Documentary Review: Way of the Puck (2006)

Release Date: April 29th, 2006 (WorldFest Houston)
Directed by: Eric D. Anderson
Written by: Eric D. Anderson
Music by: Brian Hawlk, Santiago Step

Creative Ape, 81 Minutes

Review:

Way of the Puck is one of many documentaries to come out in the last decade or so that follows a very small segment of the nerd world. Like The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters or Special When Lit, this movie showcases a group of elite players in a competitive niche hobby. The focus of this documentary is air hockey.

The movie does a good job at following around the different characters and showing their personalities. It also paints an interesting picture of competitive air hockey. It even makes a decent argument about how air hockey should be considered a sport by those outside of its tiny inner circle.

The problem, with the film, like air hockey, is in the end, it just isn’t that interesting. Where the films mentioned earlier were about retro arcade games and pinball, it worked for those films because video games and pinball are more interesting subject matter than air hockey. Yes, air hockey is fun to a degree but there is a reason why, since the late ’70s, air hockey tables tend to remain vacant while dozens swarm around video game cabinets and pinball machines.

I can appreciate the love and passion of these die hard fans in this film but it isn’t enough to enlighten me or most people. It is a little known hobby and it had its peak decades ago. That doesn’t mean that it can’t survive and thrive within the minuscule segment of society that loves it. But more likely than not, it is a hobby that will die with these guys. But that’s okay. It wouldn’t be the first hobby to fall victim to a fast moving world and its own growing obscurity.

Way of the Puck is a very human film that at least gives these guys a platform to talk to the world. Their message will most likely fall on deaf ears for the most part. But if air hockey makes them happy, then it really should be all they need. If you can find peace and happiness painting portraits on Pop-Tarts, good for you. But don’t expect other people to follow suit.

Rating: 6.75/10
Pairs well with: The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters and Special When Lit.

TV Review: Treme (2010-2013)

Original Run: April 11th, 2010 – December 29th, 2013
Created by: David Simon, Eric Overmyer
Directed by: various
Written by: various
Music by: various, theme by John Boutté
Cast: Khandi Alexander, Rob Brown, Chris Coy, Kim Dickens, India Ennenga, John Goodman, Michiel Huisman, Melissa Leo, Lucia Micarelli, David Morse, Clarke Peters, Wendell Pierce, Jon Seda, Steve Zahn, Kermit Ruffins

Blown Deadline Productions, Warner Bros., HBO, 36 Episodes, 60 Minutes (per episode)

Review:

For my 100th TV review on Talking Pulp (formerly Cinespiria), I wanted to dip into the well and pull out an old review for one of my favortie shows of all-time. Something that I felt was completely underappreciated and overlooked by most.

*Written in 2015.

I may need to re-order my countdown of HBO shows (from an older blog), as after re-watching Treme and in its entirety for the first time, I would rank it among the top five HBO shows of all-time.

Created by David Simon and Eric Overmyer, the great minds behind HBO’s critically acclaimed series The Wire, this show takes us to New Orleans months after Hurricane Katrina and shows us in intimate detail how the people of that ravaged city rebuilt their town, their homes, their businesses and their lives.

Starting out in a place of despair in a city full of corruption and ignored by the world outside, Treme triumphs in that it displays an unrelenting human spirit, focusing on the underlying morality of many of the characters and teaching the important lessons of appreciating what you have, holding on to what’s dear to you and to always strive for the right things in life. The characters in this show hit the hardest times of their lives but find ways to persevere and triumph. Treme in it’s three and a half seasons has more heart, soul and more morality than shows that have been on for years longer. It is a bright positive light in a medium overrun with negativity and darkness.

The ensemble cast is perfect. From Steve Zahn to Khandi Alexander to Kim Dickens to Wendell Pierce to John Goodman to Rob Brown to Melissa Leo to David Morse to Lucia Micarelli to the amazing Clarke Peters and multiple fantastic cameos by New Orleans jazz legend Kermit Ruffins, there isn’t a character that you don’t fall in love with. I know that I am missing some people but each character has such a dynamic story that truly evolves over the course of the three and a half seasons this show was on. Not a single character is boring or useless. None of them get lost in the shuffle. It is a well-balanced television series that maintained its focus and quality – doing every character and every plot thread justice.

