Comic Review: Planet of the Apes: Visionaries

Published: August 22nd, 2018
Written by: Dana Gould
Art by: Chad Lewis, Marcelo Costa, Darrin Moore, Miguel Muerto, Pablo Rivera (cover)
Based on: Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle, the original 1968 film’s script by Rod Sterling

BOOM! Studios, 138 Pages

Review:

Man, I dug this a lot more than I thought I would, as a lot of similar comics that are based on different takes of famous stories or adapted from first draft scripts have fared fairly poorly.

Comedian, Dana Gould, took the first draft Rod Sterling script for the 1968 Planet of the Apes movie and crafted something really cool. And if I may be so bold, I kind of like this story better than the one that became the Charlton Heston-led picture.

It’s easy to see why this script was greatly modified, though, as a film made from this script would’ve cost a lot more to make and would’ve required more effects work. Reason being, they would’ve had to make costumes and prosthetics for more ape characters just to populate the background, as this mostly takes place in an urban metropolis.

What’s cool about this is that you can see the things they took from this draft of the script and eventually used for the third Apes film, which saw a few apes arrive on our Earth. So some of the cooler elements of this script were eventually filmed, the only real difference was that roles between the human and ape characters were reversed, which still saved the studio from spending more money on effects, as they only needed two ape characters for those scenes.

Apart from the setting and the apes living in a modern Earth type world, the only other major change is that the protagonist dies at the end. The ending, apart from the death, is essentially the same with the reveal of the destroyed Statue of Liberty.

I should also point out that the art in this was really good and it captured the tone well. The book looked better than most of the comics put out by the big two over the last few years.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: other Planet of the Apes comics, as well as other comics based off of first draft scripts or novels that differ from their movies.

Comic Review: Negan Lives! – One-Shot

Published: July 1st, 2020
Written by: Robert Kirkman
Art by: Charlie Adlard

Image Comics, 36 Pages

Review:

Even though The Walking Dead comic series ended a year ago, I always figured that we’d get comics in the future.

Hopefully, this one-shot isn’t the last but I don’t think it will be. I’m not sure what Robert Kirkman’s plan is, if there even is any, but I think that stories will continue to pop into his head every now and then.

This story takes place somewhere between the time where Negan left the comic series and its finale. It shows Negan living on his own where a girl stumbles into his homestead. Negan knows that its an obvious setup and is just kind of waiting for some bad guys to show up and try to take his shit.

They do and like everyone else, they don’t kill Negan and end up paying for it with their lives.

Being that this is just a one-shot, it’s a short, simple story that is kind of similar to the episodes of the show that focus on one character for an hour. It doesn’t really move anything forward or effect the larger comic series.

Still, it was a good read and it was cool peaking in on the Negan character once again.

I only hope that the ending is a hint at something more to come with Negan or The Walking Dead universe, as a whole.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other Walking Dead comics.

Comic Review: I Kill Giants

Published: 2008-2009
Written by: Joe Kelly
Art by: J.M. Ken Nimura

Image Comics, 221 Pages

Review:

This came and went and I never knew about it until recently when I heard about the film that’s based on it. So before checking out the movie, I figured I’d read the source material first. Plus, it was pretty cheap to pickup on Comixology.

I wasn’t expecting the story to get as serious as it did but at the same time, it’s pretty comedic. Honestly, it has the tone of a manga story and since it also features manga style art, it’s a much more Japanese feeling comic than a Western one.

That being said, I was fairly impressed by it and even if it wasn’t my total cup of tea, I liked the idea of a young girl with a massive hammer kicking the shit out of parasitic giants out to harm her community.

While the main character is strange, she’s likable and for the most part, relatable.

This gets into some heavy things but I also feel like this would really be enjoyed by pre-teens, close to the same age as the kids in the story.

