Comic Review: Conan: Serpent War

Published: April 22nd, 2020
Written by: Jim Zub
Art by: Vanesa R. Del Rey, Scot Eaton, Ig Guara, Luca Pizzari, Stephen Segovia, Carlos Pacheco (cover)
Based on: characters by Robert E. Howard

Marvel Comics, 115 Pages

Review:

Conan: Serpent War is kind of a neat idea.

It probably shouldn’t give top billing to Conan though, as it is a miniseries that features four heroes: the others being Dark Agnes, Solomon Kane and the one non-Robert E. Howard creation, Marvel’s Moon Knight.

The story is about this guy who has a psychic link to all four characters, regardless of their place in time and space. He brings them all together to help stop the two serpent-like gods who are going to war with one another.

My biggest complaint is that the story is pretty thin and wonky. And also, you never really get to see them all come together in any meaningful way.

Still, it’s a mostly entertaining story, that’s a pretty quick read.

I can’t say that it failed to meet expectations, because I didn’t have any. But it certainly doesn’t exceed them either. It mostly felt like a wasted opportunity to make an actual team that’s pretty interesting and could’ve made for some compelling developments.

However, with Conan’s involvement in the Savage Avengers title, this feels pretty weak by comparison.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: other Conan comics Marvel has done since getting the license back.

Comic Review: Queen Sonja, Vol. 4: Son of Set

Published: October 3rd, 2012
Written by: Arvid Nelson
Art by: Edgar Salazar
Based on: Red Sonya by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonja by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith

Dynamite Entertainment, 140 Pages

Review:

Where the previous installment of the Queen Sonja series felt kind of light and was more of a prequel/Year One type of tale, this moves the story forward in a great way and also serves as a sequel to Red Sonja Vs. Thulsa Doom, as Doom is resurrected by an ancient force claiming to be the god Set.

All the Thulsa stuff here is pretty great for fans of the character. Also, everything with Set has very strong Lovecraftian vibes and it draws comparisons to the old Robert E. Howard stories that kind of tied to Lovecraft’s mythos, as the two writers were very close friends and it’s been said that it’s possible that the original Conan, Kull and Red Sonya stories happen in the same universe as Lovecraft’s.

The story was the second strongest of the Queen Sonja series thus far, following the second volume. I liked the action, the stakes and how Sonja overcame adversity and was able to further develop into a real leader, able to rally her kingdom behind her, even when it’s all in complete disarray.

My only complaint about the story is that the faux Set and Thulsa Doom sort of have their own battle and we didn’t get the satisfaction of seeing Sonja really fight either of them. But the ending, regardless of that payoff, was still good and it makes sense for the story. I just wanted to see Sonja and Doom get into a physical confrontation once again.

Overall, this was some good shit, especially for fans of Howard lore, Lovecraftian lore and simple yet badass sword and sorcery tales.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other older Red Sonja comics from Dynamite.

Vids I Dig 236: Midnight’s Edge: ‘Conan The Barbarian’: One Year at Marvel Comics – In Review

From the Midnight’s Edge YouTube description: One year ago, on January 1st of 2019, Conan the Barbarian returned to Marvel comics. While the original run of Conan comics from Marvel directly lead to the movies starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Dark Horse comics have had the Conan license the past two decades. So how has Conan fared with Marvel now that they got the license back, in this day and age?

We are about to find out, for in this video, @AndreEinherjar will give his honest review on each Conan title Marvel has released over their first year with the license in our current era, as well as his assessment on what the future might hold for Marvel at Conan, and how that in turn in may influence the future of Conan in all other media, including film, so be sure to stay for that.

Comic Review: Queen Sonja, Vol. 3: Coming of Age

Published: May 30th, 2012
Written by: Luke Lieberman
Art by: Mel Rubi
Based on: Red Sonya by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonja by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith

Dynamite Entertainment, 117 Pages

Review:

I really dug the hell out of the previous volume in the Queen Sonja saga, so naturally, I wanted to keep moving forward in the series.

This chapter didn’t quite hit the mark for me but it was still enjoyable.

The main reason, is that this was more of an origin story told in flashback and I didn’t feel like it progressed the larger Queen Sonja arc forward.

Also, being that it is kind of like a Year One type of tale, it could’ve existed as its own miniseries, as opposed to being wedged into a regular, ongoing series.