The element that brings everything together so well is the emphasis on representing New Orleans culture in its full glory. The music, the art, the food, the language and the parties are all there. The sense of community and love for they neighbor is there. Everything that truly is New Orleans is embraced on this show and it is the most accurate portrayal I have ever seen of the city and its people, who are usually portrayed as backdrops to action flicks or voodoo horror movies.

Treme is one of those shows, now having seen it in its complete form, that I will probably re-watch almost annually. There aren’t a lot of episodes and it can be binge watched in a week or two. And if you love New Orleans, this show will always deliver that feeling you get when wandering Frenchman Street at night looking for amazing music, amazing food and a great experience.

Also, it is streaming on Amazon Prime. So if you have a Prime account, you can watch this show in its entirety.

Rating: 10/10
Pairs well with: The Wire and the Spike Lee HBO documentaries about New Orleans: When the Levees Broke – A Requiem In Four Acts and If God Is Willing and Da Creek Don’t Rise.

Talking Pulp: Red Dead Redemption: A Game Rife with Politics

*Written circa 2010 when I was running a blog about politics and economics.

*There be spoilers here!

Rockstar Game’s Red Dead Redemption may be one of the greatest games I have ever played. It has taken over the last several months of my life, well at least when I have had free time anyway, and it has, in my view, successfully painted a world reflecting the last days of the Old West.

Being a fan of the western genre, I have found Red Dead Redemption to be the greatest representation of that genre ever created for a video game. Like the Grand Theft Auto series, from the same developer, Red Dead Redemption is a game that is seemingly endless, even after beating the single player story mode. There are so may other quests to do and just roaming the countryside and having the freedom to do whatever you wish provides the player with infinite possibilities and hours upon hours of just being sucked into the Red Dead world. The plot is multilayered with several wrenches thrown into its already twisting machinations. However, underneath it all, there seems to be a political philosophy. Now, I am not saying that the Rockstar staff put this philosophy there intentionally but nonetheless it is there. I really just think that the philosophy is a reflection of the times and the life of the characters within the world of the game. The fact that a multilayered philosophy even exists in this game is a testament to the skills of the game’s developers.

To start, the main character, John Marston, was an ex-scumbag who used to run with a gang that murdered and stole. At the start of the game he has already fallen in love, got married and had a son named Jack. Marston, for the sake of his family and his soul, has renounced who he once was and is trying to stay on the right path. That is, until big government BOI (today’s FBI) agent Edgar Ross takes Marston’s family away from him. The only way Marston can get his family back is by working for Ross. Essentially, Ross wants Marston to hunt down and kill all the members of his old gang. However, Ross isn’t the most ethical of agents and there are several twists, turns and surprises that await John Marston on his journey. With that said, the game is about a man’s struggle to work within a corrupt system and to persevere, all while doing it just to achieve his dream: to live on a farm, with his family in peace and quiet with no one (including the government) to bother them. Isn’t that what we all want really? Well, maybe not the farm part.

John Marston’s desire to work hard and never quit, even within the nefarious system, in an effort to achieve his goals and save his family, is heroic. His desires and his actions and his personal philosophy throughout the game are almost libertarian. Hell, one could even make a solid argument that his spirit and personal philosophy was a precursor to Objectivism. He strongly opposed the corrupt big government policies and intrusion into people’s lives, in the U.S. and also in Mexico. In fact, on both sides of the border, he worked within the evil machine only to liberate himself from it and to fight against it. In the end, his fight for freedom and his family cost him his life. Although, he did save his wife and son and he died fighting, opposing corruption, betrayal and tyranny with his last breath.

In the spirit of libertarianism, Red Dead Redemption teaches the player about owning up to your actions and how to be personally responsible for them all while attempting to redeem yourself for the negative aspects of your character. Well, as John Marston anyway.

It also shows the horrors of a government that is too large and how that large government is infringing upon the rights of its people. Many of the more patriotic characters within Red Dead Redemption are incredibly vocal about this. In a lot of ways, unintentionally or not, some of the characters in the Red Dead world could fit well within the Tea Parties of today.

