Comic Review: Dark Nights: Metal

Published: June 12th, 2018
Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Greg Capullo

DC Comics, 204 Pages

Review:

I didn’t read this as it came out. I also was much more frugal about how much I spent on comics at the time. I’m less frugal now, as I’m spending more time reviewing them. And to be honest, while this is $30 for the collected edition at my local comic shop, I found this on a brief Comixology sale for $5.99. So at that price, I figured I’d give it a go. If I ended up really liking it, I would’ve gone back to buy the single issues. But I didn’t really like it all that much. I’ll explain.

To start, I typically like Scott Snyder’s writing, especially in regards to anything with Batman in it. As far as Greg Capullo goes, he is one of my favorite artists of the last few decades. So seeing them reunite for this was definitely a selling point, even if what I knew about the project’s story didn’t peak my interest.

The biggest problem with Metal is the same problem with most mega events in comics, it is chock full of so many characters that the plot loses fluidity and the story seems to placate more to wedging in as many cameos as possible, as opposed to keeping the train on the rails.

This wasn’t a bad idea for a story but it should have been kept fairly simple. People just kept showing up on nearly every page, though, and it becomes distracting. New twists and turns are thrown in as often as characters and this just loses its focus. It also introduces a whole horde of villains, most of whom will just be one-offs in this story anyway. But this reads more like a sketchbook than a coherent story. What I mean by that, is that this feels like Capullo trying to fit in every cool design that he wasn’t able to wedge into Spawn throughout his run on the book in the ’90s.

Another thing I didn’t like was how wordy this was. While there are good action scenes, sometimes these characters felt like they weren’t surrounded by villains but instead, were surrounded by word balloons, trying to wedge their way into the panels and asphyxiate the characters. The word balloons were the real villains of the story. At least, that should be a twist whenever this gets a sequel.

I did like how the ending looked into the future as a way to tell you what stories would be coming out from DC Comics over the following year. But, at the same time, this was disappointing to some degree, as a main reason why I picked this up was to see the introduction of DC’s “New Age of Heroes”. I always see mentions that this is where they debuted but their appearance here is limited to one panel where we see into the future.

Anyway, this at least kept my attention over the six issues, even if they felt like twelve due to the dialogue and having so much detail to drink in. I wouldn’t say that this is a waste of time and I can see where this will be a lot of people’s cup of tea. It just wasn’t my cup of tea, really. But I also don’t regret reading it simply because I liked seeing Capullo have fun and get really creative with the art and character design.

Rating: 6/10
Pairs well with: Any other DC Comics mega event of the last decade or so.

Comic Review: Green Arrow: The Outsiders War

Published: November 6th, 2013 – May 7th, 2014
Written by: Jeff Lemire
Art by: Andrea Sorrentino

DC Comics, 157 Pages

Review:

This is the biggest story arc in Jeff Lemire’s run on Green Arrow.

This was also pretty damn intense. But as Lemire’s run on the title rolls on, I have developed a love/hate relationship with it.

For one, I’m not entirely sure of why this version of Oliver Queen lives in Seattle as opposed to Star City and it’s never really been explained within Lemire’s stories. It’s a weird setting for a DC title and maybe trying to ground this in some sort of gritty reality is why they use a real world city but Seattle is hardly some dark and gritty metropolis like Star City has been in the past.

Also, this started bringing in characters and concepts from the TV show Arrow. I’m not sure if that’s because this came out just after the show started and was at its height in popularity but the comic doesn’t need to follow the show or be a comic book version of the show. That show is its own thing and what works on TV isn’t always what works in comics, and vice versa. This is why the show has changed some things but Lemire’s run is adopting some of those changes and characters. But it is also an attempt to make this more accessible to the fans that have only watched the TV series.

The stuff between Oliver and Komodo is really good though. I like the Komodo character, what he represents and how he’s completely altered the course of Oliver’s life.

I like the mystical elements of the story, as well, and it reminds me of old school Iron Fist comics in a lot of ways.

The best thing about Lemire’s run on Green Arrow isn’t Lemire though, at least not for me. The best thing is the art. Andrea Sorrentino has such a unique and incredible style that it breathes more life into these tales. His ability to showcase action in new and exciting ways is really refreshing.

All in all, this is fun if you are a fan of the character, whether through the comics or just from the television series.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: The other story arcs in the Jeff Lemire run on Green Arrow.

Comic Review: Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Vol. 3

Published: January 30th, 2014
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: David Marquez, Kaare Kyle Andrews

Marvel Comics, 171 Pages

Review:

The last collection in this series left you hanging, wondering what was going to happen in regards to Miles Morales being blackmailed by his Uncle Aaron into helping him take out the Scorpion and build his own criminal empire. Uncle Aaron is the famous Spidey villain the Prowler and of course, Miles is just getting his feet wet as the new Spider-Man.

