Comic Review: Lone Wolf

Published: March, 2019
Written by: Doug Garrett
Art by: Jeff Lasley, David AJ Berner, Eugen Betivu

Gravestone Press, 22 Pages

Review:

I backed this comic book on Indiegogo a few months ago and it’s creator Doug Garrett seems like a cool guy. So I was really excited to find this in my mail box, last week.

This is the first issue of what is to be a bigger story arc. I’m not sure if this is a miniseries or if Garrett has a lengthier run in mind.

For a first issue, it does its job pretty effectively. We meet the main character, learn and understand his backstory and we get to see what sort of world he lives in. I don’t want to give too much of the plot away, as I believe you can still order this and it’s definitely worth the price tag when compared to other crowd funding indie comic campaigns out there.

I really dug the art style and it does wonders setting the tone for the narrative. It has a raw, gritty look to it but it is done with skill and certainly doesn’t look amateur, rushed or below the typical indie standard.

I have to be pretty discriminatory, as new crowd funded comics pop up on Indiegogo and Kickstarter, daily. But for the price point and for how Garrett interacts with his potential customers, I wanted to support this. I have no buyer’s remorse and if anything, I look forward to what Garrett releases next.

Really, there isn’t much I can pick apart about this comic and usually with crowd funded stuff, there’s a lot that I can critique. All I can say, which isn’t really even negative, is that this looks really good for a first effort, much better than a lot of first effort indie books, and Garrett and his creative team are only going to improve from here.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: other recent crowd funded releases.

Comic Review: Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War

Published: April 20th, 2016
Written by: Mike Johnson
Art by: Angel Hernandez, Stephen Molnar
Based on: Star Trek by Gene Roddenberry, characters from DC Comics

IDW Publishing, DC Comics, 156 Pages

Review:

I hoped this would be a cool comic book series but I already found it a bit of an eye roller when I saw that they used the Kelvin timeline cast, as opposed to the likeness and style of the original cast and it’s version of Star Trek.

Anyway, I don’t hate the Kelvin movies, as you may know after reading my recent reviews on those films. However, why use Kelvin shit if you don’t have to?

So Ganthet dies and with his death, he rips a hole in spacetime. This conveniently brings several Lantern rings into the Star Trek Kelvin universe. The Enterprise crew finds Ganthet’s corpse and the rings and pretty quickly the rings come to life and choose their bearers. One of which is General Chang of the Klingon Empire, in what would be his first Kelvin timeline appearance. Some may remember him as the great villain from Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

This story rehashes concepts from the Blackest Night storyline and just brings those concepts into the Kelvin timeline. We have multiple Lantern villains show up like Sinestro, Atrocitus and Larfleeze. We also get new evil ring bearers: a Romulan and a Gorn. But the biggest twist with the Blackest Night concept is when Black Lantern leader Nekron resurrects all the dead citizens of Vulcan, including Spock’s mother. While it was trying to make a big emotional impact on the reader, it felt cheap and pretty cheesy.

I had sincerely hoped that seeing two of my favorite franchises come together would be a fun story. This just felt like it was a lowest common denominator attempt at cashing in on yet another crossover.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: its sequel, as well as Planet of the Apes/Green Lantern and Star Trek/Planet of the Apes.

Talking Pulp’s Pull List – 2nd Quarter, 2019

This is my personal pull list as it stands, right now. From month to month it changes, as I read a lot of limited series stuff but I figured that doing a quarterly update would be cool for my readers that keep up with current comics.

So this is what I have my local comic shop pull for me each month, most of which I will review every time I get to the end of a story arc.

I’ve broken them out by publisher and alphabetized the list to make it flow easier.

And if there’s anything you like that I’m not reading, tell me in the comments.

But, as you can see, my list keeps shrinking.

Marvel Comics:
-Conan the Barbarian
-Daredevil
-Dead Man Logan
-Guardians of the Galaxy
-The Immortal Hulk
-The Punisher
-The Savage Sword of Conan
-Spider-Man: Life Story
-Symbiote Spider-Man (upcoming)
-Venom
-Wolverine: The Long Night
-X-Force

DC Comics:
-Batgirl
-Deathstroke
-Detective Comics
-Doomsday Clock
-Justice League Dark
-Justice League Odyssey
-Red Hood: Outlaw
-The Silencer

Dynamite Entertainment:
-Battlestar Galactica Classic
-Red Sonja
-The Shape of Elvira

Image Comics:
-Spawn

Valiant Comics:
-Bloodshot: Rising Spirit

Comic Review: Hellboy, Vol. 1: Seed of Destruction

Published: 1994
Written by: John Byrne, Mike Mignola
Art by: Mike Mignola

Dark Horse Comics, 130 Pages

Review:

It’s been a really long time since I have picked up a Hellboy comic, even though I’ve been a massive fan of the character since the ’90s. This was also the first time that I read his debut story.

This four issue story arc was the basis for the plot of the first Hellboy film. While it’s not the exact same story, it features Rasputin as the villain, as well as large, tentacled, Lovecraftian monsters and a very similar origin story for the title character.

While it may sound as if I am trying to oversell this, Hellboy: Seed of Destruction is perfection in the comic book medium.