Taking place in 1910, the United States itself was at a major turning point. The industrial revolution was well underway and capitalism was at its peak. The world had also already come to recognize American Exceptionalism. Capitalism in its best forms and worst forms was very much on display in Red Dead Redemption and really left a lot to be analyzed by both sides of the coin: those who are pro-capitalist and those who are anti-capitalist.

However, I’m not going to go on a rant here about the differences between true capitalism and crony capitalism and how government’s involvement in that system is severely destructive and counterproductive to the whole thing. What I will say is that you ought to play the game and witness how capitalism, industrialization and American Exceptionalism killed the Old West and brought us into the future and out of the dark ages.

Another political aspect in the game, probably also unintentional but a part of the game nonetheless due to its awesome representation of life in 1910, is women’s rights. Yes, there are prostitutes all over the place but Marston refuses their advances, out of respect for his wife, and he treats them all with respect.

The other women in the game are all just as tough as the men and they do not back down and run from fear, danger or the corrupt and evil forces that they are faced with. In fact, they stand strong, run their businesses despite a tyrannical government with their hand in it and are just as helpful to John Marston as all the lawmen and combat experienced gents in the game. Essentially, the game paints women as equals to men, even though it takes place in a time when women were viewed as simple homemakers. I feel that the game more accurately portrays the women of the time, as opposed to the entertainment of that era, which was propaganda driven and helped hold women back in their “roles”.

Nowhere else is the spirit of freedom alive in the game then in the second act when our hero, John Marston, turns his back on the corrupt Mexican government, who he was briefly working for, and uses all of what he has learned about them to help the rebels build their long overdue offensive.

Storming the giant villa in Escalera is chilling. Although the rebels are pushing for social reform and their efforts may seem similar to Castro and Che in Cuba, it still gives you a rush, knowing that you are bombarding a well-armed and well-manned fortress to overcome tyranny and establish freedom for people who want nothing other than to tear down a corrupt regime. This is one of the greatest battles in the game and once tyranny in Mexico is seemingly destroyed or at least severely compromised, Marston returns to America to fight for his individual freedom against another corrupt regime.

I can’t honestly say that the game sits on one side of the political fence or the other. It is just a great representation of life in 1910 and it really leaves a lot open for interpretation. I know where I stand with it and a lot of what is going on in this game is timeless. So much of it rings true with what is current now and it is a true testament of political struggle, which represents today just as much as it does yesterday. Red Dead Redemption is definitely one of the best-written games of all time and politically, it has enough guts and enough meat to keep the politificionados talking for a long time.

Documentary Review: Of Miracles and Men (2015)

Release Date: February 8th, 2015
Directed by: Jonathan Hock
Music by: Joel Beckerman, Phil Hernandez, Chris Maxwell, Robert Miller

ESPN Films, 103 Minutes

Review:

*Written in 2015.

This was one on the more recent 30 For 30 films put out by ESPN.

This documentary covered the Soviet Union’s national hockey team during their dominant heyday and showed the famous “Miracle” game from their perspective, which provided a pretty unique take on the event.

Of Miracles and Men starts off by showing us how the Soviets developed their hockey game and the unorthodox approach to coaching that its founder had.

Unable to study the renowned Canadians, who made the sport famous, the Soviets taught themselves how to play from the ground up with no point of reference. Their coach analyzed everything he could outside of hockey and thought of ways to incorporate these things into the Soviet training routine. He took methods from dancing, weightlifting and other places. All of this showed how the Soviets developed such a refined style that was all their own at the time.

The documentary goes on to show the growth of hockey in the U.S.S.R. and how the nation developed immense pride for their athletes and the sport. All of which eventually lead to them playing some exhibition games against Canada.

While looked at as underdogs and not taken seriously, the Soviet team crushed Canada. And then they kept crushing Canada. And then they crushed everyone else, including the United States.

Where here, in America, we are told of the legend of the “Miracle” game from a very pro-American stance. This documentary shows the tale in a much more realistic light and provides the back story in a way that is more fleshed out than any version I’ve ever heard.

In the end, the Soviets weren’t so bloodthirsty about us, as we were of them. In fact, when they lost, they were more upset that they lost and weren’t looking at it as a failed attempt to topple America. In fact, they had toppled us quite a bit before this game and have toppled us after. Truthfully, the Soviets owned America historically. And today, the Russians still regularly kick our ass, even though we have amazing teams year after year.

