Comic Review: The Witcher, Vol. 1: House of Glass

Published: October 7th, 2014
Written by: Paul Tobin
Art by: Joe Querio, Mike Mignola (cover)
Based on: The Witcher novels by Andrzej Sapkowski

Dark Horse Comics, 137 Pages

Review:

I wasn’t sure what to expect from a Witcher comic book but I’m glad that this didn’t disappoint and was a pretty cool read.

While the cover was done by Mike Mignola, the interior art was not. However, it does have the same sort of vibes even if it is less stylized.

The story here was enjoyable and there’s a mystery to be solved. While things aren’t what they seem, the story isn’t predictable and the ending is pretty satisfactory.

Most of the story takes place in and around a haunted house but there are a few characters that come into this tale, as well as some neat monsters, many of which you’ll recognize from The Witcher games.

The story here was interesting and well written with fairly rich and well developed characters that you end up caring about.

All in all, if you are a fan of the franchise, this is definitely worth your time.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: other Witcher comics.

Book Review: ‘Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet’ by Julian Assange, Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Muller-Maguhn & Jérémie Zimmermann

Overall, this was a pretty engaging book but it also wasn’t what I had hoped it would be, which is more of an autobiographical piece by Julian Assange, his work and his philosophy behind it all.

Instead, this reads like a conversation between four people who are talking about the cypherpunk movement.

It covers a lot of the stuff I had hoped it would but there’s that part of me that wanted something more personal and much deeper from Assange.

For those that care about this stuff, this is still most definitely a worthwhile read. Although, there probably isn’t a lot here that’s new knowledge.

However, for those who are just learning about this stuff and who didn’t live through the history of the WikiLeaks saga in real time, you’ll probably be shocked by a lot of the things that are covered here.

Regardless of your level of knowledge, though, this is definitely worth the shelf space in your library if you have an interest in tech history, freedom, conspiracies, coverups and wanting the truth to always come out.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other books about cypherpunk culture, hacking and cryptocurrency.

Comic Review: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero – Classics, Vol. 12

Published: July 20th, 2011
Written by: Larry Hama
Art by: John Stateman, Herb Trimpe, Rod Whigham, Andrew Wildeman
Based on: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero by Hasbro

Marvel Comics (original printing), IDW Publishing (reprinted), 280 Pages

Review:

The last volume was probably where I would have jumped off the series when I was a kid, if I hadn’t jumped off of it before that due to getting older and getting strange feelings around girls.

Sadly, this collection of issues didn’t pick things back up and it just continued down a crappy path.

At this point, it’s like all the good stories have been told and the series just feels like it is running aimlessly on fumes without a clear direction. Maybe Larry Hama stopped caring and Hasbro was just making him wedge in all their new, weird toys, which, in my opinion, wrecked the franchise and killed it due to terrible redesigns and stupid, unrealistic vehicles.

With this stretch of issues, the art quality also fell off fairly significantly. While this features multiple artists, the overall quality is poor and littered with issues from bad perspective to weird faces and bizarre anatomy.

This is also longer than the previous eleven volumes by a couple of issues, which made pushing through it even harder.

But at least there were a lot of ninjas!… even if most of the new ones look really stupid.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: Any of the original Marvel G.I. Joe and Transformers comics.

Book Review: ‘Kings of the Wyld’ by Nicholas Eames

I heard some good things about this book from different sources. It got me hyped up and I was really stoked to give it a read.

Initially, it lived up to expectations, as the first fifty or so pages were great. It was well written, I liked the two main characters and it hit you in the feels from the get go.

However, once they set off on their adventure, the book became tedious and tiresome.

A lot of times, the action happened off the page and was just sort of reflected on, as characters spent most of their time exchanging witticisms. Because of this, I felt like the author was leaning on the strength of his dialogue and working around his possible weaknesses.

However, after hundreds of pages of mostly banter, I couldn’t wait to get through this book.

Sure, there is action but the stuff I wanted out of this book took a backseat too often. By the time you get where you’re supposed to be going, you don’t care anymore.

This was about 500 pages. It could’ve bumped up the action and told a good, solid story in 300 pages.

