Film Review: Delta Force 2: The Colombian Connection (1990)

Also known as: America’s Red Army: Delta Force II, Delta Force II: Operation Crackdown, Spitfire: Delta Force II (working titles), Delta Force 2: Operation Stranglehold (Uruguay subtitled version), Comando Delta 2 (Brazil)
Release Date: May, 1990 (Cannes)
Directed by: Aaron Norris
Written by: Lee Reynolds
Based on: characters by James Bruner, Menahem Golan
Music by: Frederic Talgorn
Cast: Chuck Norris, Billy Drago, John P. Ryan, Paul Perri, Richard Jaeckel, Begona Plaza, Mateo Gomez, Hector Mercado, Mark Margolis

Golan-Globus Productions, Cannon Films, 111 Minutes

Review:

“Take her to my bedroom – first give her a beautiful bath – get rid of the baby.” – Ramon Cota

This didn’t really need to be Delta Force 2. I mean, it’s got Chuck Norris and he’s kicking the shit out of stuff but he didn’t need to be the same character, he could’ve been any random Chuck Norris character or a new one and it wouldn’t have mattered. I guess Delta Force had some branding and name recognition built into it but this just feels so different than the original film.

But hey, it’s still a damn fine action picture that was put out by the maestros of ’80s action, Cannon Films. It hits the right notes, it has a good level of senseless violence and not only does it star Chuck Norris but it stars the always stupendous Billy Drago.

In fact, this is one of my favorite roles Drago has ever played. He is absolute perfection as the evil and slithery villain, Ramon Cota. Hell, Drago’s performance here should be considered an acting lesson on how to play sadistic drug lords. The dude can just convey so much with so little. He speaks with his face and his eyes in a way that the best actors in the world can’t.

It’s pretty damn sad that we lost Drago and his talent a few weeks ago. In fact, that’s why I watched this movie. I wanted to be reminded as to why I became a lifelong fan of his in the first place, as this movie was my first experience seeing him haunt the minds of heroes.

Now apart from Norris and Drago, we also get John P. Ryan as an American general who doesn’t care whose toes he steps on, Mark Margolis as a Colombian general in league with Drago’s Cota, as well as Hector Mercado as an undercover agent.

The cast is stacked full of manly men who are very capable of giving this sort of film life. And despite not having Lee Marvin, Bo Svenson, George Kennedy, Robert Forster, Robert Vaughn and Steve James, I enjoy this movie a wee bit more than its predecessor.

This came out towards the end of Cannon’s dominance over the action film genre but it still measures up to their other kickass pictures.

I can see why people consider the first one to be a better movie (and it probably is) but I just love Drago, Norris and how well they play off of each other in this. Norris needed a true villain and Drago was exactly that. He was the Joker to Norris’ Batman.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: the first Delta Force, as well as the Missing In Action trilogy and other Chuck Norris films for Cannon.

Film Review: Invasion U.S.A. (1985)

Also known as: Invasion (working title)
Release Date: September 25th, 1985
Directed by: Joseph Zito
Written by: James Bruner, Chuck Norris, Aaron Norris
Music by: Jay Chattaway
Cast: Chuck Norris, Richard Lynch, Melissa Prophet, Billy Drago

Cannon Films, 107 Minutes

Review:

“If you come back in, I’ll hit you with so many rights you’ll be begging for a left.” – Matt Hunter

Cannon Films were synonymous with super violent action films. Invasion U.S.A. may feel like the most Cannon film ever. Well, at least in regards to the amount of bullets and carnage that fills up the screen in its 107 minute running time. But even with Chuck Norris, there isn’t enough to make this film anywhere near as epic as it should be but that’s due to some slower moments, which I’ll discuss below.

The film is similar to Red Dawn, except it stars the ginger martial arts king and not a group of bratty kids trying to avenge their town and wrestle away communist control.

Essentially, the title says it all. America is invaded and since this came out in the ’80s, when Cold War fear was still a thing, we see our city streets being overtaken by communist scum. Well, the film mostly takes place in and around Miami. Norris plays Matt Hunter, a generic badass American action name straight out of the ’80s. Hunter is a denim clad, sleeveless ruffian that lives in the Everglades, drives an airboat and never runs out of ammo or guns to fill with ammo. He’s like a living, breathing cheat code in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City.