An example one of the Soviet players gave in the film, is that this is like a fan of Sophia Loren who gets to kiss her. Years later he is still talking about the kiss. However, if you ask Loren about it, she probably doesn’t even remember it.

If anything, this film opens the viewers eyes to the propaganda machine.

In its simplest form, the “Miracle” game was a game played between really young athletes who just wanted to play the game because it was what they enjoyed doing. Athletes who were probably too young or focused on the game, to fully understand what was going on between these two countries politically.

In comparison to other 30 For 30 documentaries, this one fits in the upper echelon in terms of quality. The editing, interviews and narrative were fantastic. I just wish ESPN did more 30 For 30 films on hockey. I think this is only like the third one out of 60 plus films.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: Red ArmyMiracle and The Nagano Tapes: Rewound, Replayed & Reviewed.

Talking Pulp: Is Bioshock Anti-Objectivist?

*Written circa 2010 when I was running a blog about politics and economics.

*There be spoilers here!

After finishing Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, I decided to pick up Bioshock by 2K Games. The second one in the series was being released and I wanted to play through the first one before delving into its sequel.

The first Bioshock was a highly regarded video game and there is hardly anyone I know of who wasn’t impressed with it. The main reason why I wanted to check it out however, is because a friend of mine said that it was an argument against Objectivism and the philosophy Rand expressed in her magnum opus, Atlas Shrugged. I had also read this and heard this from many other sources. So, as I am becoming receptive to Ayn Rand’s philosophy, I felt that I had to jump into Bioshock to see if this was true.

For those who have read Atlas Shrugged and played Bioshock, there is no doubt whatsoever that there is a deep connection between them. Looking at two of the main characters in the game, one can immediately conclude, by their names alone, that the game was at least heavily inspired by Rand’s epic novel.

One of the characters is named Atlas; heck, that’s the first half of the book title. Another character is named Andrew Ryan, which is a play on words of Ayn Rand’s name. Ayn can be found in Ryan while Rand can be found in Andrew: not to mention that the initials are the same.

There are many other connections as well. For instance, both stories are about a great industrialist who escapes the oppressive constraints of political, economic and religious authority because those powers were sucking the great minds and artists of the world dry like parched vampires. This industrialist left normal society and went into hiding where he created his own society for the greatest minds and artists of the world to work together. Thus, leaving the real world to its fate without its greatest problem solvers, intellectuals, inventors, industrialists, engineers and artists.

Where the stories differ is in the fact that Atlas Shrugged shows that restricting and looting the world’s greatest minds is catastrophic to the rest of the world and that the selfishness of the elite, should be left unchecked for the benefit of all. Bioshock shows what happens when the great minds go insane and become mesmerized by their obsessive lust for power. Both versions show the same philosophy, although evolved into two opposite extremes.

So is the negative extreme of this philosophy displayed in Bioshock a true counterargument to Objectivism? I don’t think so. While Bioshock is sort of the worst-case scenario of what could happen in Rand’s utopian society, it really just critiques Atlas Shrugged and not Objectivism, as a whole. Also, the people in Bioshock were pretty much experimenting on themselves carelessly, which is something that the great minds in Atlas Shrugged would’ve most likely never done.

In Bioshock, the great minds became moochers and looters of their own legacy and self-destructed. Their carelessness was really just a footnote to the story and those behind it were barely analyzed. I do not see John Galt, the real hero of Atlas Shrugged, falling so easily and so idiotically. The elite of Atlas Shrugged would not throw it all away on stupidity and the negative aspects of the human ego after sacrificing all in which they did to create their perfect world. The characters in Bioshock almost came across as people who were inspired by Atlas Shrugged but seemingly missed the point.

Bioshock really doesn’t delve too far into laissez-faire capitalism apart from the very short welcoming monologue by Andrew Ryan and a few subtle hints here or there where Ryan and Atlas are giving skeletal critiques of the outside world’s looting nature. There isn’t much to base a real counterargument off of, contrary to popular belief. Also, Atlas Shrugged, as massive as it is, barely scratches the surface of the full meaning and philosophy of Objectivism.

