Comic Review: The Man of Steel (2018 Miniseries)

Published: May 30th, 2018
Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Jason Fabok, Ivan Reis, Joe Prado, Alex Sinclair, Steve Rude, Evan Shaner, Ryan Sook, Wade von Grawbadger, Kevin Maguire, Adam Hughes

DC Comics, 155 Pages

Review:

Brian Michael Bendis lost me a long time ago. But when he left Marvel for DC Comics and was given a weekly Superman miniseries to write, I was intrigued. It had been a while since I really got into a Superman story and even longer since Bendis wowed me. Would these two forces coming together give us something great?

Well, not really. But this did get off to a really strong start. I’ll explain.

This story is stretched over six issues that were released weekly, as a lead-in to the Bendis Superman ongoing series. The story started out really strong and it had me hooked over the first four issues. Things changed as I got to issue five though and I didn’t like the conclusion. Anything after this sentence is going into major spoiler territory, so you’ve been warned.

A new villain has arrived in the DC universe and his name is Rogol Zaar. Apparently, Zaar was instrumental in the cataclysmic event that destroyed Krypton. Now, he wants to do the same thing to Earth, as he must “cleanse” it from Kryptonians. I thought that Zaar was a pretty cool and intimidating villain but his design could have been better. He kind of just looks like a generic cosmic brute that Superman or a Green Lantern would take out after a bit of a struggle on the way to fighting a badder, major villain.

Ultimately, Superman gets help from Supergirl and his Justice League pals: Batman, Wonder Woman, the Hal Jordan Green Lantern, Cyborg and the Flash.

Superman also has to deal with the surprise appearance of his father, who randomly crashed into his apartment to take his grandson away for some sort of training experience. Superman’s son Jonathan wants to go but Supes and Lois Lane don’t agree. Then everyone ends up ganging up on Superman and cucks him out (for lack of a better description) and his son and Lois both leave with his dad, leaving him alone clutching a teddy bear. For real, this happens and it is baffling as hell seeing Superman without balls.

Then in the final battle, Superman is struggling and Supergirl just shows up and throws the big bad guy into the Negative Zone in the most anticlimactic, easy and bullshit ending possible. So he was upstaged by his little cousin like it was no big deal.

Yeah, the last two issues had me scratching my head and then I remembered what was going on here and his name is Brian Michael Bendis. For four issues, Bendis had his audience back in the palm of his hand and then he Bendised the fuck out of us!

Now I can excuse this dime store bullshit if it actually leads to something better and greater for the ongoing Superman series but I’m going to go into that title with serious caution.

It’s just that 66.7 percent of this story was really damn good. I don’t know if Bendis does this shit on purpose or if he just has good ideas without the ability to close out his stories.

In any event, this miniseries and the regular series to follow are going to have a major impact on the larger Superman mythos. Hell, they already have by making Rogol Zaar the force behind the destruction of Krypton.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: One would assume, the upcoming Superman series by Brian Michael Bendis.

Comic Review: Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 1

Published: July 25th, 2017
Written by: James Tynion IV
Art by: Freddie Williams II

IDW Publishing, DC Comics, 176 Pages

Review:

When this was first announced, I got pretty excited. But at the time, hunting down single issues of comics was hard for me, as my closest comic book shops are both 45 minutes in opposite directions. So I planned on waiting for it to be collected in a trade paperback format.

I mean, who doesn’t want to read a team up of Batman and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? On top of that, who doesn’t want to see Batman fight Shredder? Yeah, because that’s just about all I could think about when I first heard that this crossover was happening.

You get more than that though. You also get to see Shredder team up with Ra’s al Ghul and several Batman villains get exposed to mutagen and thus, turn into TMNT styled animal villains. The Penguin obviously becomes a penguin but my favorite was Mr. Freeze as a polar bear. You also get to see Casey Jones show up about midway through the story arc.

Overall, this was a lot of fun. I heard that the follow up wasn’t as good but I’ll read that once it’s complete. I think there are still issues coming out for that sequel run.

This comic is really just fan service done really well. It’s not an exceptional story but it doesn’t need to be. It just needs to take these two franchises and smash them together and let everyone loose.

One of the highlights for me was seeing Alfred interact with Michelangelo. That shit was comedy gold.

I can’t call this a great book but if you love both franchises this is certainly worth your ten or fifteen bucks.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 2 and other recent TMNT crossovers.

Comic Review: Batman Confidential: A New Dawn

Published: February 11th, 2009
Written by: Nunzio DeFilippis, Christina Weir
Art by: Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, I.L.L., David Baron, Kevin Nowlan

DC Comics, 72 Pages

Review:

For fans of the 1966 Batman television show, this story arc is somewhat of a big deal. It is the comic book debut of King Tut, who was a villain created for the ’60s show but who had never been in comic book form before this.

