Film Review: Spies Like Us (1985)

Release Date: December 6th, 1985
Directed by: John Landis
Written by: Dan Aykroyd, Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel, Dave Thomas
Music by: Elmer Bernstein, Paul McCartney (title song)
Cast: Chevy Chase, Dan Aykroyd, Steve Forrest, Donna Dixon, Bruce Davison, Bernie Casey, William Prince, Tom Hatten, Vanessa Angel, Frank Oz, Terry Gilliam, Ray Harryhausen, Joel Coen, Sam Raimi, Bob Hope, B.B. King, Larry Cohen

AAR Films, Warner Bros., 102 Minutes

Review:

“They do seem to be headed in that general direction. Maybe your dick’s not so dumb.” – Austin Millbarge, “It got me through high school.” – Emmett Fitz-Hume

When talking about the great comedy films of the ’80s, few ever mention Spies Like Us. While it stars two comedy legends in Chevy Chase and Dan Aykroyd, it’s sort of been lost in the shuffle with their other movies.

I had a friend’s dad who used to watch this movie constantly, when it first popped up on premium cable. While I loved it too, going over to my friend’s house almost always meant that we’d have to sit through this for the umpteenth time. I’m not sure why his dad was obsessed with this specific movie but because of that, I got burnt out on it and hadn’t watched it since, other than coming across some clips, here and there.

Watching it now, I am no longer plagued by the fatigue I once had for this film and I got to see it with somewhat fresh eyes.

Dan Aykroyd has always been a favorite of mine and honestly, I have had a new appreciation of Chevy Chase after revisiting and reviewing a lot of his movies lately. In this, he’s exceptionally good and it’s as if the movie was written specifically with him in mind.

Aykroyd is also on his A-game in this and the two men had good chemistry, which probably goes all the way back to their time on Saturday Night Live. And with that, I really wish these two would’ve worked together more often. I think all they did together after this was the abysmally bad and super weird Nothing But Trouble and Caddyshack II, where they were barely used and I’m not even sure if they shared any scenes in that one, at all.

Anyway, this sees the two legends paired together and sent into the Soviet Union as spies. What they don’t know going into their mission is that they are just sent in to create a distraction for the real spy team. However, they do end up rising to the occasion and help complete the real mission.

This was directed by John Landis, who had a real penchant for comedy, especially in the ’80s. He had directed Aykroyd a few times before this and he’d work with Chase after. But if you like Landis’ style of comedy, this fits right in with the rest of them.

Spies Like Us is just a fun, fairly mindless movie. Being that the Cold War was still seemingly going strong when this came out, it allowed people to laugh about it and also see Americans and Russians working together for a greater good.

Rating: 7/10

Film Review: Strange Brew (1983)

Also known as: The Adventures of Bob & Doug McKenzie: Strange Brew (complete title)
Release Date: August 19th, 1983 (Canada)
Directed by: Rick Moranis, Dave Thomas
Written by: Rick Moranis, Dave Thomas, Steve De Jarnatt
Based on: Bob and Doug McKenzie by Rick Moranis, Dave Thomas
Music by: Charles Fox
Cast: Rick Moranis, Dave Thomas, Paul Dooley, Max von Sydow, Lynne Griffin, Angus MacInnes, Mel Blanc (voice)

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 90 Minutes

Review:

“The power of the force has stopped you, you hosers.” – Doug McKenzie

I used to love the SCTV skits of Bob and Doug McKenzie when I’d see them replayed as a kid, primarily during the earliest days of Comedy Central. I had only seen this movie once, around early high school age but it’s eluded me ever since, despite its cult following.

So while I didn’t go into this fully blind, I had forgotten enough about the film’s plot and details to see it with fairly fresh eyes.

It’s still a funny picture and it really gives Bob and Doug more room to breathe and more time to pull off some elaborate and hilarious gags.

I’ve always liked the camaraderie between Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas and frankly, this is really the peak of their history together. However, I wish this had spawned sequels as it was titled in a way that seemed like they wanted to do more. And while there was almost a sequel in the late ’90s, we never really got to see these characters again.

Beyond the starring duo, this movie somehow landed legendary actor Max von Sydow, as its villain. I really enjoyed him in this, as he’s also pretty good at comedy and I got to see this iconic actor really ham it up with two of Canada’s finest comedians ever.

The plot is zany but ultimately it’s just about two drunk losers trying to save a brewery for a cute heiress whose uncle wants it for nefarious reasons.

Strange Brew is a strange, goofy and amusing picture starring two guys that everyone should love. I don’t consider it to be a classic on the level of some of the other films Moranis would work in but it’s still cool seeing his earliest work along with his and Dave Thomas’ writing and directing being on full display.

Rating: 6.5/10

Film Review: Stripes (1981)

Also known as: Cheech and Chong Join the Army (original script title)
Release Date: June 26th, 1981
Directed by: Ivan Reitman
Written by: Dan Goldberg, Harold Ramis, Len Blum
Music by: Elmer Bernstein
Cast: Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Warren Oates, P. J. Soles, Sean Young, John Candy, John Larroquette, John Diehl, Judge Reinhold, Joe Flaherty, Dave Thomas, Bill Paxton

Columbia Pictures, 106 Minutes, 122 Minutes (extended cut)

Review:

“Who’s your friend? Who’s your buddy? I am, aren’t I? You’re crazy about me, aren’t you?” – John Winger

This is considered one of the all-time great Bill Murray comedies. While I do like it, it was never really at the top of my list. I’m not quite sure why, as it also features Harold Ramis, John Candy, John Larriquette, Judge Reinhold, Joe Flaherty and Dave Thomas: all comedy legends I love.

Stripes is funny and amusing but from a narrative standpoint, it always felt kind of sloppy and pointless. Sure, these new recruit losers (mainly Murray and Ramis) do rise to the occasion and become heroes for a day, however, things in this movie just sort of happen without much purpose.

I get it, though, this is sort of just a goofy, mindless comedy. However, I guess I hold these guys and director Ivan Reitman to a higher standard because they’ve made much better films.

Without Bill Murray and someone as great as Ramis to play off of in nearly every scene, this would be reduced down to just a run of the mill screwball comedy like Meatballs or Porky’s.

I also know that Reitman probably didn’t have much of a budget to work with but this picture looks more like a television movie than a cinematic one. However, the film’s success did pave the way for the Ghostbusters movies, which are, to this day, my favorite comedy films of all-time.

Stripes is a movie that I still watch about twice a decade, as I can put it on and not think. But ultimately, it’s just never been as beloved by me as it seems to be by many others.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: other Bill Murray films of the ’80s, as well as comedy pictures directed by Ivan Reitman and John Landis.