Comic Review: Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War

Published: April 20th, 2016
Written by: Mike Johnson
Art by: Angel Hernandez, Stephen Molnar
Based on: Star Trek by Gene Roddenberry, characters from DC Comics

IDW Publishing, DC Comics, 156 Pages

Review:

I hoped this would be a cool comic book series but I already found it a bit of an eye roller when I saw that they used the Kelvin timeline cast, as opposed to the likeness and style of the original cast and it’s version of Star Trek.

Anyway, I don’t hate the Kelvin movies, as you may know after reading my recent reviews on those films. However, why use Kelvin shit if you don’t have to?

So Ganthet dies and with his death, he rips a hole in spacetime. This conveniently brings several Lantern rings into the Star Trek Kelvin universe. The Enterprise crew finds Ganthet’s corpse and the rings and pretty quickly the rings come to life and choose their bearers. One of which is General Chang of the Klingon Empire, in what would be his first Kelvin timeline appearance. Some may remember him as the great villain from Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

This story rehashes concepts from the Blackest Night storyline and just brings those concepts into the Kelvin timeline. We have multiple Lantern villains show up like Sinestro, Atrocitus and Larfleeze. We also get new evil ring bearers: a Romulan and a Gorn. But the biggest twist with the Blackest Night concept is when Black Lantern leader Nekron resurrects all the dead citizens of Vulcan, including Spock’s mother. While it was trying to make a big emotional impact on the reader, it felt cheap and pretty cheesy.

I had sincerely hoped that seeing two of my favorite franchises come together would be a fun story. This just felt like it was a lowest common denominator attempt at cashing in on yet another crossover.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: its sequel, as well as Planet of the Apes/Green Lantern and Star Trek/Planet of the Apes.

Comic Review: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero: Silent Option

Published: September 19th, 2018 – March 13th, 2019
Written by: Larry Hama, Ryan Ferrier
Art by: Netho Diaz, Kenneth Loh
Based on: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero by Hasbro

IDW Publishing, 151 Pages

Review:

This four-part miniseries is the latest G.I. Joe story from longtime G.I. Joe writer Larry Hama. It is also the first IDW G.I. Joe story that I’ve read in several months, as I was starting to get burnt out on the franchise due to how IDW has handled it since Chuck Dixon and Mike Costa left the series.

Larry Hama is still writing the regular ongoing series that started at Marvel in the early ’80s but it just doesn’t have the same magic it used to and so much has changed for the worse that I don’t much care for Hama’s ongoing continuity even though his work, decades ago, is what initially got me into buying comic books to begin with.

I wanted to check this out, though. The main reason is that I’ve been yearning for a good G.I. Joe story and this miniseries is centered around Helix, a modern character but one I came to love in the IDW rebooted continuity. I know, I know, these multiple continuities can get confusing but I believe that this is technically Helix’s first appearance in the original Hama continuity, so I wanted to see how it played out.

Overall, her story was good but this complete story arc was pretty mundane. I’m an old school fan, so the lack of Cobra in this story sucked, as did the lack of old school Joes. Sure, the story featured Firefly but the villain was generic and just had some red ninjas to do her bidding and on the Joe side we got Alpine and tiny cameos from Hawk, Cutter and Shipwreck but this was pretty much a new Joe team featuring characters that are poor recreations of iconic Joe members.

Hell, we get two new versions of Snake Eyes here but neither of them are even 5 percent as cool as the original. I don’t dig the girl Snake Eyes and it seems like a cheap attempt by IDW at trying to create their own X-23 type of character. For those that don’t know, X-23 was a female clone of Wolverine in Marvel Comics titles.

I thought the art was mostly good and this had a harder edge to it than most of Hama’s G.I. Joe stories, as it dealt with human sex trafficking, but it lacked in badass points when compared to the Dixon and Costa G.I. Joe stories from the IDW reboot continuity.

This wasn’t a complete waste of time but it didn’t do much to motivate me to give G.I. Joe a seventeenth chance.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: any of the Larry Hama G.I. Joe stuff at IDW.