It is a bit disappointing though, because this is an all new King Tut and not the same character that the charismatic and fun Victor Buono played from 1966 to 1968.

All things considered, this was still a good story and it even had elements of classic film-noir to it. I won’t get into those details, as it may spoil the plot.

This also sees Batman form a short lived partnership with the Riddler, as Batman needs Nygma’s mind to help anticipate Tut’s moves.

I’ve always been into ancient Egyptian stuff so that made this a worthwhile experience for me, even if this wasn’t the King Tut I was hoping for.

The plot was well constructed, kept me engaged and I enjoyed the art and the nice little twist at the end.

I meant to buy these issues back in 2009 when they were first announced. I had one of them and then recently found the other two while looking for something else at one of my local comic shops.

I wish that this had opened the door for Batman Confidential to explore other ’60s TV villains but all we got was this attempt at King Tut. The story was also left open ended for Tut to return but as far as I know, he never did.

For those of you who would like to read this, the story arc is featured in Batman Confidential issues 26, 27 and 28.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: The Batman ’66 stories that feature King Tut. Also, other story arcs released as part of Batman Confidential.

Video Game Review: Batman: Arkham Knight (PlayStation 4)

*I played the PlayStation 4 version. The game is also available on Xbox One and Windows.

Playing this was long overdue.

This is one of my favorite video game series of the last ten years and it is the best video game series to star a comic book hero. Also, it stars the coolest hero.

Out of all the Arkham games this is probably the best one overall. I think I liked Arkham City a bit more but this one had so much content and new elements added to it that it really takes the cake from a narrative and technical standpoint.

I guess the biggest addition to this chapter in the series is that it is the first game where you can drive the Batmobile. And you don’t just get to drive it, you get to do battle with it. There are a lot of parts in the game where you have to go into vehicular combat and there are different styles, as well. There are side missions that play out like straight up car chases and then there are other missions where you go into “battle mode” and you are essentially a tank in a firefight with other tanks and aerial drones. It’s actually pretty incredible stuff and this element never got old.

The only Batmobile stuff I didn’t like was the racetrack sequences, which are worked into the Riddler side missions. I don’t play Batman games to race cars, I play them to save Gotham City from scum and villainy. They also work the Batmobile into the equation where you have to solve some of the Riddler’s puzzles. I love the Riddler, I just liked his side missions the least because of these bits.

I liked the new Arkham Knight character, even though it became fairly obvious who he was and that he wasn’t actually a new character but just a new twist on a known character. I also like that changes to his character were instrumental in Deathstroke coming into the game. But sadly, you don’t get to exchange fisticuffs with him. But that leads me to one other minor problem with the game.

There are no real boss battles. Well, there are big boss battle feeling moments like when you take on the Arkham Knight’s tank or when you reach the big crescendo in the Mr. Freeze side missions but you never actually fight any of the major villains with your fists except for Killer Croc.

Still, I do like how the big battles go down in the game. I just wish that I got to have more intimate physical encounters.

And man, there are a ton of villains. And even though the Joker is dead, he is very much a big presence in the game but I don’t want to reveal how, as that will spoil the story. But Mark Hamill, as the Joker, probably has as much dialogue in the game as Batman.

I liked that Scarecrow was the biggest villain in the game, as he’s a character that gets shafted in favor of the better known villains in Batman lore. Plus, the version of Scarecrow used in this game series is my favorite version of the character to date.

Ultimately, this is the best game in the series overall and thus, I’d say it is the best superhero video game that I have ever played. It brings the story full circle and is a nice conclusion to Rocksteady’s Batman franchise.

But really, I hope that this isn’t the actual end. I’d love to see a Nightwing, Red Hood or Batgirl game spun off from this series.

Rating: 9.25/10
Pairs well with: The three previous Batman: Arkham games.

Comic Review: Batman: The Joker’s Apprentice

Published: March 3rd, 1999
Written by: C.J. Henderson
Art by: Trevor Von Eeden, Joe Rubinstein, Pamela Rambo, Patrick Martin (cover)

DC Comics, 55 Pages

Review:

I don’t know what it was about some of the artists that worked on Batman titles in the ’90s but a lot of the art was terrible. It was overly stylized and extreme. Lots of jagged edges, thick inking and over exaggerated changes to the look of Batman like really long ears and pointy edges where there shouldn’t be pointy edges (like on his shoulders).

In this comic, there are scenes where his mask just looks like a complete hood with glowing eyes and overly exaggerated pointy ears. There are a lot of reasons why I lost interest in comics in the mid-to-late ’90s and the weird art is one of the biggest reasons.

