Comic Review: 1985

Published: July 22nd, 2009
Written by: Mark Millar
Art by: Tommy Lee Edwards

Marvel Comics, 146 Pages

Review:

This comic book was cool as hell!

It sort of reads like it’s a season of Stranger Things but where the small town is haunted by Marvel villains instead of weird shit from the Upsidedown. This also came out in the decade before Stranger Things, so it was kind of ahead of the curve but like Stranger Things, knew how to tap into ’80s nostalgia in a brilliant way.

But this was also written by Mark Millar, a true master of his craft.

What’s unique and cool about this comic is that it doesn’t take place in the Marvel Universe, it takes place in our universe.

The story follows a young boy in 1985. He is having issues like any normal ’80s kid dealing with divorced parents. He bonds with his father pretty strongly though, as they both have a deep love of comic books and are experts on Marvel lore. At the same time, Marvel villains start showing up in the real world because there are no heroes here to stop them.

Overall, this was a really neat idea and for the most part, I thought it was superbly executed.

1985 is incredibly imaginative but it really worked so well because the art fit the concept and the tone. While Millar deserves credit for a great story, Tommy Lee Edwards gave it so much more life than just words on paper. And his style works better for the setting than having that sort of standard Marvel art style.

This is one of those comics that I’m happy to have discovered as an adult but wish would have been around when I was a kid. If you know a kid that loves Marvel but they’ve never read this, I think that they’ll probably love the hell out of it.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: the Stranger Things comics, as well as other Mark Millar stories.

Comic Review: Killmonger

Published: December 5th, 2018 – March 6th, 2019
Written by: Bryan Hill
Art by: Juan E. Ferreyra

Marvel Comics, 117 Pages

Review:

I didn’t pick this series up until it was a few issues in. A friend of mine told me to check it out and said it was my cup of tea.

It was pretty damn entertaining and it felt more in line with the current runs of The Punisher and Daredevil than an actual Black Panther comic. Also, this is an origin story of Erik Killmonger’s earlier life in the New York underworld.

We see him form a cool squad with a chess piece theme. They initially work for the Kingpin but have a falling out pretty early, which pits Killmonger against Bullseye at the midpoint of this five-part miniseries’ arc.

This is mostly just focused on the criminal underworld and gritty action, as opposed to being a fantastical superhero sci-fi story. But it does a fantastic job of fleshing out the comic book incarnation of Erik Killmonger while also taking some cues from the Marvel Cinematic Universe version of the character that was played by Michael B. Jordan in the Black Panther movie.

The story is action packed and just cool. It almost feels like an old school ’70s or ’80s action film with a grindhouse vibe to it. My only real complaint about the series is that the final issue felt weak comapred to everything leading up to it and for the most part, the story played out a bit too predictably.

Regardless of that, this does build the character up in a great way and it makes me hope that Bryan Hill will get to do something more with the character in the future. Hell, I wouldn’t mind seeing an ongoing series continue on from this miniseries.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: current runs on The Punisher and Daredevil. It doesn’t pair well with the current run of Black Panther, which is more of an intergalactic space opera.

Comic Review: Marvel Knights 20th

Published: November 7th, 2018 – January 30th, 2019
Written by: Donny Cates, Tini Howard, Vita Ayala, Matt Rosenberg
Art by: various

Marvel Comics, 161 Pages

Review:

When the Marvel Knights line of comics were going strong, I wasn’t paying much attention. I was aware of them but it was the late ’90s and I wasn’t reading comic books as regularly, as I was entering my twenties and didn’t do much other than party hard and sleep little.

I have since gone back and read some of the stories from that alternate Marvel universe and I’ve liked a lot of them. So when I saw that this was coming out to commemorate the 20th anniversary, I had to check it out. Plus, one of the writers is Donny Cates, whose recent work I’ve loved and it heavily features Daredevil.

The premise was kind of cool and I did enjoy this overall. Although, it was problematic in regards to its pacing. This is due to there being too many writers chiming in over the six issues. Cates looked to be credited as the top writer for each chapter but he had different collaborators with each new installment of this miniseries.

The narrative flow was a bit off, as it took too long to get the action going. Once we get to where this needed to wrap up, it felt rushed and the twist finale seemed strange, out of place and too convenient.

There’s a MacGuffin device and all they have to do in the end is hit a button and fix everything. I love Cates but that’s just lazy, outdated 1960s comic book writing. It’s like a random wizard showing up at the end and casting a “fix it” spell, making everything that happened pretty pointless.

I was still glad that I read through this miniseries, as it featured a lot of characters I love. I can’t call it underwhelming but I did have expectations that I don’t feel were met.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: old school Marvel Knights stuff and other recent works by Donny Cates.

Comic Review: Infinity Wars

Published: August 1st, 2018 – December 19th, 2018
Written by: Gerry Duggan
Art by: Mike Deodato Jr.

Marvel Comics, 212 Pages

Review:

Not all Marvel mega events are created equal. In fact, the last several years have seen many come and go that were pretty forgettable. While this doesn’t do much to right the ship, it at least had some interesting ideas, was pretty ambitious and had some top notch art by Mike Deodato Jr.

If I’m being honest, I was really pleased with the first two issues of this six issue story arc. It started out with a bang but once we got mashed up heroes and Infinity Gems switching hands quicker than a potato in a game of Hot Potato, my head started spinning so fast that it nearly exploded.

Plus, apart from Sleepwalker, the tie-ins to this were terrible.

I guess someone thought that mashing up Marvel heroes was a cool idea but man, it felt gimmicky as hell and none of these new creations really worked. Well, except for the Ant-Man sized Hulk. That was actually kind of cool.