Atlas Shrugged is a fictional tale that is so grandiose and epic that the magnitude of its essence is translated into its almost godlike characters and extreme situations. Although these over the top characters and situations have a very human and believable element to them, the context is still fictional and worked into a story. Atlas Shrugged is not a complete representation of Objectivism and Bioshock is not a complete counterargument to Atlas Shrugged. Therefore, it is not a true critique against Objectivism.

I don’t find Bioshock to be anti-Objectivist, as many people try to assume that it is. I think a lot of people who are anti-Rand just try to make Bioshock into a viable counterargument against her philosophy. I don’t see it this way at all. If anything, I feel that the game makers were heavily inspired by her work and in the vain of making a horror themed first-person shooter, they had to make a very scary translation of Rand’s material. Bioshock also pulls a lot of its world from Orwell, not just Rand. With that being said, one should expect Bioshock to be dark and horrifying in nature. Bioshock is not a viable counterargument against Atlas Shrugged or Objectivism for that matter. If anything, it is a minimalist counterpart to it and a great game that stands on its own.

People can enjoy both, as they compliment each other quite nicely and are not truly philosophical enemies. If anything, the dark nature of Bioshock adds credit to Rand’s work and is a warning to those who succumb to a mooching and looting nature.

Documentary Review: Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin’ (2013)

Also known as: American Masters: Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin’
Release Date: November 5th, 2013
Directed by: Bob Smeaton
Music by: Jimi Hendrix, Eddie Kramer (mixer)
Cast: Jimi Hendrix (archive footage)

Eagle Rock Entertainment, WNET Channel 13 New York, PBS, 90 Minutes

Review:

*Written in 2014.

Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin’ was actually an episode of PBS’ long-running television series American Masters. Even though this is a single episode of a show that has been on for decades, it is itself a film. In fact, it is one of the best biographical documentaries of a musician that I have seen in recent memory.

Obviously the film goes through the life of one of America’s greatest musicians of all-time, some would argue the best. This film has some pretty candid interviews however. Some of the most important and intimate are the old interviews with his father and the more modern ones with his sister, as well as other rock & roll gods and top rock music journalists.

The film gives a lot of insight into the personal life of Jimi, more so than other documentaries that I’ve seen on him. It extensively goes into his time in England, which was some of the coolest stuff in this documentary. The archive footage and performances of Hendrix were pretty amazing and should, from a cultural standpoint, be deemed priceless.

This PBS produced film is definitely worth the 90 minute playtime. It is currently streaming on Netflix.

Rating: 8.25/10
Pairs well with: Other American Masters documentaries.

Talking Pulp: Comicsgate and the Sustainability of Crowd Funded Comics

*If you have been following what has been going on with Comicsgate over the last several months, you can probably skip over the long introduction and jump right into the second part of the article. The introduction is to get people who aren’t aware of Comicsgate up to speed on what has been happening.

Part I: An Introduction to Set the Stage:

I have always hated labels but I find my ideals and my fandom in line with the Comicsgate movement. I hate anything called “(insert name)-gate” because it’s been done to death and at this point, it is misused. Initially, it was used as a suffix to label anything that was a scandal. Comicsgate like Gamergate before it isn’t a scandal, it is a push back against a forced social cultural agenda brought on by liberal extremists that many refer to as SJWs (or social justice warriors).

I really don’t want to spend my time on this article talking about SJWs, as all the big wigs in the Comicsgate movement have that covered. But in a nutshell, they tend to latch on to something in pop culture and use it as a platform to force diversity on the masses. No one I talk to or support in Comicsgate has a problem with diversity. We love diversity, which can be found in many major comic book titles going back decades.

Hell, it’s rare to find an old school comic book fan that isn’t a huge fan of the Chris Claremont era of X-Men, where diversity was kind of the whole point. My favorite franchise of all-time was G.I. Joe and that certainly wasn’t short on diversity. As a kid two of my favorite characters were Stalker (a black man) and the Baroness (a woman). My absolute favorite was Shipwreck, whose real name is Hector Delgado, so he’s probably Hispanic.