This starts off with a massive bang that changes Miles’ life forever. I don’t want to spoil it but I’ll just say that up to this point, Miles has never been in a situation where the responsibilities of being Spider-Man have been more real and hit as close to home.

The rest of the book deals with a massive battle that sees Miles team up with the Ultimates, who are the Marvel Ultimate universe’s version of the Avengers. He convinces Captain America to let him join, despite his age, but this leads to him being a soldier in a violent war against Hydra. Even for Marvel and for Spider-Man, this is so unbelievable that it just doesn’t work, at all. Despite how good Miles is and where his heart is at, anyone who would send a thirteen year-old to war is an insane person. I’m looking at you Captain America, also the president of the United States in this continuity. But really, I’m looking at Brian Michael Bendis who wrote this asinine and preposterous storyline. I mean, seriously, what the fucking fuck?!

This isn’t Robin helping Batman or some New Mutants adventure, this is an all out war for America between the Ultimates, S.H.I.E.L.D. and Hydra. Professor X never sent Boom Boom to face off with Apocalypse. Batman never sent Robin into an Arkham Asylum riot without proper training.

Additionally, the big war was a massive distraction to the larger arc here, which is Miles becoming Spider-Man and finding himself in that role. This was one giant speed bump in this series but I hope that things come back down to Earth in the volume after this one.

I really liked this series, up to this point. This didn’t just jump the shark, it jumped an ocean full of sharks.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: The other early Mile Morales Spider-Man stories. Also, Spider-Men I and II and Spider-Verse.

Comic Review: Mr. Crypt

Published: August 24th, 2016 – February 2nd, 2017
Written by: Troy Vevasis
Art by: Aleksandar Jovic

Alterna Comics, 75 Pages

Review:

Sometimes you just want some lighthearted, childish fun. Well, I do at least. You may feel different but if that’s the case, you need to look into your soul and say, “Hey, ass hat! Stop being so damn serious and miserable!”

Anyway, Mr. Crypt came to me when I ordered a couple random bundles of stuff from Alterna Comics. I read through the first issue, it made me smile, I felt good and then I sadly realized that I didn’t have issues two or three. I then quickly ordered them because I wanted to have the entire run of this series.

Now you don’t need to read each issue to get the effect of what Mr. Crypt is, as each book is its own self-contained story. However, some gags and in-jokes happen throughout and it’s better to have the entire context then just a single issue. Plus, it’s enjoyable and amusing and you should want to buy them anyway. Plus, these are Alterna comics and only cost $1.50.

The main character here is a re-animated skeleton. The townsfolk freak out whenever they see him, so he wears a disguise. There’s a running joke across all the issues about Mr. Crypt’s mustache, which often times blows off in the worst moments, giving him away. Mr. Crypt also has a friend, a rat named Baron Rat.

The first issue of three is used to setup the story and establish the character, as well as the tone of the series. The second issue sees Mr. Crypt get pulled into some vampire hunting shenanigans. The third sends him off on a vacation but there is a twist and he ends up dealing with some angry island natives.

There is also a one-shot Baron Rat spinoff but I really hope that there is more of Mr. Crypt in the future. While this isn’t the type of comic book that I typically read, it’s refreshing and silly enough to make me a fan of it. It’s also something that works for kids and adult audiences.

Ultimately, it reminds me of the comic strips from the paper that I read as a kid before I got into actual comic books. Except, this is cooler than a lot of the comic strips of yesteryear.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: Other Alterna Comics releases.

Comic Review: Avengers: Disassembled

Published: January 26th, 2005
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: David Finch

Marvel Comics, 133 Pages

Review:

This is one of those iconic stories that you hear about all the time in comic book circles. However, I thought that the whole thing was pretty damn underwhelming for what it has been built up as.

The Avengers team gets ripped apart. It is due to the betrayal of one of their own. They don’t know that at first and when confronted with the idea, reject it.

However, the Scarlet Witch has basically gone batshit and blames all of her friends for killing her children that were never actually real to begin with but a psychotic projection of the Scarlet Witch’s will.

Yeah, does this story sound stupid to you? Because it definitely felt stupid to me. I thought Bendis was a big deal but everything I read by him is just as batshit as the Scarlet Witch, Wanda’s fucked up brain in this story. I’ve just never been too keen on Bendis, other than his earliest work on the Miles Morales Spider-Man stuff. His Superman stories, his current job, are also just some weird ass shit.

I don’t know, this book hurt my head. It’s only saving grace was superb art from David Finch and awesome action sequences.