Comic Review: IDW 20/20 – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Published: January 16th, 2019
Written by: Paul Allor
Art by: Dave Wachter
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 33 Pages

Review:

There’s five of these IDW 20/20 comics but this is the third and final one I’m going to read and review. I already checked out the Star Trek and Ghostbusters ones but I don’t have much interest in the ones for Jem and My Little Pony.

This kind of fits the mold of the other two, as it features characters most people love but it doesn’t tell a complelling story that seems to have much purpose outside of the IDW 20/20 gimmick, which sees beloved franchises either flashback or fast forward twenty years.

All of these could have probably been better if they weren’t one-shots and had room to breathe and tell a more coherent story with proper character development and world building.

This takes place in Europe, twenty years into the future where the Turtles pretty much look and act the same. They’re fighting a war against Krang’s alien race and that’s pretty much it. It’s just Turtles fighting a bunch of Krangs, a Technodrome shows up and there’s not much to grab on to or care about.

The art is decent, the action is okay, it entertained me slightly for fifteen minutes but overall, this is a throwaway “elseworlds” tale.

Rating: 5.75/10
Pairs well with: other IDW 20/20 comics, as well as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics.

Comic Review: Star Trek: Countdown

Published: March 25th, 2009
Written by: J. J. Abrams, Mike Johnson, Tim Jones, Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci
Art by: David Messina
Based on: Star Trek by Gene Roddenberry

IDW Publishing, 99 Pages

Review:

This was a kind of cool event leading up to the release of 2009’s unnecessary Star Trek reboot. While I wasn’t a fan of the reboot idea that J. J. Abrams went with, this is still a pretty good tie-in comic that sets the stage for the film and develops its villain’s character, Nero, which the movie didn’t do at all. In fact, this has more depth to the backstory than the film did.

What I liked most about this is we got to see a peek of what the Star Trek universe was like years after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis. And frankly, that’s the movie I wanted over a damn reboot. Star Trek is about the future so please, just keep moving forward, deeper into the future.

Anyway, we get to see the events that drive Nero to madness and why he ends up hating Spock despite starting out as allies. We also get to check in with several of the characters from Star Trek: The Next Generation.

I recently read that the version of Jean-Luc Picard in this specific comic story is what they are looking at in regards to where his character will be in his upcoming Star Trek TV show that’s currently being developed. So that made me want to check this out.

The primary reason why I did read this though, is because I wanted to get the backstory before revisiting 2009’s Star Trek for the first time since it was in theaters.

This was a pretty good comic, it could have actually been a bit longer and more fleshed out but it still set the stage in a good way, tied things to another Trek era and actually got me excited to rewatch a film I wasn’t too enthused about seeing again.

Pretty decent story, really good art and if I’m being honest, I enjoyed this more than the film it was tied to.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other IDW Star Trek comics and the film this precedes, 2009’s Star Trek.

Comic Review: IDW 20/20 – Ghostbusters

Published: January 16th, 2019
Written by: Erik Burnham
Art by: Dan Schoening
Based on: Ghostbusters by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis

IDW Publishing, 40 Pages

Review:

“Who ya gonna call?”

Probably not the Ghostbusters twenty years later, as they’ll just send this other team that isn’t as exciting or as capable as the real deal.

This wasn’t a bad read but it was a pretty boring one. It lacked any sort of energy and maybe I’m supposed to know who these new characters are but I don’t and this doesn’t do much to make me care about them.

I picked this up because I liked the concept of IDW’s 20/20 event, which sees beloved franchises either rewind or fast forward 20 years.

The original Ghostbusters are here but they’re old, moody and pretty much don’t do anything other than show up to make a cameo. They totally could have gone an Old Man Logan route with this and it would have worked better than this did.

The art is okay, the story is just meh and this just feels like it was rushed out just to celebrate IDW’s 20th anniversary.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: other IDW 20/20 comics, as well as Ghostbusters comics.