What Comicsgate people have a problem with is the SJW’s tactics and how they use hate filled rhetoric and intimidation while preaching the opposite. The big thing that people supporting Comicsgate want is good storytelling and for the intellectual properties that they love and cherish to be respected. But if you disagree with SJWs, they tend to call you names like “racist”, “bigot”, “misogynist”, “homophobe”, “white supremacist”, “Nazi”, “alt-right”, “Trump supporter” and whatever other bullshit they can come up with to bully you and paint you as something you aren’t.

I’m none of those things, by the way, not that I should even have to defend myself. And I didn’t support Trump… or Hillary for that matter. I’m an anarcho-capitalist that hates talking about politics because I ran a blog about it for several years until my brain exploded. It then took several more years for my brain to regenerate into something other than pulpy goo.

Anyway, when you try to have rational or reasonable discussions, the SJWs call you more names and then block you on social media because that’s what modern day bullies do. In the old days, bullies at least had balls and would get in your face, physically. Nowadays, the bullies are setting up GoFundMe accounts to get their fans to pay for surgeries to remove their balls (see for yourself). I guess being a writer for Marvel and DC Comics with an SJW agenda isn’t a good paying gig when you need to crowdfund your sex change operation. Point being, comic book sales are terrible in 2018, as the industry is essentially being held hostage by these SJW types. Comic books, as we know them, are dying a horrible death. Seriously, look at Squirrel Girl… who buys this shit?

But with all that being said, there are several people who are now creating their own comics because they no longer want to work within an industry where they aren’t wanted by those who hold the keys to the kingdom. Many conservatives in comics have been harassed and blacklisted. Those who still work in the comics industry that don’t agree with SJW politics and tactics, keep their mouths shut for fear of losing their jobs or receiving even worse backlash.

However, guys like Richard C. Meyer a.k.a. Zack of Diversity & Comics (currently at 81K subscribers) and former DC Comics artist Ethan Van Sciver a.k.a. ComicArtistPro Secrets (currently at 68K subscribers) have spoken out heavily against the SJW types and have created their own projects, which are being crowd funded with great success, unlike SJWs trying to crowd fund the snipping of their genitalia.

Diversity & Comics was the first to come out with his own graphic novel, which is called Jawbreakers – Lost Souls. Right now, this book has raised $362K from 9403 backers, funding 3867% of its initial goal. Ethan Van Sciver followed with Cyberfrog: Bloodhoney, which has raised $436K from 6928 backers, funding 5452% of its initial goal. These campaigns are still open and will continue to raise money.

Now there are other creators entering the fray and that’s what I’m here to discuss after this long winded introduction to get my readers up to speed.

Part II: Moving Beyond the Genesis of Comicsgate:

I have supported Jawbreakers and Cyberfrog. I did it gladly, without even knowing much about the comics themselves, as it is about funding something bigger than just a comic book project. It is about funding a movement and trying to change the industry. As time rolls on and things change and modernize with technology, we don’t have to necessarily buy comic books the same way that we’ve been buying them since, well… half a century before I was even born. To be honest, I still love walking into my local comic shops and buying stuff off of the wall and I think every true comic fan agrees with me there.

Since supporting those two projects, I’ve also found myself backing Cautionary Comics’ Ravage – Kill All Men!, Mitch and Elizabeth Breitweiser’s Red Rooster: Golden Age (the one I’m most excited about) and Richard C. Meyer’s second project Iron Sights.

The thing is, there are more projects out there that I haven’t supported and many more in the pipeline. So that raises some questions worth exploring.

To start, these comic books are typically graphic novel size or longer than standard comics. Plus, they are printed independently without being under the banner of a large publisher like Marvel, DC, Image, Dark Horse, etc. Therefore, they can’t print these books as cheaply because they aren’t printing mass quantities, month after month, till the end of time.

Printing costs are determined by a combination of things: mainly cost of goods (paper, ink, etc.) and labor. More comics means that the cost of overall goods goes down and so does the amount of labor, as labor is mostly tied in to setting up the press. It doesn’t matter if you set up a press to print 100 comics or 100,000, the set up process is virtually the same. Spreading that cost out over 100 copies is going to cost more per issue than spreading it out over 100,000 copies.

So keeping that in mind, the cost of these crowd funded indie comics is more expensive than that issue of Detective Comics that you bought at your local store. What usually costs $3.99 to $4.99 costs at least $20. Keep in mind that there are more pages in these books but the price is still quite a bit more than the norm.

