Comic Review: Captain America: Winter Soldier, Vol. 2

Published: October 11th, 2006
Written by: Ed Brubaker
Art by: Steve Epting, Michael Lark, Mike Perkins

Marvel Comics, 136 Pages

Review:

This was a pretty good second half to the original Winter Soldier story. I liked the first half a bit more though. But I think that’s because reading this lacked tension, as I knew that Winter Soldier was actually Bucky and that he’d come around and start to see the light.

That lack of tension is my fault for taking so long to read this story. It’s certainly not Brubaker’s fault and I’m sure this was tense as hell for those that read it for the first time in 2006 without any knowledge of the Winter Soldier character.

I like that Brubaker does spend a good amount of time flashbacking to World War II and the Invaders era. The context was nice and the parallels between Cap and Bucky’s lives then and now was well done.

This story also adds in Falcon and Iron Man, which obviously influenced the MCU films that saw these two characters chime in on Cap’s relationship with Winter Soldier.

Like the previous volume, the art was really good and Brubaker truly benefits from having solid artists on his Captain America books, as they definitely enhance the atmosphere and tone of the plot in the right way.

For Cap fans who haven’t read the Brubaker run, you’re doing yourselves a disservice. Hell, for fans of just the movies, this is definitely worth checking out just to understand the depth of these characters’ bond.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: the rest of Ed Brubaker’s Captain America run.

Comic Review: Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre – One-Shot

Published: July 24th, 2019
Written by: Cullen Bunn
Art by: Alberto Jiminez Albuquerque, Joshua Cassara, Declan Shalvey (cover)

Marvel Comics, 32 Pages

Review:

I’ve lost count of how many Web of Venom one-shots there have been over the last year but I’ve enjoyed all of them. They tie directly to Donny Cates’ run on Venom, which started just over a year ago, as well as his upcoming Absolute Carnage mega event.

What I liked about this one is that it featured Mania, a symbiote character that’s been missing from Marvel since the death of Flash Thomspon. She was tied to Flash while he was Venom and because of that, became a symbiote herself.

I’ve always dug Mania, so seeing her come back and be involved, in some way, with this mega event is kind of cool.

This sees Carnage, back from oblivion, as he is hunting down all the symbiote pieces on Earth. This puts Mania in his crosshairs.

Overall, this story does a good job of reestablishing Mania into the Marvel mythos and it also helps add another plot thread to the Absolute Carange event.

I thought Cullen Bunn did a good job on the writing, tying this to a much bigger tapestry. I was a fan of the art too.

Ultimately, I don’t give a shit about big comic book events anymore. However, the groundwork that’s been laid for a year, leading up to Carnage’s massive return, has been pretty damn good and at least has me interested in what’s to come over the next few months.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: the recent Donny Cates Venom series and its Web of Venom spinoffs.

Vids I Dig 072: Comic Tropes: X-Statix: Superhero Celebrity Satire

From Comic Tropes’ YouTube description: In 2001, writer Peter Milligan and artist Mike Allred teamed up with a completely new take on X-Force which would go on to be retitled X-Statix. It was a look at a team of mutants who were also celebrities. This episode looks at how that works and some of the common techniques of Milligan and Allred.

Comic Review: Uncanny X-Force, Vol. 1: The Apocalypse Solution

Published: September 28th, 2011
Written by: Rick Remender
Art by: Leonardo Manco, Jerome Opena

Marvel Comics, 108 Pages

Review:

I’ve wanted to pick up Rick Remender’s run on X-Force for a long time. But there are so many comics I want to read that the mountain is always growing. I finally got around to this one though, the first of seven volumes and a good setup for the series.

If you’ve read the X-Force series where the team becomes a black ops squad for Cyclops, handling the really dark shit that the X-Men can’t, then you should know what you’re getting into here. This picks up after that run but Remender shuffles the group’s members and makes things more interesting.

Where I’ve been critical of Deadpool in the past, these are the types of stories that he tends to flourish in. He is still comedic and has his quips but it works better having him lighten the dark mood than just starring in his own comic and giving us straight comedy or superhero parody.

I really like the duality that is explored here with Warren Worthington, as he phases between his Angel and Archangel personas and because of that, has real trust issues in his relationship with Psylocke.

This team also features Wolverine in a leadership role, as well as Fantomex, who I honestly don’t know. But he seems like an interesting enough character and I’m looking forward to learning more about him.

The threat in this story sees the emergence of a new Four Horsemen of the Apoclypse, as X-Men baddie Apocalypse has returned in an interesting form.

Where this is going is hard to tell and this volume doesn’t work as its own story. It reads like the first chapter to a much larger book. And while that may irritate some people that want a resolution within the covers of their trade paperbacks, I’m committed to seeing this whole series through.

That being said, this lays the groundwork without giving you too much of an idea as to what’s on the horizon. I hope the surprise is a pleasant one.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: the rest of Rick Remender’s Uncanny X-Force run.

