Comic Review: Negan Lives! – One-Shot

Published: July 1st, 2020
Written by: Robert Kirkman
Art by: Charlie Adlard

Image Comics, 36 Pages

Review:

Even though The Walking Dead comic series ended a year ago, I always figured that we’d get comics in the future.

Hopefully, this one-shot isn’t the last but I don’t think it will be. I’m not sure what Robert Kirkman’s plan is, if there even is any, but I think that stories will continue to pop into his head every now and then.

This story takes place somewhere between the time where Negan left the comic series and its finale. It shows Negan living on his own where a girl stumbles into his homestead. Negan knows that its an obvious setup and is just kind of waiting for some bad guys to show up and try to take his shit.

They do and like everyone else, they don’t kill Negan and end up paying for it with their lives.

Being that this is just a one-shot, it’s a short, simple story that is kind of similar to the episodes of the show that focus on one character for an hour. It doesn’t really move anything forward or effect the larger comic series.

Still, it was a good read and it was cool peaking in on the Negan character once again.

I only hope that the ending is a hint at something more to come with Negan or The Walking Dead universe, as a whole.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other Walking Dead comics.

Comic Review: I Kill Giants

Published: 2008-2009
Written by: Joe Kelly
Art by: J.M. Ken Nimura

Image Comics, 221 Pages

Review:

This came and went and I never knew about it until recently when I heard about the film that’s based on it. So before checking out the movie, I figured I’d read the source material first. Plus, it was pretty cheap to pickup on Comixology.

I wasn’t expecting the story to get as serious as it did but at the same time, it’s pretty comedic. Honestly, it has the tone of a manga story and since it also features manga style art, it’s a much more Japanese feeling comic than a Western one.

That being said, I was fairly impressed by it and even if it wasn’t my total cup of tea, I liked the idea of a young girl with a massive hammer kicking the shit out of parasitic giants out to harm her community.

While the main character is strange, she’s likable and for the most part, relatable.

This gets into some heavy things but I also feel like this would really be enjoyed by pre-teens, close to the same age as the kids in the story.

I liked the art, the tone was different and refreshing and the characters kept my interest. Plus, the story was a neat concept that was well executed.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: other American manga-esque comics.

Comic Review: Michael Allred’s Madman, Vol. 2

Published: March 11th, 2009
Written by: Mike Allred, Frank Miller
Art by: Mike Allred, Laura Allred

Dark Horse, Image Comics (reprint), 323 Pages

Review:

Michael Allred created something special, unique, quirky and cool with Madman. And since I own a lot of the floppies from the earliest issues, I’ve wanted to revisit them from the beginning. While I don’t have them all, I did pick up the collected editions during a sale on Comixology.

I really enjoyed the first volume, so I figured that reading the second one was long overdue.

This sort of picks up where that one left off and this collection covers multiple story arcs but everything here happens in order and builds off of the constantly evolving narrative.

These issues came out once the series moved from Tundra to Dark Horse. What’s cool about that is that this was able to have a cameo by Mike Mignola’s Hellboy. It’s really neat seeing the two characters come together, even though it just happens in one issue and is short-lived. I’m not sure if this series has anymore minor crossovers in the following volumes but I liked seeing Allred and Mignola’s universes overlap, even if it was just briefly.

The art in this one feels more crisp and more polished. The first volume was initially in black and white but this one comes to life with incredibly vibrant colors that just work so well with the line art and give this a cool, pulpy look that made it stand out from what was the norm in the ’90s when this was originally produced. That’s really what made me take notice of the original floppy copies back then.

In the end, this expands the mythos and made me love this world even more. This series is hilarious and strange in the best way possible.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: the other early Madman collections, as well as SCUD: The Disposable Assassin, the Hellboy and B.P.R.D. comics and The Goon.

Vids I Dig 379: Comic Tropes: Donny Cates: Writing About Addiction

From Comic Tropes’ YouTube description: Donny Cates is an up and coming young writer at Marvel Comics, writing Venom, Thor, Guardians of the Galaxy and more. This video takes a look at his history interning at Marvel, studying at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and getting his work published at Dark Horse Comics and Image Comics as he broke in. Specifically, this video analyzes the themes Donny Cates writes about which include father issues and addiction issues.

Comic Review: Black and White – Remastered, Vol. 1

Published: December, 2019
Written by: Art Thibert, Pamela Thibert, Taylor Grosso
Art by: Art Thibert, Periya Pillai, Hack Shack Color

Image Comics/Extreme Studios (original run), Hack Shack Studios, 52 Pages

Review:

I had the old issues of Art Thibert’s Black and White back when Image published them in 1993. I barely remembered the series but I did always like Thibert’s art, especially his X-Men stuff.

So when I saw that he was crowdfunding a remastered version of that old creation of his, I figured I’d back it and get reacquainted with these characters.

Overall, this was an energetic and nice read. This version of the book looks really good and it is improved upon.

I wasn’t quite expecting it to end in the middle of the story but I also backed this awhile ago and I might have forgotten that detail. So there is a second volume coming out in the future, which will complete the story. When that happens, I’m not sure, as Thibert is currently working on another project called Chrono Mechanics.

As far as the story goes, I found it pretty interesting but it reads like a lot of the other early Image superhero stuff. It feels as if it doesn’t know where it’s going and it’s trying to find its footing. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as Todd McFarlane’s Spawn was a bit shaky in its early issues. I would definitely say that this is better than Rob Liefeld’s Youngblood, which I always thought was poorly written. So for early Image stuff, I’d say that this is somewhere in the middle.

I liked the characters but I also didn’t feel like I was given enough material to fully understand them, which doesn’t do much in generating excitement over the eventual second volume.

Still, this did a decent job of laying some groundwork for future exploration. However, I’m not sure if Thibert wants to keep this series going or if the second part will just be the actual end of it.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: other early Image and Valiant superhero comics.

Comic Review: Coffin Bound

Published: August 7th, 2019 – November 6th, 2019
Written by: Dan Watters
Art by: Dani, Brad Simpson

Image Comics, 142 Pages

Review:

When I first saw that this series was coming out, I added it to my pull list.

The main reason is that I loved the art style. It’s well drawn with a unique style and the colors reminded me of something very giallo-esque.

Also, the story looked like it was a sort of mashup of the gothic horror and neo-western genres.

Now I absolutely loved the art, which was illustrated by Dani and colored by Brad Simpson. But it’s the story that mostly didn’t work for me.

This comic is full of cool ideas and concepts but I found the story hard to follow and a little too outside of the box that it became distracting and hard to focus on some of the details.

Frankly, I was looking for that piece to grasp onto but I just couldn’t find it and from a narrative standpoint, this fell flat and seemed kind of aimless and as if it were struggling to find itself.

And this is coming from a guy that loves really weird shit.

I honestly don’t know if I’ll give the followup miniseries a shot. I’ll probably wait until I hear some feedback from other people I trust.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: most of the modern Image Comics stuff.

Vids I Dig 156: Strip Panel Naked: A History of Colors on Sean Phillips

 

From Strip Panel Naked’s YouTube description: On this episode I look at how colorists have adapted to Sean Phillips’ work over the years, from Sleeper to Criminal to The Fade Out, Kill or be Killed, and the new Criminal series. Seeing how the search for a more expressionist look finally landed with Jacob Phillips and his painterly approach.