Comic Review: X-Men: Second Coming

Published: June 22nd, 2011
Written by: Craig Kyle, Christopher Yost, Matt Fraction, Zeb Wells, Mike Carey
Art by: David Finch, Terry Dodson, Ibraim Roberson, Greg Land, Mike Choi, Rachel Dodson, Sonia Oback

Marvel Comics, 360 Pages

Review:

I went into this thinking that I would like it for the most part. The events that precede it were pretty good reads. What I didn’t expect was to be blown away. But in the end, I have to say, this was one of the absolute best X-Men crossover events that I have ever experienced. Seriously, this was nothing short of superb.

More than anything, this story made me love Cable more than ever and it got me to love Hope Summers, who I would say is one of the best characters to come out of the last decade, even though she previously appeared as a baby before this in Messiah Complex.

This had a lot going on in the story but there was room for it all. Plus, all the key players were well balanced throughout and it gave most of the top characters a real purpose and mission.

There are real consequences in this story, as some key X-Men figures die. Granted, one could argue that those consequences are never real because no one truly dies in comics and the two biggest victims of this story are already alive and well, once again. But despite that, it felt like a real blow within this narrative. It didn’t lose its impact knowing that they’d eventually be back.

Second Coming carries all the doom and gloom of Messiah Complex over and it brings more doom and gloom but it ends in a way that finally sees a glimmer of “hope” appear in the darkest time of the X-Men franchise. I don’t want to spoil too much because I’d rather people give this a read.

Being that this is a crossover event, there is a mix of art styles. All of it works for me though, even if there are noticeable style shifts from chapter to chapter. Ultimately, the tone stays about the same from beginning to end.

This is a fairly long read but none of it is boring or filler. It moves at a brisk pace, keeps you engaged and makes you cheer for these heroes in a way that you haven’t since the early ’90s.

Rating: 10/10
Pairs well with: the stories that precede it: Avengers Disassembled, House of M and X-Men: The Messiah Complex, as well as the one this leads up to: Avengers Vs. X-Men.

Comic Review: New Mutants: Back to School – The Complete Collection

Published: 2003-2004 (originally published)
Written by: Chris Claremont, Nunzio DeFilippis, Christina Weir
Art by: various

Marvel Comics, 350 Pages

Review:

The New Mutants was one of my first loves in comic books. I discovered it at a pretty early age and loved it, along with the Chris Claremont era of the X-Men. So I wanted to check out this series from 2003-2004. I had put it off for a long time but with it being free for Comixology Unlimited members, I finally decided to give it a read.

All this did was disappoint me though. And man, it was a really long read at 350 pages. This collection covers the whole run of the relaunched series, plus some other comics that tie into the story.

This focuses on the formation of a new team of mutant youngsters, as opposed to bringing the original team back together. The cover was severely misleading as I wanted to read the adventures of that team. All the characters on the cover don’t even come together until the last issue in this collection and even then, it’s way too late and doesn’t do much to salvage the complete boredom I felt for everything before it.

10-20 percent of this giant collection features actual action. The rest of it is just talking and talking and talking and talking. And even with 80-90 percent of this being dialogue, I don’t really care about any of these characters and there is no emotional weight to anything that happens between the covers.

Even if you are a hardcore New Mutants fan, you can ignore this completely and not miss anything. If you are a Dani Moonstar fan, I guess you might want to read it, simply for the fact that she is a big part of this slow, boring story.

Rating: 3.5/10
Pairs well with: more modern X-Men and New Mutants comics.

Comic Review: Spider-Man: Blue

Published: July 27th, 2011
Written by: Jeph Loeb
Art by: Tim Sale

Marvel Comics, 137 Pages

Review:

Other than the Hulk one, I’ve really loved the color themed series of titles that Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale did for Marvel. This is the last of the four that I have read and am now reviewing.

Spider-Man: Blue was damn good. It really captured the spirit of classic Spidey and even though it had a good amount of action and superhero fun, the focal point of this story was Peter Parker’s love for Gwen Stacy but also his blossoming love for his eventual wife, Mary Jane Watson.

This throws a good array of villains at the hero and all of them serve more than a superficial purpose. Kraven the Hunter is the big bad by the end of the story and his threat and how it grows throughout the pages of this miniseries flows really well with the narrative surrounding Peter Parker’s personal life.

Loeb and Sale are just a spectacular team and their talents are on full display here. While I still prefer their Batman work, all of which are real classics in the medium, these Marvel books are some of the best works to come out of the publisher in the last decade or so.

These stories understand the characters, their motivations and the art style makes them feel like you are going back to yesteryear.

Spider-Man: Blue is a fine read and it may even hit you in the feels.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: The other color themed books that Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale did for Marvel.

Comic Review: X-Men/Alpha Flight (1998 Series)

Published: 1998
Written by: John Cassaday, Ben Raab
Art by: John Cassaday, Liquid! (cover)

Marvel Comics, 64 Pages

Review:

I wasn’t expecting much from this two-issue story arc but I was pleasantly surprised by how fun this was.