Comic Review: Star Wars: Shattered Empire

Published: November 18th, 2015
Written by: Greg Rucka, Greg Pak
Art by: Marco Checchetto, Chris Sprouse
Based on: Star Wars by George Lucas

Marvel Comics, 123 Pages

Review:

This came out just before the first Disney Star Wars movie, The Force Awakens. It was meant to bridge the gap between Return of the Jedi and the new sequel trilogy.

It’s a complete failure of storytelling though.

Does it bridge the gap? Sort of, I guess.

The story follows the events of the Battle of Endor but focuses on Poe Dameron’s mom, a character we’ve never heard of but is suddenly a hero known by everyone, even Luke Skywalker who basically bows before her presence, alerting us of a character propped up as an infallible Mary Sue. And I hate having to go there but Mama Dameron is the exact definition of a Mary Sue character.

Then she goes on an adventure with Leia to Naboo and they meet the current Queen of Naboo. Then there are only three starfighters, so these three women, two of which are fucking royalty, take off into space to fight a fleet of Imperial Star Destroyers all on their own.

This is heavy handed girl power nonsense and a blight on Star Wars, which is why I don’t consider this Disney bullshit to be canon. It’s not that having strong, heroic women is the problem, it’s that they’re thrown into situations that are nonsensical and pointless other than making some sort of social or political statement.

Frankly, Star Wars: Shattered Empire is a prime example of why modern Marvel has been so widely criticized. I like to give each comic a fair shot and look at them as individual bodies of work judged on their own merits but this comic makes it pretty damn clear why the mainstream comic book industry is shrinking and has nealt lost its entire audience.

This was absolute horseshit.

But the art was really good, to be fair.

Rating: 2.5/10
Pairs well with: I guess the other recent Marvel Star Wars comics and the Disney sequel films.

Vids I Dig 068: Literature Devil: Is Comicsgate Wrong? (In 4 Parts)

From Literature Devil’s YouTube description (Part 1): ComicsGate claims that modern Marvel’s diversity-focused comics are far inferior to the works of the past. Are they blinded by hate and nostalgia or do they have a point?

From Literature Devil’s YouTube description (Part 2): So maybe Diversity Marvel isn’t about superhero battles or heroes fighting villains. Maybe it’s about character development. Let’s try tackling this question from a different angle.

From Literature Devil’s YouTube description (Part 3): Before we get into the grand finale of Is Comicsgate Wrong? I went ahead and addressed the most interesting counter-arguments sent my way. Watch to the end… I’ve tossed in a little hint on what the FINAL BATTLE will cover.

From Literature Devil’s YouTube description (Part 4): All things come to an end. One last battle to see which side is right and which side is wrong. Also, special announcements at the end.

Comic Review: Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt

Published: October, 1987 – November, 1987
Written by: J.M. DeMatteis
Art by: Mike Zeck

Marvel Comics, 143 Pages

Review:

Kraven’s Last Hunt is considered to be one of the best Spider-Man story arcs ever written. I’ve gotta say that I agree with that assessment and frankly, it’s near perfect minus a few minor things that hinder it.

The art by Mike Zeck is superb though. And even if the story wasn’t as exceptional as it is, the art in this book really takes it to another level due to its grittiness.

This story came out at the end of Spider-Man’s black costume era. The fact that he’s wearing that costume in this story really adds to the tone and gives this a brooding atmosphere that it wouldn’t have had were he wearing his traditional blue and red outfit.

For Kraven fans, this is a must read, as it’s the most important story to feature the character. It also sees him get the best of Spider-Man, by burying him alive for weeks, as he takes over the mantle, becoming a “superior Spider-Man”. So really, Dan Slott through Doctor Octopus pretty much just recycled this concept with his Superior Spider-Man comic book series. But I can’t knock Slott for that, as I enjoyed the series and he definitely made it his own.

Getting back to this story, it also features the minor villain Vermin. The Vermin stuff is very important to the plot but I’ve never been a fan of the character, as he’s pretty one note and generic. Vermin’s inclusion is one of the things I wasn’t keen on in the story but they do include him in a way that makes sense and enriches the story overall. I feel like a different angle would’ve been better though, as so much time is devoted to the character that it detracts from the larger, much better story. Frankly, I just want this to be 100 percent Kraven.

This six issue arc ends in a pretty dark place but it’s almost a perfect conclusion to this rich story. And in a lot of ways, it foreshadows the darkness that is soon to come into Spider-Man’s life in the form of Venom.

Kraven’s Last Hunt absolutely deserves its praise. It’s a true high point to one of the best eras in Spider-Man lore. It’s also one of the reasons I became a lifelong fan of Marvel’s most popular hero.

Rating: 9.75/10
Pairs well with: late ’80s Spider-Man comics, especially the David Michelinie/Todd McFarlane era on The Amazing Spider-Man.