I liked the art, the tone was different and refreshing and the characters kept my interest. Plus, the story was a neat concept that was well executed.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: other American manga-esque comics.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 8: Northampton

Published: June 17th, 2014
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Sophie Campbell
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 105 Pages

Review:

After the first seven volumes in this series, the team needed a breather and some time to reflect on where they’ve come. This was that break, which was fine and, as a reader, allowed me to kick back and read as these characters developed more and dealt with some emotional baggage that needed to be processed.

That’s not to say that there isn’t action here, there certainly is. But for the most part, it takes a bit of a backseat to the characters working through their issues and moving forward in what feels like a new era in the larger TMNT saga.

The story takes place in farm country, as April, Casey and the Turtles take a vacation from their crazy, dangerous lives in New York City. This also gets into more backstory regarding the experiments that led to the creation of the mutants and the sort of business that drives Baxter Stockman’s company. We also see Alopex, a villain thus far, try to turn over a new leaf and repent for her previous sins against the heroes.

I guess the biggest thing here, though, is seeing Leonardo work through his demons, as he’s just recently broke the spell of control that Shredder and the Foot Clan had over him.

This chapter in the saga came with a new artist. At first, I wasn’t feeling it but I quickly got passed it and it worked for me. It just has a different look than the volumes that came out before this one but after it initially being a distraction, it sort of smoothed out as I kept reading.

Overall, this is probably the slowest volume of the lot, so far, but it didn’t feel like filler and the breather felt necessary. Plus, these collections only cover four issues and you can read them very quickly.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Comic Review: Vampirella and the Scarlet Legion

Published: February 29th, 2012
Written by: Joe Harris
Art by: Jose Malaga

Dynamite Entertainment, 135 Pages

Review:

It’s been a little while since I’ve read a Vampirella comic and this one has been in my Comixology queue for quite some time. In fact, it was the oldest title in my queue, so I figured I’d give it a read.

For the most part, this was kind of cool and I liked the whole mythos surrounding The Scarlet Legion and their ties to Vampirella. This also added in some Aztec mysticism, as Vampirella is essentially elevated as a god to the tribe she encounters in the story.

The plot itself is just okay. It’s got a few twists and surprises but a lot of this feels cookie cutter.

And while I mostly like the art, it lacks energy. The character designs and illustrations are pretty solid but nothing feels very dynamic. The colors are decent but a bit wonky at times, as well.

Overall, this is okay but there are better Vampirella stories out there.

Rating: 6/10
Pairs well with: other Vampirella comics from her Dynamite era.

Comic Review: Brand, Vol. 1

Published: July, 2020
Written by: Antonio Brice
Art by: Caanan White

Ikari Press, 52 Pages

Review:

I backed this comic on Indiegogo quite awhile ago and it was a campaign that took a long time to fulfill. But as these things go, as long as I get my comic and I enjoy it, no harm is done.

This definitely impressed me and it exceeded my expectations. I honestly didn’t know much about it but I backed it because Anotnio Brice, the creator, seemed like an alright dude and I really dug the artwork by Caanan White.

This comic looks fucking stunning and it was well worth the wait.

Additionally, the story was interesting, I felt like I got invested in these characters and in the end, I want to see where this goes.

There are a lot of different avenues and characters that the plot introduces and it packs in a lot for just 52 pages. It’s a good mix of the sci-fi superhero genre, as well as crime thrillers and fantastical adventures.

I’m not sure where this could go but it kept my attention and left me wanting more.

The story isn’t self-contained and this is a setup for the next chapter. However, based off of this, I’ll probably back the second volume.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other recent comics by Comicsgate or other successfully crowdfunded indie creators.

Comic Review: Super Harem, Vol. 1

Published: June, 2020
Written by: Matt Wenger
Art by: John Joseph Ball, Farah Nurmaliza

48 Pages

Review:

I backed this because it’s creator seemed like a cool enough guy. Additionally, the premise was intriguing and I wanted to see how the story panned out.