But realistically, most people will spend more than this. I’ve spent between $30 and $75 on each of these projects. Reason being, there are all types of perks based off of what tier you decide to purchase. So for instance, on Red Rooster I got the $50 tier, which comes to $60 after shipping but it includes a signed copy of the 48 page Red Rooster comic, a sketchbook of unused and conceptual art, as well as a sticker related to the project. I really wanted the sketchbook in addition to the comic, so I spent twice as much as I would have for just the comic alone, which was $25.

The point I’m trying to make here is that these things aren’t cheap. But that’s okay. I gladly funded these projects because I like them, the people behind them and what all of this represents. Tens of thousands of other people feel the same way and so far, these Comicsgate related projects have raised more than $950,000 in less than two months and that’s just the projects I have supported. I’m sure the ones I haven’t backed push the number over a million dollars. Plus, Red Rooster and Iron Sights just started a week or so ago.

Additionally, there is a lot of buzz around these books as most of the creators are helping each other out by promoting different projects than just their own. YouTube and Twitter have been the strongest forces in getting the word out. And since Jawbreakers and Cyberfrog both went gangbusters, everyone is excited and motivated even more than they were a few months ago. This is great for the creators and even better for the fans.

But can this momentum maintain? How big is the market share, really? It is easier to control a few projects and to pinpoint where the consumer should put their buck but what happens when others start jumping on the bandwagon, which is already happening?

Part III: The Uncertain Future:

The thing is, as more projects hit the market, there will be more choices. That is how capitalism works.

However, more doesn’t necessarily mean better and while the creators now seem like a good, solid group of people in this for the right reasons and to help establish something larger for the comic book industry, there are no guarantees in the type of people that could come along next.

I’m not saying that we should be weary? Quite the contrary. I’m all about accepting people with open arms. If they turn out to be a douche, I cross my arms and move on. But everyone should be given the same platform and means to achieve success. I think people should be smart with their money though and not just freely throw it onto every project that pops up. I’ve had to do that with some projects that I was going to help fund simply because of my excitement level for what’s been happening. I’d love to fund all of these things but I only make so much money and have bills to pay; that’s life. Plus, there’s other things outside of the Comicsgate sphere that I want to back just because they’re projects that resonate with me in some way.

Anyway, once the floodgates are open and they’re nearly there, it will be hard for others to have the same sort of early success that Richard C. Meyer and Ethan Van Sciver had with their first projects. Truthfully, their follow up comics might not perform as well either when other projects pop up on Indiegogo or Kickstarter. I hope that the word spreads and that sales continue to increase but we don’t yet know how big this market can be.

Right now, the market is only so big. It is growing, however. I definitely feel like it still has room to expand but that also comes from maintaining the level of enthusiasm people have for all of this.

I found out about all of this Comicsgate stuff through a friend that introduced me to Diversity & Comics six months or so ago. I also started following Ethan Van Sciver after that because I liked a lot of the things he was saying, even if his channel is mostly about Star Wars and I’ve pretty much moved on from that franchise.

I think that it is important for people to share what is happening on social media because in this day and age, it is the best way to get the word out. And people are doing just that, which is why the movement has drastically expanded in the last few months and why Cyberfrog and Jawbreakers are crushing it on Indiegogo.

Wearing your passion on your sleeve is the best thing you can do. And being outspoken against the haters and the bullshit is also important because anyone who supports these guys is public enemy number one to the majority of comic book pros in the mainstream comics industry.

With more people coming into this from the creative side, the pie will have to be cut up into smaller pieces. That’s fine though, because in a free market, the better comics will survive and outshine the ones that just aren’t up to snuff. That’s how it works and I think that most people on the Comicsgate side of the coin understand this. But if the market continues to increase, that’s just more money to go around.

Unfortunately, there are some lesser known creators that are getting all worked up and accusing the more popular guys of stealing their thunder and cutting into their pieces of the pie. The truth is, this shit isn’t going to help them sell more books and no one will really have sympathy for this sort of whiny bullshit. Everyone that’s creating on the side of Comicsgate is working towards making the industry better overall but ultimately, are also working to make their bank accounts larger because that’s what business is.

