Video Game Review: Kid Niki (NES)

Kid Niki is another one of those games that I used to love playing the shit out of. It’s just a fun, quick game that gets pretty damn challenging as you go deeper into it.

It’s a pretty basic side scroller with easy mechanics.

The characters are completely cartoony and look nothing like the absolutely badass box art. However, I don’t think that this would have been as fun if the game was made to look as serious and grim as the art.

All the boss battles are unique and some take a little trial and error to figure out but this game is definitely beatable after you’ve played it enough and gotten a feel for the mechanics and the patterns.

I don’t have as deep of a love for it now, as I did in the late ’80s and I can’t label it a classic, but revisiting it every couple of years is still a fun experience.

Plus, I really dig the music and the overall sound effects.

Kid Niki is well crafted and is still a great way to waste a half of an hour.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: other side scrolling action games for the classic Nintendo, which narrows it down to about 8 dozen games.

Vids I Dig 045: Generation Gap Gaming: ‘The Legend of Zelda’ NES Secrets and History

From Generation Gap Gaming’s YouTube description: I still get so excited talking about The Legend of Zelda on the NES because I have found so many secrets over the 30 years I’ve been playing the game and I am still finding out secrets to this day. I wanted to share my favorite secrets and historical facts with you about my favorite game of all time!

Video Game Review: Dragon Warrior II (NES)

In my review of the first Dragon Warrior a.k.a. Dragon Quest game, I’m sure I talked about how it was one of my favorite RPGs of all-time and my number one favorite for the original Nintendo.

I tried playing this one way back in the day but I couldn’t get a handle on it. I think that when I was a kid, I found it difficult because of all the bells and whistles that Enix added to this game.

You see, instead of being one badass knight, you now had a party with three characters and you also found yourself in battles with multiple enemies, sometimes as many as eight! In the original game, all the encounters were always one-on-one.

As a kid, I felt overwhelmed by this game. But as years rolled on and I played more advanced RPGs, the things that caught me offguard with this game weren’t really a problem for me anymore.

In fact, the innovations that this game made, changed the RPG landscape going forward, as everyone else started developing RPGs with parties and multiple monsters to fight all at once.

Looking at this now, and at face value, this is everything that the first game was but even better!

However, as great as this is and as much as I enjoy most of it, it’s bogged down by some problems. But the issues it has have more to do with this being the first of its kind and not having the understanding of how important gameplay balance is to an RPG.

This game is massive when compared to its predecessor. There is so much area to explore but it can be a bit much and remembering which town is which and how to get to an area is hard to remember. You definitely need to use maps with this game.

Additionally, some of the dungeons are massive and completely maddening.

But the biggest issue, is that the leveling system is unbalanced with the pacing of the game and you have to literally spend hours upon hours grinding away for experience points. The problem with that, is that it ruins the game’s momentum.

Before you can go to the final castle and run through a string of five, yes five, powerful bosses, you have to spend days, maybe weeks, building up your characters. And your second character is a total weakling that dies all the time and makes it hard for him to collect experience because of that.

Also, the game is impossible without using guides. You can talk to every person in every town but most of the time, it is never clear what you need to do to advance the plot. Playing this now, I kept a walkthrough of bullet points handy because I would have been lost without it.

A lot of people shit on this game and I understand why. I still loved playing it though. And from what I’ve heard, Dragon Warrior III corrects a lot of this game’s mistakes. I plan on playing that one in the very near future.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: The other Dragon Warrior a.k.a. Dragon Quest games for the original NES, as well as the NES Final Fantasy games.

Video Game Review: Rygar (NES)

Rygar didn’t seem to be a very popular game when it came out for the original Nintendo back in the late ’80s but I always dug the hell out of it because it was so different than everything else and it had really rad music.

It’s unique in that it provides the player with both a side scrolling mode, as well as levels that are played in a top-down bird’s-eye-view. But between both of these modes, the game’s mechanics are consistent and show how how well crafted this is, as far as the actions of the player.