Anyway, Gamora of the Guardians of the Galaxy is the villain in this. It seems completely uncharacteristic of her and the only reasoning for her turn to the dark side seems to be the fact that she is a daughter of Thanos. Daddy issues aside, it doesn’t work for me even though I did like her new, evil look.

It should be obvious to anyone that this mega event was created in a cheap attempt to capitalize off of the release of the Infinity War movie but I doubt that really helped sales of this mediocre book.

The first issue sold out at my local comic shop but issues two through six are just sitting on the shelves still, along with all the tie-in crap.

But at least I got a Sleepwalker comic again, even if it was just four issues and sadly tied to this event.

Rating: 5.25/10
Pairs well with: other Marvel mega events that fell way below the hype.

Comic Review: The Death of Daredevil

Published: October 17th, 2018 – November 28th, 2018
Written by: Charles Soule
Art by: Phil Noto

Marvel Comics, 112 Pages

Review:

This story takes place over Daredevil issues 609 through 612 and marks the end of Charles Soule’s run. And while I’m anticipating new blood taking over the writing duties for this series, I have mostly enjoyed Soule’s work.

So it’s hard to talk about this story without spoiling it. So if you want to go into it blind, why are you reading a review for it anyway? Just scroll down now and see the rating.

The title of this alludes to Daredevil meeting his demise. However, there is a twist to that, which I have to admit, I didn’t see coming even though their were some obvious pieces laid out in this arc and the one before it.

Wilson Fisk a.k.a. the Kingpin is still mayor of New York, Daredevil, as a hero and a lawyer, has tried to push back and expose Fisk for the criminal that everyone, even those who voted for him, already know he is.

That being said, this story is the end of an era for both Daredevil and Kingpin. I won’t say what happened but the seeds have been planted for great change going forward on all fronts.

This also had brief cameos from some of the key Avengers in a court room scene, as well as a run in with Bullseye and some other well-known villains along the way. We also get the debut of a new villain named Vigil, who looks cool as hell but as this story unfolds, leaves me wondering if he’d even show up again.

The story was pretty good but I’m just not a fan of the art style. I know it’s appealing to some but it just lacks energy. I hope Daredevil gets back to a grittier and almost pulpy neo-noir feel once the new team takes over.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: the other Charles Soule story arcs on Daredevil that lead up to this finale.

Comic Review: Bullseye: The Colombian Connection

Published: August 30th, 2017
Written by: Ed Brisson
Art by: Guillermo Sanna, Dave Johnson (cover)

Marvel Comics, 128 Pages

Review:

I’ve only been familiar with Ed Brisson’s writing on Old Man Logan. But that series is one of my favorite current comics on the market. Recently, he had two stories featuring Bullseye, which were continuations of things that happened in this tale: The Colombian Connection. Seeing that this was also written by Brisson, I wanted to check it out to get more context and backstory to Bulleye’s appearances in Old Man Logan.

For the most part, this is a badass action thriller where the main character is an evil bastard murdering other evil bastards while evading an FBI agent that’s out for his blood and her own personal revenge.

I like Brisson’s writing style and his penchant for grittiness, which is why I love his run on Old Man Logan so much. In a lot of ways, this reminds me of Cormac McCarthy’s novels or Taylor Sheridan’s film writing.

Being a long-time fan of Bullseye, it was cool seeing him get his own miniseries. I’ve always felt like he’s been underrated and overshadowed unless you specifically read Daredevil. Sure, he’s crossed over and fought other heroes and villains before but he seems to never really get the respect he deserves in the larger Marvel universe. And frankly, he was a joke in the 2003 Daredevil movie. But maybe I just prefer seeing him in his badass outfit as opposed to looking like an Irish punk rocker.

If you’ve always felt like you’ve had the need for a Bullseye-centric story, this should make you happy. It’s not a classic, per se, but it’s a hell of a fun ride with a psychotic assassin for hire that always seems ten steps ahead of his targets, even if he is regularly tied to a chair.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: the Old Man Logan story arcs that serve as sequels to this story.

Comic Review: Old Man Logan: Bullseye Returns

Published: July 11th, 2018 – August 8th, 2018
Written by: Ed Brisson
Art by: Juan E. Ferreyra, Mike Deodato Jr.

Marvel Comics, 67 Pages

Review:

This three issue story arc was a pick up of events from a previous three issue story arc: Moving Target. This one takes places in issues 43 through 45.

The story is pretty simple, Bullseye returns for a bit of revenge after the events of that previous tale and he and Wolverine, er… Old Man Logan… are once again pitted against each other.

This series of issues does not disappoint and we get some serious f’n fisticuffs between these two masters of physical combat.

Wolverine and Bullseye haven’t crossed paths very often in their long histories but when they do, it’s a sight to behold for any fanboy of either character or just comic books featuring badass manly men who don’t shy away from brutality and going the distance to the absolute bitter end.

Like previous Old Man Logan story arcs, I am a fan of the art, the tone and the writing style of Ed Brisson: at least as far as this character is concerned. It’s obvious that he is working towards an end to this series; I would assume that will happen with issue 50 and because the “real” Wolverine is coming back into continuity. But Brisson has given this much beloved version of Logan a great journey and a fantastic series of testosterone bursting encounters.

I love this series and this chapter is just one of a few cherries on top of this bloody sundae.

This also feels like a real throwback to those late ’80s/early ’90s solo Wolverine tales. And with the inclusion of Bullseye, once again, this is a ’90s kid’s dream.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: Other Old Man Logan stories but this ties directly to Moving Target (issue 36 through 38).