I had hoped that this would be the start of a series I could’ve loved but in the end, I’ll pass on its sequels.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: I’m assuming it’s sequel and other installments in the future, as well as other modern fantasy novels.

Comic Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 11: Attack On Technodrome

Published: July 1st, 2015
Written by: Kevin Eastman, Tom Waltz
Art by: Cory Smith
Based on: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Kevin Eastman, Peter Laird

IDW Publishing, 104 Pages

Review:

This isn’t really a filler volume in the long-running Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series by IDW, as much as it is its own solid story that puts a heavy emphasis on developing a much bigger event that is going to go down and take up the two volumes after this one. The second such event in this version of TMNT continuity. When I get to those, I’ll probably review them together, as I did the last massive story arc.

In this, however, we see Donatello go behind his brothers’ backs and try to work out an alliance with Shredder, so that they can all take down Krang, his army and the dreaded Technodrome.

There are a lot of swerves and plot twists but the story reads really well and was pretty satisfying. While this wasn’t my favorite volume, it doesn’t disappoint and it kept the story moving forward at a brisk pace without it becoming redundant or derivative of previous stories, which is really hard to do when a series has gone on as long as this one has.

Cory Smith has taken over the art full-time and I like his work. It’s a bit more dynamic and detailed and it feels like the quality is a step up from what it has been. And that’s not to knock the previous artists, as I’ve really liked this series from both the art and writing sides of the coin.

In the end, I’m still enjoying this series and frankly, it’s now probably my favorite version of the turtles. I’m really looking forward to the big arc that follows this one.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: the rest of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles run.

Book Review: ‘The Cthulhu Stories of Robert E. Howard’

I’ve always loved that H.P. Lovecraft never really gave a shit that other writers would tap into his Cthulhu mythos. In the case of Robert E. Howard, the two had become good friends whose work influenced each other. So, naturally Howard wrote some Lovecraftian tales and even merged some of his most famous characters with those existing in Lovecraft’s literary universe.

The first story in this anthology collection sees Howard’s Kull of Atlantis crossover into Lovecraftian horror. Granted, this also happened in some works featuring Conan the Cimmerian, as well.

My favorite story in the collection was the second one, which was originally a novella. The story is called “Skull-Face”. The story is about a British man who smokes opium, has weird visions and then discovers that there’s something real and sinister afoot.

As I was reading “Skull-Face”, I kept envisioning Peter Cushing as the main character and it read like something that could’ve been adapted greatly by Hammer Films in the 1960s.

The rest of the stories were also pretty solid but my mind kept drifting back to “Skull-Face”.

All in all, this was really neat to read as it merged two of my favorite fantasy authors’ worlds together. Sure, Lovecraft influenced Howard’s sword and sorcery tales but this thick volume went beyond just the stuff I’ve read involving Conan, Kull and Solomon Kane.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other works by Robert E. Howard, as well as the literary work of H.P. Lovecraft.

Comic Review: Do As You’re Told: The Ballad of NO

Published: October, 2020
Written by: Richard C. Meyer
Art by: Kelsey Shannon

Splatto Comics, 24 Pages

Review:

Overall, this was my least favorite comic that Richard C. Meyer has done. It ties to his recent PANdemIC comic and both of them tie-in to a larger release, soon to come.

I did enjoy PANdemIC but if I’m being honest, this one felt kind of rushed.

I felt that the story just wasn’t there and each situation was pretty predictable despite each development being shocking to those within the story.

I think that it might have read better if Meyer hadn’t spilled the beans about the character and his actions while describing the comic on multiple videos he put out. But the twist is really the only plot that there is, despite this happening in current year where city streets have been overtaken by riots, looting and general unrest.

Kelsey Shannon is a damn solid artist but I felt like his work was rushed here, too. I get it though, they wanted to get this out there and in people’s hands while these things were still topical and because there is a bigger crossover thing happening but I was pretty underwhelmed by it visually, as well.

I certainly don’t have buyer’s remorse or anything and I’m looking forward to seeing what the bigger plan is with this new group of titles Meyer is working on.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: other comics by Richard C. Meyer, specifically those that will be tied to this story.