Featuring the incredible duo of comic book legends John Byrne and Mike Mignola, this earliest Hellboy story was superb on every level. The writing was terrific, the dialogue was fantastic and Mignola’s art style creates a perfect tone for this tale.

When things are this good, I want others to experience them fresh. So I don’t want to spoil too much and would rather others go pick this up, read it and be as surprised and impressed by it as I was.

Now this may not be everyone’s cup of tea and my opinions are my own but I think it’d be hard to deny that this is a solid comic book, through and through, and it does exactly what it set out to achieve.

That being said, I can’t wait to jump into volume two.

Rating: 10/10
Pairs well with: other Hellboy and B.P.R.D. related comics.

Comic Review: Strike!

Published: 1987-1988
Written by: Chuck Dixon
Art by: Tom Lyle, Romeo Tanghal, Don Gidley

Eclipse Comics, 203 Pages

Review:

My review here covers Strike! issues 1 through 6, as well as the Strike! Vs. Sgt. Strike one-shot that capped off the story.

I wanted to read this, as I used to see Eclipse titles a lot when I was really young but I never picked them up because I was a Marvel/DC snob. Also, I’m a fan of Chuck Dixon and this was something he wrote early in his career before achieving greatness with BatmanThe Punisher and his epic run on G.I. Joe, a few years ago.

This comic was entertaining, energetic and colorful. I really liked it and it made me disappointed in my nine year-old self for sleeping on the indies in an era where there were so many great titles to choose from outside of BatmanSpider-ManX-Men and G.I. Joe.

The story follows a teenager living in the harshest parts of Baltimore. One of his best friends has become a major drug dealer in the community and other gangs tend to be a problem for the law abiding good people of the neighborhood. When the teen finds a special belt, hidden in his attic, it gives him super strength and physical invulnerability. Initially, he uses his powers to steal money from his drug dealer friend in an effort to better his and his mother’s lives. But ultimately, he grows, matures and becomes a hero.

The comic is an attempt at creating a modern adaptation of a public domain comic book character from the 1940s: Sgt. Strike. This was given a youthful, urban twist and some of the dialogue is kind of cringy in 2019 with the over the top street slang and for some pages having “faggot” on them every other panel. However, this is also a product of its time and colorful, expletive language helped sell comics to kids that mostly just had family friendly superheroes to choose from.

Strike! is a fun, late ’80s, action, crime, sci-fi story. There are gangsters, aliens and flashback stories to World War II featuring the original Sgt. Strike. It’s maybe even a bit ahead of its time as it sort of fits with the ’90s “extreme” edgy boy shit that ran rampant through comics a few years later.

What this made me realize, is that I need to pickup and review more titles from Eclipse.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other comics from Eclipse.

Film Review: American Splendor (2003)

Release Date: January 20th, 2003 (Sundance)
Directed by: Shari Springer Berman, Robert Pulcini
Written by: Shari Springer Berman, Robert Pulcini
Based on: American Splendor and Our Cancer Year by Harvey Pekar
Music by: Mark Suozzo
Cast: Paul Giamatti, Hope Davis, Judah Friedlander, James Urbaniak, Donal Logue, Molly Shannon, Josh Hutcherson, Harvey Pekar, Joyce Brabner, Toby Radloff

Good Machine, Dark Horse Entertainment, Fine Line Features, HBO Films, 101 Minutes

Review:

“Why does everything in my life have to be such a complicated disaster?” – Joyce Brabner

Even though I grew up burying my head in comic books, I wasn’t really aware of Harvey Pekar until my late ’20s. Initially, his comic book style wasn’t something I sought out. I was more into superhero comics and sword and sorcery style fantasy epics.

However, I would say that I found Pekar (and Robert Crumb) at the right time in my life. Both men’s work captivated me and spoke to me in a very human but amusing way. Crumb was attractive to my deviant sensibilities, while Pekar spoke to that cynical observational part of myself that’s always watching and analyzing the shit show around me.

I’ve seen a lot of Pekar in interviews and things over the years and I’ve got to say that Paul Giamatti’s performance as Harvey Pekar is fantastic. While he might not exactly look like Harvey, which is actually joked about within this film in a fourth wall breaking critique by Pekar himself, Giamatti just captured the right type of charm and charisma and did this role justice.

Additionally, Judah Friedlander was absolutely spectacular as Pekar’s best bud Toby Radloff. Friedlander was so good, in fact, that even though I saw his name in the credits, I didn’t realize that it was him playing Toby until really late in the film.

All the other performances are also great. Especially Hope Davis as Joyce, Harvey’s wife, and James Urbaniak, who played Robert Crumb in a few key scenes.

The film covers the important parts of Pekar’s adult life quite well. It’s a film that has a lot of time pass in its 101 minutes but nothing feels rushed and every scene seems pretty vital, as the narrative hits the points it needs to in showcasing what was most important.

For someone that’s a professional creative and pretty grumpy on most days, it was easy for me to relate to Pekar and this film. It was a moving picture that tells a sweet story, even if the main character isn’t someone that would be likable by most people on a first impression.

Rating: 8.75/10
Pairs well with: Crumb and Basquiat.