I love the X-Men and I love Alpha Flight. I especially love when they come together.

In this story we see the X-Men get captured by Baron Strucker and Hydra. Alpha Flight then goes in to save them.

I didn’t realize that this was a 1998 story when I first read it, as the version on Comixology listed it as 2016. So at first I thought it was a cool throwback because it had a very ’90s art style.

This is also the second X-Men/Alpha Flight team up mini-miniseries. I have read and owned the first one for years now. I don’t remember how good that one was but if it’s on par with this, that’d be great.

For a short story that didn’t have much room to breathe, this was a good, fun comic that reminded me why I loved these two teams back in the ’80s and ’90s.

Alpha Flight needs more love, people.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other ’90s X-Men and Alpha Flight stories.

Comic Review: Man Without Fear

Published: January 2nd, 2019 – January 30th, 2019
Written by: Jed MacKay
Art by: various, Kyle Hotz (covers)

Marvel Comics, 123 Pages

Review:

I was a bit depressed when Charles Soule’s run on Daredevil came to an end but there was a silver lining as Chip Zdarsky would be taking over. Zdarsky has been on his A-game lately and I think that he’ll be a good fit on the title.

However, between the two runs, there was this miniseries, which is a bridge between them.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this five issue series but even though it started out a bit slow, each issue built off of the one before it and I was pleasantly surprised by the end result.

This starts with Matt Murdock a.k.a. Daredevil in a coma. Each issue sees a character or a group of characters from his past come into his hospital room to visit but to also add some good emotional context to what Matt is going through. By the end of it, he is ready to put the mask back on and get to work.

The story was a slow build but man, it worked really well and it did it’s primary job very effectively. That job was to bridge the gap and generate real interest in the next chapter of Daredevil‘s long legacy.

Several artists worked on the book but the art was all done pretty consistently. The covers by Kyle Hotz really made these books look superb and I picked them all up because sometimes I buy comics just for the art on the cover. But I’m glad that this wasn’t just a collection of nice covers and that the contents within entertained me.

There isn’t a whole lot of action here due to Daredevil’s physical status but the story does have real energy and we do get to see Matt subconsciously fight his demons in a physical sense.

Man Without Fear is definitely a Daredevil story worth reading for fans of the character and for those looking forward to what’s on the horizon.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: the Charles Soule Daredevil run before this and the new Chip Zdarsky run after.

Book Review: ‘Comic Wars: How Two Tycoons Battled Over the Marvel Comics Empire–And Both Lost’ by Dan Raviv

Comic Wars was a pretty interesting read, as I’ve always liked books about business and corporate histories. What made it even more interesting was that it covered a really dark time in the history of Marvel Comics.

The gist of this tale is told around Marvel Entertainment’s bankruptcy near the turn of the century. It goes through all of the steps, bad business decisions and market changes that led to shit figuratively hitting the fan at the “House of Ideas”.

Being that I was a huge fan of Marvel’s toyline done by Toy Biz, I found all that stuff really interesting. Also, this was cool to read because when Marvel really started to suffer, I was actually at a place in my life where I wasn’t reading comics very often and I had no idea that the industry, as a whole, was struggling. As far as I knew, everything was still booming and it wasn’t until a few years later when Marvel started selling off the film rights of their flagship characters that I saw the writing on the wall.

This book is thorough, captivating and damn informative.

This would actually be a great documentary if someone decided to adapt this true tale into a film with interviews featuring all the key players in the story.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other books about the comic industry from the last few decades.

Comic Review: Spider-Men II

Published: March 21st, 2018
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Sara Pichelli

Marvel Comics, 104 Pages

Review:

I had really enjoyed Brian Michael Bendis’ run with the Miles Morales version of Spider-Man since he debuted. I also liked the first Spider-Men event, which brought Miles and Peter Parker together for the first time. So I had pretty high hopes for this sequel series and Bendis’ swansong before leaving Marvel for DC Comics.

Sadly, this was a letdown.

Now it wasn’t terrible but it was just okay. But this should have maintained the momentum and the energy that the previous Miles Morales stories had.

Ultimately, Spider-Men II took the wind out of the sails and brought this once fun to read character back down to Earth in the most Brian Michael Bendis way possible. And I don’t say that to be trendy and trash Bendis’ work like so many others but this is a prime example of what his harsher critics can point to and say, “See, Bendis gonna Bendis!”

This tried to be clever and give fans a swerve with an alternate, darker version of Miles Morales but it fell flat. In the end, the story was a total dud, lacking in a healthy amount of action and any sort of depth or solid character development. It read more like a love letter between “evil” Miles and the Kingpin than something worthy of bringing the two most popular Spider-Men together again.

Miles Morales debuted with a hell of a bang. But for Bendis’ last story for the great character he created, Miles went out with a whimper.

But hey, Sara Pichelli’s art was absolutely top notch, beautiful and up to her great standard. So, at least I got to enjoy the overall look of this book.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Miles Morales stories by Brian Michael Bendis but they’re all better than this one.