These people that feel entitled to something just because they have been doing it longer won’t matter in the grand scheme of things and this sort of infighting within the network doesn’t help anyone. Get motivated by your competition and use that as fuel to make a better product; see what works for the successful creators and learn from those successes.

Plus, the success of the bigger guys like Ethan Van Sciver and Ricahrd C. Meyer is what brought more people to the movement. I probably wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for these two guys. The truth is that they’ve baked a much larger pie for people to get in on. Their presence in this network of like minded people should be seen as something positive, as it does benefit everyone.

Part IV: What the Future Can Be:

I have heard a lot of people make the same connection that I am about to but this Comicsgate movement is very similar to the Image Revolution in the early ’90s. The last time I felt this way about comics was when I was in middle school and seven major comic book creators walked out on their jobs at Marvel to start their own independent company. Their reasons and motivation were different but what they were looking for was essentially the same: a better comic book industry where the creators own their creations and get to make as much money as they possibly can by plying their trade. And in the case of Comicsgate, creating better stories and respecting the established history of the industry.

The biggest difference between this generation’s rebels and the founders of Image, is that these modern rebels interact directly with their customers. They are approachable, easy to communicate with and have the ability to adapt to trends on the fly. This isn’t just about crowd funding money, it is about crowd funding ideas and criticism. It’s also about building the movement. If my middle school aged self could have had conversations with Todd McFarlane, Rob Liefeld or Jim Lee, I would’ve lost my damn mind. We live in a really cool time.

The SJW creators don’t want to interact with their fans, they want to dictate what their fans should support and call them “toxic” if they don’t follow suit. The SJW way of doing business will absolutely fail and the Comicsgate creators are on the right side of the consumer.

As this continues to grow, the future will start taking shape for the comic book industry in new ways. I don’t think Marvel or DC will ever go out of business, as they own very profitable characters that are essentially the gods and heroes of American mythology. But guys like Ethan and Richard will probably have to start their own companies. Or there will end up being some sort of indie publishing house that will form to take on the duties of printing and distributing these products with more regularity and eventually, at a cheaper price.

This could very well lead to a third major company forming and making the same sort of impact that Image did with their first string of releases in 1992. In fact, this could be bigger, as a large part of the Comicsgate fan base is comprised of people that have been long time fans and are no longer kids buying comics with their allowance. We have jobs, make real world money and are a much bigger financial pot to dip into than Image had with their earliest fans. I understand that the comics industry doesn’t do early ’90s numbers in 2018 but that can change. Maybe this is what the industry needs and the x-factor that can propel it forward for future generations. Especially, when just two guys have independently crowd funded over $800,000 for just two comics in less than two months.

Part V: Conclusion:

There is a lot to be excited about and things have changed for the better with the impact that Comicsgate has made on the industry in just a short time. The SJW creators try to ignore it and downplay it but they’re terrified, which is why they spend all their time trying to undermine it, harass its supporters and attempt to sabotage it at every turn. Just look into what Mark Waid did to Antarctic Press in trying to stop Richard C. Meyer’s Jawbreakers from being published (video on that here).

It is still an uphill battle and a few big victories don’t necessarily win a war. It’s up to the fans and the creators to keep pushing forward in positive ways and to not become swayed by hate filled shitbirds that are just projecting that hate onto normal, well adjusted people. Plus, SJWs have proven time and time again that they’re not very smart and that they’re just cowards that will talk shit and then immediately block you. Ding Dong Ditch was a game for pussies.

It is important to support these projects if you believe in what all of this stands for and if you want to create a comic book industry that is once again thriving and healthy without lame ass identity politics, crappy writing and shitty Tumblr art.

As the train keeps running, spend that money wisely. Buy what you want though. So many new projects are about to flood the market and that’s a good thing because you now have more choices. It’s okay to be selective because these comics are pricier and with that, you deserve to get more for your investment. The cream will rise to the top and with that, bigger and better things for the creators that succeed and the fans that have supported them.

Maybe one day there will be a Jawbreakers or a Cyberfrog movie. Why not both? Why not more?

*The highest rated definitions of “Comics Gate” and “SJW” on Urban Dictionary.