Looking at it on its own, it is a good, energetic tale with lots of action and insight into how Sonja developed into the women she would become, a future warrior queen.

Luke Lieberman knows the character well but he should, as his family owns the Red Sonja brand. Regardless of nepotism or what have you, he’s one of the best Red Sonja writers since the classic Roy Thomas era. As he continues on in this series beyond this story, it motivates me to read the other volumes.

I don’t mean for my words to sound harsh, I liked this, it just felt like a roadblock. Or more like a side quest in an RPG game that takes you away from the main story.

That’s fine but this may have been better off being a companion miniseries, published alongside the Queen Sonja title.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other older Red Sonja comics from Dynamite.

Comic Review: Queen Sonja, Vol. 2

Published: July 6th, 2011
Written by: Arvid Nelson
Art by: Jackson Herbert
Based on: Red Sonya by Robert E. Howard, Red Sonja by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith

Dynamite Entertainment, 140 Pages

Review:

This volume in the Queen Sonja saga was a huge step up from the first one.

By the start of this, she is already queen and she’s been ruling for a bit.

The bulk of the story revolves around a young man, very similar looking to Conan or Kalidor from the Red Sonja movie, but if he were younger and not as buff as Schwarzenegger. This character also has a little sister and a demon possessed sword that bites off the fingers of others who try to use it.

Sonja and the young man are at odds with each other, due to a history between their peoples. However, she soon takes the man and his sister in and shortly after, starts to fall for the guy romantically.

There is more to the man than what is apparent at first and everything is tied to his demon sword and to his backstory, which saw his mother sleep with a demon beast to help her family survive after the death of her husband.

The story is fast paced, well written with likable characters and a romantic angle that is believable for the Sonja character. She struggles with her emotions, a defeat and has to learn how to balance all that with being a monarch to a kingdom that has some major issues and cultural biases.

The art is pretty good and I found it to be better than the first volume as well.

In the end, I enjoyed this Red Sonja tale a lot and it makes me look forward to the third volume, which I should read and review in the near future.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: other older Red Sonja comics from Dynamite.

Vids I Dig 198: Midnight’s Edge: The Ultimate ‘Conan The Destroyer’ Retrospective

From the Midnight’s Edge YouTube description: The 1982 feature film “Conan the Barbarian” is widely considered a classic. It’s 1984 sequel however, “Conan the Destroyer”, isn’t held in anywhere near the same regard; despite the two being made within two years of each other, by the same production company – so what changed?

In this retrospective, @AndreEinherjar will uncover just that, by first exploring the changing priorities behind the scenes, and how these manifested themselves on screen as the plot evolved from its very different original conception, to what ultimately ended up in theaters, and what impact it had on the future franchise.

Comic Review: The Tomb of Dracula – The Complete Collection, Vol. 1

Published: October 4th, 2017
Written by: Gerry Conway, Archie Goodwin
Art by: Gene Colan, Alan Weiss, Gil Kane (cover)
Based on: Dracula by Bram Stoker

Marvel Comics, 518 Pages

Review:

This was an interesting collection, as it not only featured the first few story arcs of The Tomb of Dracula comic book series but it also featured issues of the black and white comics magazine Dracula Lives!

Additionally, this features the first appearance and first story of Blade, the character made most famous by Wesley Snipes in the film trilogy that kicked off in 1998. It also has a story that pits Robert E. Howard’s Solomon Kane against Dracula, capitalizing off of the popular sword and sorcery trend in comics at the time.

Overall, this is a pretty neat comic and since I love the Dracula character in many of his incarnations, it’s cool seeing Marvel’s take on him. I also like that Dracula exists within Marvel canon, as well as Robert E. Howard’s canon, because it opens up a lot of possibilities. Sadly, I don’t think we ever got a Dracula and Godzilla crossover even though both of them existed at Marvel at the same time.

I absolutely love the art in this whether its the stuff from the Tomb stories or the Lives! ones. But I do kind of wish that they would’ve made this a beefier collection of just The Tomb of Dracula while also making a collection just for Dracula Lives!

Both series are great but they’re also very different in that the Dracula Lives! comics didn’t have to adhere to the Comics Code Authority and therefore, were a lot darker, more violent and much sexier.

Anyway, I enjoyed both halves of this huge collection and I look forward to delving into the second volume in the near future.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: the later Marvel Dracula stories, as well as other ’70s Marvel horror titles.