerging CGI technology, which made this a very groundbreaking film in digital effects, even if it wasn’t a massive hit like Steven Spielberg, Chris Columbus and Berry Levinson had hoped.

Honestly, it’s those effects that have cemented this motion picture as a relevant one for its time. Nothing else within it is all that memorable or significant. But that’s not to say it’s not good. It’s just be pretty forgettable without its great effects for the time in which it was produced.

I mostly liked this and I liked the kids in it and how they helped generate a sense of wonder, which is something Hollywood is completely unable to do in modern times. Still, this movie does drag in several spots and while I can buy the kids in these specific roles, they’re not that memorable except for Sophie Ward, who would go on to have an interesting career.

I liked the whole Egyptian cult that Sherlock and company were trying to expose and take down but if I’m being honest, a lot of that stuff felt like it was recycled from the Thugee cult stuff in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and that film came out only a year earlier and also involved Spielberg, as he directed it.

This also has a magical element to it and because it stars some proper British kids, there’s a particular vibe that I can best describe as proto-Harry Potter.

Young Sherlock Holmes isn’t a movie that I felt like I missed out on. As a kid, I would’ve certainly liked the effects heavy scenes like the stain glass knight but I probably would’ve been bored for 75 percent of the movie.

Rating: 6.25/10

Vids I Dig 434: Filmento: ‘Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows’: How to Film Intelligence

From Filmento’s YouTube description: It’s been almost a decade since Robert Downey Jr and Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and we still haven’t gotten any closer to that Sherlock Holmes 3 movie. And that’s a bummer because both the movies have been really great, and Downey Jr as Sherlock is up there with his role as Tony Stark Iron Man. Benedict Cumberbatch does a great role too, but there’s something Jack Sparrow-y about this version. But if there is something A Game of Shadows really shines at, it’s intelligent writing. It always helps to have Guy Ritchie direct and feature super smart characters like Holmes and Moriarty, but there’s more to it as well. And so in today’s family friendly episode of Film Perfection, let’s see what narrative techniques do the writers use in this movie to pull off a script that comes off as one of the smartest ever written.

Comic Review: Joker: The Clown Prince of Crime

Published: December 3rd, 2013
Written by: Dennis O’Neil
Art by: Dick Giordano

DC Comics, 176 Pages

Review:

This book collects the mid-’70s Joker series, which ran for nine issues. The only story from this series that I had ever read was the one featuring the Creeper, which was also reprinted for the collection The Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told. It was cool finding this and being able to check out this classic series.

I think the thing that I enjoyed most about this is that it allowed the Joker to shine on his own without any involvement from Batman whatsoever. The Caped Crusader never appears and just when you think he does, it is a ruse by the Joker. Although, I’m not sure why he is on the cover, or the Riddler and Penguin for that matter, as none of these people appear in the book.

We do see the Joker interact with other famous DC Comics characters though.

There are stories that feature Two-Face, Green Arrow, Black Canary, Catwoman, Scarecrow, Lex Luthor, the Royal Flush Gang, Sherlock Holmes and a brief cameo by the Hal Jordan version of Green Lantern. Then there’s also that entertaining story with the Creeper.

Being that this is a Joker comic, it really plays up the comedy and is actually funny, even if it is chock-full of ’70s hokey cheese.

This is a nice time capsule back to the Bronze Age of comics before things started to evolve with the style by the mid-’80s.

This is also a must own if you are a big fan of the Joker and want to have a nice laugh at the expense of the other villains and heroes he toys with here.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: The Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told

Film Review: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959)

Release Date: May 4th, 1959 (UK)
Directed by: Terence Fisher
Written by: Peter Bryan
Based on: The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Music by: James Bernard
Cast: Peter Cushing, André Morell, Christopher Lee

Hammer Film Productions, United Artists, 87 Minutes

Review:

“I warned him! What could have possessed him to come out here alone?” – Sherlock Holmes

The Sherlock Holmes franchise is possibly the biggest of all-time, as the character has had more literary stories than I care to count and an endless stream of movies and television shows going back to the invention of celluloid. Maybe there are more live action Dracula adaptations but one can’t deny that Holmes has owned pop culture before the term “pop culture” entered the mainstream lexicon.

It’s only natural that Hammer would take a crack at a Holmes story after their success at adapting Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, along with their versions of The Mummy and their other horror successes. Plus, they had the uber talented Peter Cushing at their disposal, who was definitely Hammer’s perfect man to play the world’s most famous detective. Add in Cushing’s best friend and the man he worked with the most, Christopher Lee, and you’ve got a solid cast. However, this also teamed the great duo up with Hammer’s third best male lead, André Morell. And then on top of that, this was directed by Hammer’s premier director, Terence Fisher. To put it simply, Hammer assembled their dream team to give life to the literary work of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

What I most enjoyed about this film, is that even if it takes some liberties, it doesn’t do what you would expect Hammer to do. What I mean is that it doesn’t give the story a supernatural twist. It could have been easily turned into a werewolf movie or had a bunch of black magic stuff but it kept things grounded in reality and honestly, that made for a better picture than conjuring up some sort of unnatural threat.

While I always loved seeing Cushing and Lee together, Cushing spends more time with Morell, which is fun stuff to watch, as I love both men and wish that they got to play off of each other more often. Morell should have been in more films with Cushing and Lee, as the three men are sort of Hammer’s Holy Trinity.

This is a very straightforward Holmes picture that does the material some justice and is a nice experience, overall. It has that standard late ’50s/early ’60s Hammer visual aesthetic, which just makes this cooler and helps to make it fit within their catalog of horror titles from that time.

I love Holmes pictures and I love Hammer, so this is certainly a film I really enjoy and appreciate for a myriad of reasons.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: Other early Hammer films starring Cushing and Lee. Also, the Hammer film with André Morell that deals with the undead: The Plague of the Zombies. I also like pairing this with another Hammer classic that stars the super cool Oliver Reed: The Curse of the Werewolf.