The problem with this movie isn’t the ultraviolence because that shit is the most amazing thing about this picture, the problem is that when there isn’t ultraviolence, the film is a real bore. The action heavy scenes are really awesome to watch but the filler is terrible. I don’t care about these characters enough that I need to see them developed. I know who the evil one is, I know who the hero is, so just give them guns and let them shoot at each other until Miami is Swiss cheese. What’s with all the talking and driving around making tough guy faces? Grab a gun, stick a grenade up a dude’s ass and kill everything that moves.

Why this needs a running time longer than 80 minutes is beyond my level of comprehension. I guess Chuck Norris contributed to the writing and wanted to add some plot to this thing but Mr. Norris needs to stick to filling communists with bullets and sharp objects and leave the writing to more capable people who don’t care about their characters and just want to murder them as violently as possible for their art.

Still, the action and ultraviolence makes this a damn fun time. But that’s all this is, a quick watch with a lot of cool manly shit where you should probably fast-forward through those pointless talkie bits.

On a side note, I just picked up this film’s soundtrack on vinyl in pretty pristine condition.

Rating: 6.25/10
Pairs well with: Any film where America is invaded by commie scum and the Reds still get their ass kicked.

TV Review: The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. (1993-1994)

Original Run: August 27th, 1993 – May 20th, 1994
Created by: Jeffrey Boam, Carlton Cuse
Directed by: various
Written by: various
Music by: Velton Ray Bunch, Stephen Graziano, Randy Edelman
Cast: Bruce Campbell, Julius Carry, Christian Clemenson, Kelly Rutherford, John Astin, Billy Drago, M. C. Gainey, R. Lee Ermey (cameo), Tracey Walter

Boam/Cuse Productions, Warner Bros. Television, 27 Episodes, 45 Minutes (per episode)

briscocountyReview:

I have been a huge fan of Bruce Campbell since first experiencing the Evil Dead films in the 80s. However, as much as I love his character Ash, my favorite role Campbell has ever had is Brisco County, Jr. This is, hands down, the greatest thing Campbell has ever been a part of and it still bothers me, over twenty years later, that the show ended after a single season.

In the same vein as The Wild, Wild West (the show, not the atrocious movie), The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. mixes the western and science fiction genres. It also adds in lighthearted but excellent comedy and a family friendly level of violence, as it isn’t really violent at all.

Bruce Campbell plays the title character, Brisco County, Jr. He is a bounty hunter who is trying to round up all the men who helped murder his father, a U.S. Marshall (played by R. Lee Ermey). He finds himself pitted against John Bly (played by the always enigmatic Billy Drago), as well as Bly’s gang. Gang members, Big Smith (played by M.C. Gainey) and Pete Hutter (played by John Pyper-Ferguson) are fantastic characters that have a lot of depth and make this show even more enjoyable. Pete Hutter is actually one of my favorite comedic villains of all-time. But nothing is as cold, chilling and evil as Billy Dargo’s John Bly. He is still one of the best television and western villains I have ever seen.

On the heroic side, Brisco is joined by the lawyer Socrates Poole (played by Christian Clemenson) and rival/friend bounty hunter Lord Bowler (played by the perfectly casted Julius Carry). The camaraderie between Brisco and Bowler is amazing. They are one of the great all-time buddy pairings. The inclusion of Clemenson rounds out the trio and makes a stellar team. They are also assisted, at times, by Professor Wickwire (John Astin a.k.a. Gomez from The Addams Family) and Dixie Cousins (Kelly Rutherford in her best role).

In addition to apprehending the John Bly Gang, Brisco keeps finding himself involved with a mysterious object called “The Orb”. In fact, it is the one thing that John Bly is after. The Orb brings a supernatural element to the show that is refreshing and new. This show still feels like it is one-of-a-kind, even today, because of things like the Orb and the way that it was always looking to the future and teased technological innovations before their time.

27 episodes weren’t enough, even though the show does leave you with a somewhat satisfying ending. At least the main story arc is closed by the end of the season with a few hints at the future sprinkled in. It would’ve been awesome if it had kept moving forward though.

According to the creators, the second season would have seen Brisco becoming the sheriff of a small town while settling down with Dixie and having a family.