The plot is about a guy who gives superpowers to any woman he has sex with. His former girlfriend became a hero and found herself protecting their city from giant, kaiju-sized monsters. After discovering that her superpowers worked as a lure to attract these monsters, she left the city and her super sperm boyfriend behind.

As the comic starts, the guy gets drunk and has a one night stand that ends with a new girl also getting powers. This obviously creates some issues and things start to quickly spiral out of control.

Like many crowdfunded books, as of late, the story isn’t complete by the end of this volume. It will be continued in a future release.

That’s fine and I was glad to back this, especially since it exceeded the expectations I had for it. My experience with crowdfunded comics has been a really mixed bag. The really bad stuff I haven’t reviewed because I’m not into kicking small creators just trying to ply their trade. 

Wenger impressed, though, and this was a fun, energetic book with solid art, good writing and a well-executed original idea.

I’ll probably back the followup because I’d like to see what happens next. And frankly, repeat business is how you succeed at crowdfunding comics because it means that your project resonated with its audience.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: other recent comics by Comicsgate or other successfully crowdfunded indie creators.

Comic Review: Michael Allred’s Madman, Vol. 2

Published: March 11th, 2009
Written by: Mike Allred, Frank Miller
Art by: Mike Allred, Laura Allred

Dark Horse, Image Comics (reprint), 323 Pages

Review:

Michael Allred created something special, unique, quirky and cool with Madman. And since I own a lot of the floppies from the earliest issues, I’ve wanted to revisit them from the beginning. While I don’t have them all, I did pick up the collected editions during a sale on Comixology.

I really enjoyed the first volume, so I figured that reading the second one was long overdue.

This sort of picks up where that one left off and this collection covers multiple story arcs but everything here happens in order and builds off of the constantly evolving narrative.

These issues came out once the series moved from Tundra to Dark Horse. What’s cool about that is that this was able to have a cameo by Mike Mignola’s Hellboy. It’s really neat seeing the two characters come together, even though it just happens in one issue and is short-lived. I’m not sure if this series has anymore minor crossovers in the following volumes but I liked seeing Allred and Mignola’s universes overlap, even if it was just briefly.

The art in this one feels more crisp and more polished. The first volume was initially in black and white but this one comes to life with incredibly vibrant colors that just work so well with the line art and give this a cool, pulpy look that made it stand out from what was the norm in the ’90s when this was originally produced. That’s really what made me take notice of the original floppy copies back then.

In the end, this expands the mythos and made me love this world even more. This series is hilarious and strange in the best way possible.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: the other early Madman collections, as well as SCUD: The Disposable Assassin, the Hellboy and B.P.R.D. comics and The Goon.

Comic Review: USAssassin, Book I: Old Habits…

Published: June, 2020
Written by: Mark Poulton
Art by: Mike McMahon

Haunted Pizza, 80 Pages

Review:

I probably wouldn’t have backed this on Indiegogo but after getting a copy for free with Graveyard Shift: Volume II and digging the hell out of it, I’ll most likely back the followup volume.

In fact, I enjoyed this more than Mark Poulton’s Graveyard Shift comics, as it channels the same sort of vibe as the two most recent runs on DC Comics’ Deathstroke, which have been some of my favorite comic book titles of the last five-to-ten years.

With the inclusion of the elite soldier squad that turn out to be bad guys, this also had notes of Suicide Squad, which just worked for me. I guess in some sense, it felt like the team we’re introduced to is like a fucked up G.I. Joe where the main character isn’t willing to cross a certain line and thus, draws the ire of his team and its leader.

This was a quick but awesome read and the 80 pages just flew by. I liked the story, I got invested in this new character and I’m optimistic about where this could be headed in the future.

Additionally, I really liked Mike McMahon’s art and this felt like a top notch comic book akin to the better DC Comics titles of the last few years.

This had cool characters, cool character design, a simple but solid story and it’s just my cup of tea.

I already want a refill.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: Mark Poulton’s Graveyard Shift, as well as the modern runs on Deathstroke, Suicide Squad and Red Hood and the Outlaws.