Comic Review: Cyberfrog: Unfrogettable Tales, Vol. 1 & 2

Published: October, 2020
Written by: Ethan Van Sciver
Art by: Ethan Van Sciver, Kyle Ritter

All Caps Comics, 64 Pages

Review:

Being that this was old school O.G. Cyberfrog, I wasn’t sure what to expect. However, I’m really happy to say that this was a fucking blast!

Ethan Van Sciver, Cyberfrog creator, has sort of downplayed his old shit and I think that this was mainly to lower expectations, as he might not have thought his original stuff was up to snuff, but it was a damn fun comic with stupendous art, which came to vibrant and spirited life with the great color work of Kyle Ritter.

Being that this was made in the early ’90s and takes place before the modern revival of the Cyberfrog character, makes it very different, tonally. In a lot of ways, though, if you enjoy the Cyberfrog mythos, this is a must read because it really lets you get to see the character in happier times doing what he does best and that’s merking punkass pieces of shit and cracking jokes at their expense.

I like EVS’ humor and with that extra bit of ’90s edgy boi panache, it really comes through and made me smile multiple times throughout these two fantastic issues.

Additionally, even though this was reworked and recolored for new fans, it’s damn cool to see Van Sciver’s earliest work. I’m a fan of the guy and for me that goes back to his work on Green Lantern, which brought me back to comics after nearly a decade of not giving a shit about them.

If you missed this campaign when it was crowdfunding on Indiegogo, you should still try your damnedest to track down a copy of both issues.

In the end, this keeps my enthusiasm for the man’s future work strong and I can’t wait to read what’s next.

Rating: 8.5/10
Pairs well with: other Cyberfrog releases.

Book Review: ‘Flame and Crimson: A History of Sword-and-Sorcery’ by Brian Murphy

As a lifelong, hardcore fan of sword and sorcery fiction, this was a thoroughly enjoyable read.

Brian Murphy did his research and it showed, as this great book is probably the best thing I’ve ever read on the history of sword and sorcery fantasy, as a whole.

It’s part biographical when it covers specific writers in the genre but it also gets really deep into the history of the sword and sorcery style and how it was established and grew into quite the phenomenon that still creeps in and out of mainstream pop culture.

While this spent a good amount of time on the legendary writer, Robert E. Howard, and his most famous creations Conan and Kull, it also went way beyond that exploring other writers and their work, which helped propel sword and sorcery forward and into the hearts and minds of literary fantasy fans around the world.

The book also shows how sword and sorcery grew beyond just words on a page and how it sort of fell out of popularity but also had a resurgence, later on.

If you love sword and sorcery and you haven’t picked this book up, you definitely should. It’s something I will probably go back to and reference for years to come.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: other books about sword and sorcery literature, comics and film. Especially, the books put out by Pulp Hero Press.

Comic Review: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero – Classics, Vol. 11

Published: April 20th, 2011
Written by: Larry Hama
Art by: Mark Bright, Ron Garney, John Stateman, Lee Weeks
Based on: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero by Hasbro

Marvel Comics (original printing), IDW Publishing (reprinted), 252 Pages

Review:

This may be where the series lost me. Granted, I think I started to feel that way a few volumes back but the series rebounded in a good way.

By this point in the long-running G.I. Joe series, though, it feels like Larry Hama is just running through the motions. Also, I feel less connected to it and less nostalgic for it, as I’ve gotten to the point in the franchise where I stopped paying attention to it when I was a kid.

That had a lot to do with getting older and with the design of the later G.I. Joe toys getting bizarre and ugly. I hated most of the new vehicles of this era, as well as the new characters and old character redesigns. Some things were good from this time but 90 percent of it was garish and impractical. I liked this when it at least felt grounded in some sort of reality.

None of that is specifically Hama’s fault. He didn’t design the toys and new character looks, so he had to make the best out of what was given to him to adapt into the larger story. Besides, this comic’s original purpose was to sell toys.

Like the other volumes I’ve reviewed, this one collects multiple story arcs. Some are fairly interesting but most of them just felt really redundant.

I did like the art, which was changing with the times but this does still generally look like an ’80s era G.I. Joe comic.

Overall, I’d say that this was my least favorite stretch of the original comic series that I’ve read so far. There are still four volumes left but I’ll probably finish the series, being that I’m this far into it.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: Any of the original Marvel G.I. Joe and Transformers comics.