There is one issue with the game that exposes a design flaw and that’s how you can make enemies disappear if they get too close to the edge of the screen. There are a lot of enemies that you can just make disappear by exposing this flaw, which makes the game easier but considering just how challenging the game is, this can become really handy in the tougher levels.

What I really find cool about this game is the weapon. It’s a disk attached to a chain but the way it moves in the game makes it feel like more of an energy weapon. You can smash the button really fast and it sort of just wiggles in place, hitting the enemies multiple times. But even with that cool caveat, the game is still a real challenge and not easy to beat.

Almost all of the levels in this are well designed and tough to navigate and this game does take a bit of a learning curve to adapt to it’s uniqueness.

In the end, this is a blast to play and it’s something I revisit every few years because I still love it.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: other side scrolling action games for the classic Nintendo, which narrows it down to about 8 dozen games.

Video Game Review: Metroid (NES)

When people talk about bonafide NES classics, Metroid is always near the top of everyone’s list and rightfully so. It’s a superb, lengthy game in an era where lengthy games didn’t really exist. In fact, this one was so lengthy that it needed a code system to allow players to pick up where they left off.

Back in 1987, this took my cousin Billy and I a few months to crack. Granted, we were also eight years-old, at the time, and had to go to elementary school full-time. We didn’t have the luxury of modern gamers, plucking away for days and days, calling off shifts at work because the obsession is more important than responsibility.

This game still plays well, especially for those of us who never quite quit playing classic Nintendo titles.

It’s fun, it’s hard and it has one of the most kick ass soundtracks of its era.

The game also spawned a franchise with many solid sequels. However, this one is still the greatest of them all, in my opinion. I never had a Super Nintendo, so I didn’t spend too much time playing Super Metroid and the Gameboy’s Metroid II was also fantastic but this one takes the cake, as far as I’m concerned.

But maybe I’ll give Super Metroid a playthrough in the near future.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: other side scrolling action games for the classic Nintendo, which narrows it down to about 8 dozen games.

Vids I Dig 035: Generation Gap Gaming: ‘Friday The 13th’ NES Secrets and History

I swear it’s just a coincidence that I’m posting this on 6/6 at 6 am. But since I noticed that when organizing the posting schedule, I thought I’d point it out.

From Generation Gap Gaming’s YouTube description: Does Friday the 13th on the NES hold a special place in your heart like me? Do you think it gets too much hate just because it’s an LJN game? Then you’re gonna love the secrets, history, and strategies I’m gonna share in today’s video.

Video Game Review: Contra (NES)

What’s cooler than a badass 8-bit shoot’em up 2D side scroller from the ’80s? How about a badass 8-bit shoot’em up 2D side scroller that also goes vertical and throws a couple pseudo 3D dungeons into the mix?

Plus, this has pretty cool boss battles with bosses that look badass. And for something that just involves running, gunning and jumping, the game’s design doesn’t make it feel repetitive.

Konami were most definitely on their A-game in the ’80s, especially in the coin-op arcade market. This was originally an arcade game but it’s this port to the original Nintendo Entertainment System that is most remembered. In fact, I’d say that this game was beloved by a generation and for good reason.

The NES version is well designed, performs great and it runs pretty damn smoothly. Also, the controls are very good, as are the in-game physics. I also dig the hell out of the game’s music.

I love Contra and even if it is near impossible to beat without the infamous Konami Code, I would play through this game multiple times in a row, as a kid.

In 2019, this is still one of my favorite classic NES games to fire up on my emulator. I still play this thing at least once a month.

Plus, Contra evolved into a series with sequels that were also pretty good. Maybe not as iconic, but each entry brought something new to the series.

But it is this one, the original, that still stands tall and is, frankly, one of the best Nintendo games ever made.

Rating: 8.75/10
Pairs well with: other side scrolling action games for the classic Nintendo, which narrows it down to about 8 dozen games.