Comic Review: Nightwing: The New Order

Published: March 8th, 2018
Written by: Kyle Higgins
Art by: Trevor McCarthy

DC Comics, 144 Pages

Review:

This came highly recommended from several people who have pretty good taste in comics. However, high recommendations usually lead to me feeling underwhelmed. This doesn’t underwhelm though, at least it didn’t for me.

Nightwing is a murdering fascist prick in this story, which is essentially an Elseworlds tale, even though DC Comics doesn’t have that imprint anymore. Well, DC should resurrect it. I love stories from alternate realities and how the regular rules don’t apply.

The main part of the story takes place in 2040 but even the flashbacks are in the future, as they are twelve years in the past from the main story. Nightwing took it upon himself to use a device that took the powers away from Earth’s superheroes. This caused a major event where many heroes and villains died as a result. Nightwing did a dark and dirty thing in order to save the Earth, as he felt that he needed to. Years later, his identity is public and as Dick Grayson, he is the face of the government agency that keeps the superpowered population of America in check. He’s a total Orwellian fascist that constantly has to justify his evil decisions and actions.

However, Dick’s whole world comes crumbling down when it is discovered that his son has powers. Dick in a typical “holier than thou/the rules don’t apply to the rulers” hypocritical turn, sees his agency turn on him in an effort to bring in his son. Dick goes on the run from the law that he established, getting more and more woke to the reality of the world he created.

We get to see the Titans of the future show up, we even get Lois Lane as a Blue Lantern and see Superman and Lex Luthor working together for a better future. We get to see what Tim Drake and Alfred are up to as well. Plus, there are cameos by the John Stewart Green Lantern and Mr. Freeze; both of them work for the fascist government. But the main person hunting Dick Grayson is the former Batwoman, Katherine Kane. Kane is now the head of Dick’s fascist agency and she is a stone cold tyrant.

I liked the story, I thought it was mostly executed well, even though Dick seemed to change his mind too quickly and always seemed like a fish out of water once he got in over his head. He sort of just got pulled along for the ride by the midpoint of the story and things happened around him even though it was all directly related to his story.

The real high point was the art. Trevor McCarthy did a fabulous job, there was great detail and this didn’t feel like many of the other modern comics where lazy artists use an overabundance of 3D models and Google Images run through a filter. I’m not saying that McCarthy didn’t do this but it certainly wasn’t noticeable.

Nightwing: The New Order reminded me a lot of the great Elseworlds tale Superman: Red Son, which is really high praise. There were some similar themes and the tone was very dystopian.

I’m glad that I picked this up, as Nightwing has been a favorite character of mine since I was a child that regularly read Batman and Teen Titans comics in the ’80s.

Rating: 8/10
Pairs well with: Superman: Red Son. As well as the Nightwing and Titans series since the start of DC’s Rebirth era.

Comic Review: Batman: Night of the Monster Men

Published: February 28th, 2017
Written by: Tom King, Steve Orlando, Tim Seeley, James Tynion IV
Art by: Riley Rossmo

DC Comics, 144 Pages

Review:

I haven’t been too keen on the Rebirth stuff by DC Comics. I also didn’t like the big Batman story that I read by Tom King, The War of Jokes and Riddles. However, a friend told me that there was a story that King did that pitted Batman and his team against kaiju that were wrecking Gotham City. Kaiju are big monsters like Godzilla or King Kong for those who aren’t familiar with the term.

I’m a big kaiju fan, so it was hard for me to not check out a story where Batman must confront giant beasts. Plus, I should give King another shot and Tim Seeley also contributed to the story and I’ve always liked his work, especially his Hack/Slash and G.I. Joe stuff.

I did enjoy this more than The War of Jokes and Riddles but it still didn’t leave me with much faith in this Rebirth era of DC Comics.

The story brings in Hugo Strange as the big baddie. He does some experiments that turn patients into kaiju that are unleashed on Gotham in an effort to draw out and destroy Batman. Strange tries his best to outwit the Caped Crusader and stays one step ahead until Batman once again finds a way to use the mad professor’s overconfidence against him.

The book is action heavy, which was great. Also, the monster designs were pretty cool and unique. However, the story wasn’t that interesting. In fact, it was kind of dull. Also, there are all these new people that are part of Batman’s team that I just don’t care about. I’m a bigger fan of Batman working alone or in a very small group. This felt like it was trying to be like the Arrow TV show with all these random copycat heroes.

However, Clayface is now on Team Batman, which I actually quite enjoyed even if it caught me completely off guard at first. There is this really cool scene where Batman wears Clayface like extra armor, which was just neat to see.

Night of the Monster Men had some good moments but not enough to make me happy that I spent money on it or that will probably make me want to ever pick it up again.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: For superheroes versus giant kaiju monsters, check out Marvel’s run on Godzilla. Also, other Batman arcs under the Rebirth brand.