Vids I Dig 379: Comic Tropes: Donny Cates: Writing About Addiction

From Comic Tropes’ YouTube description: Donny Cates is an up and coming young writer at Marvel Comics, writing Venom, Thor, Guardians of the Galaxy and more. This video takes a look at his history interning at Marvel, studying at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and getting his work published at Dark Horse Comics and Image Comics as he broke in. Specifically, this video analyzes the themes Donny Cates writes about which include father issues and addiction issues.

Vids I Dig 376: The 6:05 Superpodcast: Houston Wrestling Special

Taken from Arcadian Vanguard’s YouTube description: The Great Brian Last & David Bixenspan take a look at the history of Houston wrestling. Around clips from past episodes of the Superpodcast, TGBL & Bix talk both about their past experiences living through Superstorm Sandy and let the listeners know how they can help out with the relief efforts for Hurricane Harvey.

Documentary Review: Scream, Queen!: My Nightmare On Elm Street (2019)

Release Date: April 5th, 2019 (Cleveland International Film Festival)
Directed by: Roman Chimienti, Tyler Jensen
Written by: Michael Beard, Clint Catalyst, Leo Herrera, Justin Lockwood
Music by: Alexander Taylor
Cast: Mark Patton, Robert Englund, Jack Sholder, David Chaskin, Robert Rusler, Marshall Bell, Kim Myers, Clu Gulager, JoAnn Willette, Linnea Quigley

The End Productions, 99 Minutes

Review:

I was pretty excited to check this out when I first saw the trailer pop up. I’m a big fan of the Nightmare On Elm Street franchise and I was probably one of the few that actually liked the second movie, before everyone else figured out how “gay” it was.

Granted, I kind of saw the film’s gay subtext for myself and despite this documentary claiming that the gay innuendo was widely known when this came out, I don’t recall many people talking about it until the late ’90s or so. Then again, I was also a young kid and didn’t reach my teen years until the ’90s, so maybe my peers were a bit behind in picking up on the cues.

Anyway, I actually thought that this was just sort of meh. I wouldn’t call this documentary a disappointment but it just didn’t live up to the hype around it and to my own excitement after first hearing about it.

I guess the thing I liked most about it was that I finally got to see what became of Mark Patton, who sort of fell off the face of the Earth for a long time because of what he perceived as backlash from this picture and because he felt that it somewhat exposed him as being gay in a time when there was still a lot of misinformation and fear of AIDS, as well as a lot of homophobia in mainstream Hollywood.

Most importantly, this really goes into Patton’s personal life, showing the viewer what hardships he went through during and after this film. I don’t want to give too much away, as this is worth watching for those who also love the Elm Street movies.

It was also cool seeing the cast of the second Elm Street movie finally reunite after all these years. It’s obvious that Patton’s cast mates cared for him and had missed him during his self-imposed exile from the business.

Overall, this was a decent piece on the man and his life but I wish it would’ve gotten more into the movie itself and actually tried to show it more as a somewhat beloved film by a small minority of Elm Street fans. It was the most bizarre and weird of the Elm Street pictures and that’s without looking at the subliminal homophobia that was written into the script.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: other recent horror movie documentaries.

Vids I Dig 375: Whang!: WWE Attitude Era Censorship

Taken from Justin Whang’s YouTube description: During the late 90s, WWF’s programming grew more mature with the Attitude Era. Although this greatly improved ratings, it drew the attention of the Parents Television Council, an organization that would try to get their advertisers to leave through a letter writing campaign. It backfired spectacularly.

Vids I Dig 372: Defunctland: The History of Disney’s Best Coaster, Space Mountain: From the Earth to the Moon

From Defunctland’s YouTube description: The conclusion of Defunctland’s two episode dissection of the Euro Disney resort. This time, Kevin discusses the history of Discovery Mountain, aka Space Mountain: De La Terre a La Lune, aka Space Mountain: From the Earth to the Moon, and eventually known as Space Mountain: Mission 2.

Book Review: ‘Fall Guys: The Barnums of Bounce – The Annotated Version’ by Marcus Griffin, Annotated by Steve Yohe & Scott Teal

Fall Guys is a book that was written in the 1930s in an effort to expose the wrestling business. While it gets a lot of credit for pulling back the curtain, it wasn’t really the first piece written on the subject, as many magazine and news articles of the time had already delved into the behind the scenes stuff.

I think that this became somewhat legendary because it was released as a book and not as a series of articles in the paper or in a sports magazine.

If you’re going to read this and I feel like fans of wrestling history should, it would behoove you to pick up the annotated version by Steve Yohe and Scott Teal.

This was a great and solid read, as the new commentary on it served to correct some of the wrongs of the book and to clear up any misconceptions and faulty facts. Also, a lot of the examples and stories in the original book were fiction, used by the author to better illustrate his points.

The original piece of work is still an entertaining read and it does a superb job in painting the picture of what wrestling looked like in the 1930s, which in the wrestling world may feel like prehistoric times now. But it is certainly cool seeing what the business was generally like then in contrast to what it’s evolved into almost a century later.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: other historical wrestling books available by Crowbar Press.