Also, this leads into the big Civil War event that effected all Marvel titles, as well as the major X-Men events: The House of M and The Messiah Complex.

Avengers Disassembled has been talked about fondly for years by many. I’m just glad that this was only 133 pages.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: This leads into the massive X-Men stories The House of M and The Messiah Complex, also it has ramifications that carry over on the Avengers side of things and into the Civil War event.

Comic Review: Secret Agent Deadpool

Published: September 5th, 2018
Written by: Christopher Hastings
Art by: Salvador Espin, David Nakayama

Marvel Comics, 24 Pages

Review:

People love Deadpool. People love James Bond. But people did not love If Looks Could Kill, the 1991 Richard Grieco movie where he was mistaken for a famous spy while on a high school trip to Europe. Okay, I kind of liked that movie when I was in middle school but I was still able to realize that it was terrible and that it bombed critically and commercially. It was just one of those dumb motion pictures that was my cup of tea when I was twelve.

The reason I even bring up that long forgotten action teen comedy is because the plot was basically the same thing as this comic. Okay, Deadpool wasn’t an American high school student scoping out the ladies over exotic crepes but he was mistaken as a spy by that spy’s own agency. Because apparently DNA tests and shit don’t exist within the walls of a high tech agency in 2018.

Anyway, this comic is a good example of why I don’t really like Deadpool or at least why I haven’t liked him since like 1994 or so. He’s just straight comedy, all the time and he’s a one note character that isn’t really that interesting when you get past the jokes. And when the jokes aren’t funny and the shtick has run stale, which it did for me a long time ago, you’re left with a boring comic that doesn’t serve much purpose. Well, I guess this serves the purpose of being a cash grab for the publisher, thanks to the hardcore ‘Pool fans out there, most of whom didn’t exist until Ryan Reynolds came along.

I just don’t find Deadpool stories to be all that interesting. Sometimes you have a good story but it’s when the plot is a bit more grounded and it has other well-known characters that can add another layer of depth to the proceedings. Deadpool just running rampant on his own doesn’t work for me.

This tried to be funny but nothing really hit the mark. The art wasn’t very good either and this doesn’t feel like what a Marvel book should feel like. But this is also not a printed comic, it is a Comixology exclusive and made for the digital market.

I guess I can’t complain because it was free with my subscription but this was a bore to get through and I won’t download the second issue.

Rating: 4.75/10
Pairs well with: Other modern Deadpool comics. But really, just man the fuck up and read Deathstroke.

Comic Review: The Immortal Hulk: Or Is He Both?

Published: June 6th, 2018 – September 5th, 2018
Written by: Al Ewing
Art by: Joe Bennett, Alex Ross (covers)

Marvel Comics, 128 Pages

Review:

I wanted to support this for two reasons.

One, I love Bruce Banner and I thought that it was great to have him back. Nothing beats the original Hulk and this new take on the character, where the green Hulk is now more intelligent than Banner, peaked my interest.

Two, and this is incredibly superficial, but I love these Alex Ross covers, especially the first issue. It was very Frankenstein-esque and totally f’n badass.

The problem with this story arc, which takes place over the first five issues of this new series, is that it, like the Hulk, has multiple personality disorder. With that disorder, though, it’s level of quality is incredibly inconsistent from issue to issue.

Issue one was a pretty good introduction to this updated version of the Hulk. Issue two was really f’d up but damn intriguing and frankly, I loved it. Issue three, however, was so bad, I was astonished at how poorly it was crafted after being really happy with the book’s first two outings. The fourth issue was pretty much just boring filler, trying to explain the story, as the first three issues didn’t have a lot of detail and mostly just focused on the Hulk being a real force of nature with an attitude similar to the Punisher. The fifth and final issue pits the Hulk against Alpha Flight’s Sasquatch but there is a big twist and you discover that Hulk is just battling his own daddy issues. *exhales loudly* Really? …Really?

I wanted to like this, I truly did.

I liked the beginning of the arc, I thought the art was solid and I liked the tone of this darker yet smarter Hulk tale. But by the time I got to the end of the story, I wanted to chuck these comics into the fireplace. I don’t own a fireplace, though. Florida is too hot for that shit.

This first arc was the test to see if I was going to end up adding this to my pull list. I won’t. I’m done with this series. That is, unless someone whose opinion I trust continues to read it and tells me it’s gotten better. Unless that happens, I’ve got mountains of other comics to read.

Rating: 5.25/10
Pairs well with: I don’t know, not a whole lot, really. This is pretty unique and it’s great to have Banner back but the tone is so different from older Banner stories. But maybe read Damage, which is DC Comics’ new character that is very Hulk-like but a better read, right now.