Comic Review: IDW 20/20 – Star Trek: The Next Generation

Published: January 20th, 2019
Written by: Peter David
Art by: J.K. Woodward
Based on: Star Trek by Gene Roddenberry

IDW Publishing, 36 Pages

Review:

It’s hard to believe that IDW Publishing has been around for twenty years already. In that time, they have published comic books for just about every franchise you can think of. While they’ve had some of their own in-house creations, it’s the intellectual properties that they’ve managed that has been their real bread and butter.

To celebrate their 20th anniversary, they are doing this IDW 20/20 event, which sees many of the IPs they publish getting one-shots that either rewind or fast forward the clock 20 years. The first to come out is this one-shot for Star Trek: The Next Generation.

This one-shot goes back twenty years before The Next Generation television series and shows us an early career mission for Captain Picard. It’s pretty interesting, as it also shows how Picard and his long-time friend, Dr. Beverly Crusher, first met.

What’s really cool about this is that it is written by Peter David, one of the best comic book writers of the last few decades. I’ve always enjoyed David’s work, so seeing him take on the iconic character of Jean-Luc Picard was pretty neat.

Overall, the story was enjoyable and it showed a younger, much more flawed version of Picard. While it’s nice seeing him in a different light, before he evolves into the great leader he becomes, it felt kind of odd, as it comes off as a bit uncharacteristic. I get that he’s younger and probably more of a hot head but certain decisions, despite taking his age into account, seemed very un-Picard-like.

The only thing I wasn’t really a fan of was the art, which was also odd as I’ve liked the work of J.K. Woodward in the past. This comic does that thing that most comics of large IPs do, which is it takes existing reference photos of live action characters and either runs them through a filter or traces them. Here, we are given an art style that looks pretty, as it looks hand painted, but it is so perfect that it looks like PhotoShop filters or just paint enhanced photos. It’s just not a style I’m fond of and everyone from IDW to Marvel is guilty of it. I don’t want to come off as harsh on Woodward but it feels like maybe he was rushed on this project and had to wedge it in between his regular jobs.

In the end, this wasn’t memorable but it was a decent way to kill twenty minutes. I think a story like this could work but it should be something with more depth than you can get out of a one-shot.

Rating: 6.75/10
Pairs well with: other IDW Star Trek comics.

Comic Review: M.A.S.K.: Mobile Armored Strike Kommand, Vol. 2: Rise of V.E.N.O.M.

Published: December 13th, 2017
Written by: Brandon M. Easton, David A. Rodriguez
Art by: Andrew Griffith, Drew Moss, Juan Samu
Based on: M.A.S.K. by Kenner Products

IDW Publishing, 162 Pages

Review:

I really wanted this comic to be good, as I was a huge fan of the toyline when I was a young boy in the ’80s.

There are a few reasons as to why this just doesn’t cut the mustard but the biggest is that it doesn’t know what the hell it needs to be. This is the second and final volume in IDW’s run on the M.A.S.K. property but it sacrifices the property itself by wedging in G.I. Joe and Transformers characters, essentially being a crossover with those other Hasbro franchises.

And when it isn’t focused on other franchises, it just keeps giving us origin stories and nothing with any real meat to it. There is nothing here to make me care about M.A.S.K. on its own.

I feel as if IDW didn’t have any faith in M.A.S.K. and tried to draw more attention to it by throwing these characters into a G.I. Joe and Transformers story. It reminds me of when Marvel would have a new or struggling comic book in the ’90s so they had to throw Spider-Man in it and on the cover in an effort to generate more sales. It isn’t a tactic that worked a quarter of a century ago and it doesn’t work now.

The writing is a mess, the story is all over the place and then the art isn’t very good either. There just isn’t much here worth giving a crap about.

M.A.S.K. vs. G.I. Joe vs. Transformers story could be great but M.A.S.K. needs to swim on its own first.

Rating: 4.75/10
Pairs well with: other M.A.S.K. comics, as well as comics for other Hasbro properties like G.I. Joe and Transformers.