This is mostly an ugly book to look at. I wanted to enjoy the story and give it a real shot though, as the premise sounded interesting.

It’s a pretty flat and uneventful one shot, however. It is what no comic book should be and that’s dull.

The Joker finds this guy, trains him to be a psycho serial killer and watches him terrorize Gotham City. The apprentice commits grisly murders and raises fear. But ultimately, he is pretty useless and easily taken out once Batman catches up to him.

So what was the point? There wasn’t any, other than this being Joker’s gift to Batman on the fifth anniversary of their first meeting.

This was only 55 pages but it was a tough 55 pages to get through.

Rating: 4/10
Pairs well with: Meh. Just don’t read this.

Comic Review: Batman: Night of the Monster Men

Published: February 28th, 2017
Written by: Tom King, Steve Orlando, Tim Seeley, James Tynion IV
Art by: Riley Rossmo

DC Comics, 144 Pages

Review:

I haven’t been too keen on the Rebirth stuff by DC Comics. I also didn’t like the big Batman story that I read by Tom King, The War of Jokes and Riddles. However, a friend told me that there was a story that King did that pitted Batman and his team against kaiju that were wrecking Gotham City. Kaiju are big monsters like Godzilla or King Kong for those who aren’t familiar with the term.

I’m a big kaiju fan, so it was hard for me to not check out a story where Batman must confront giant beasts. Plus, I should give King another shot and Tim Seeley also contributed to the story and I’ve always liked his work, especially his Hack/Slash and G.I. Joe stuff.

I did enjoy this more than The War of Jokes and Riddles but it still didn’t leave me with much faith in this Rebirth era of DC Comics.

The story brings in Hugo Strange as the big baddie. He does some experiments that turn patients into kaiju that are unleashed on Gotham in an effort to draw out and destroy Batman. Strange tries his best to outwit the Caped Crusader and stays one step ahead until Batman once again finds a way to use the mad professor’s overconfidence against him.

The book is action heavy, which was great. Also, the monster designs were pretty cool and unique. However, the story wasn’t that interesting. In fact, it was kind of dull. Also, there are all these new people that are part of Batman’s team that I just don’t care about. I’m a bigger fan of Batman working alone or in a very small group. This felt like it was trying to be like the Arrow TV show with all these random copycat heroes.

However, Clayface is now on Team Batman, which I actually quite enjoyed even if it caught me completely off guard at first. There is this really cool scene where Batman wears Clayface like extra armor, which was just neat to see.

Night of the Monster Men had some good moments but not enough to make me happy that I spent money on it or that will probably make me want to ever pick it up again.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: For superheroes versus giant kaiju monsters, check out Marvel’s run on Godzilla. Also, other Batman arcs under the Rebirth brand.

Comic Review: Batman Arkham – Man-Bat

Published: January 31st, 2017
Written by: various
Art by: various

DC Comics, 296 Pages

Review:

Having read several of these Batman Arkham collections, I have been inspired to read and collect them all. I love historical anthologies that feature stories about a single character, spanning decades from creation to the most modern incarnation. Like all the other books in this series, this one featuring Man-Bat starts off with a bang. But then things went off the rails for me.

It has been a really long time since I’ve read them, but the earliest appearances of Man-Bat were incredible and those issues of Detective Comics where he first appears are some of the best Batman stories of the early ’70s.

Following that stuff, this book features the first two issues of the ’70s Man-Bat comic, which I have never read. Yes, Man-Bat had his own starring title, albeit short-lived.

We then get into the ’80s where we see a more modernized version of the character’s origin. But as is the problem with some of these collections, we see more variant origin stories than we do just cool tales featuring the character outside of rehashing their beginnings.

As we get into the ’90s stuff, we are treated to the good writing of Chuck Dixon, whose IDW G.I. Joe stuff I loved in the late ’00s and early ’10s. While his tales are engaging the blatantly ’90s art style is incredibly hard to look at and really ruins those stories. They are a visual mess and unpleasant to look at. The pencils and ink are done to the extreme with thick lines and too much detail. It’s like Man-Bat needs a billion creases all over his body and to be covered in nonsensical shadows that defy any real lighting source. And everything just looks overly grotesque to the comic’s supreme detriment.

When we get into the stories from this millennium, we are treated to another rehash of Man-Bat’s origin.

For the most part, I liked this collection because the high points are damn good. As the book rolls on, however, you’re taken on strange, ugly rides. Maybe there just isn’t enough Man-Bat material to make a collection work.

The first third of this collection is great. It’s just a lot less engaging by the time you reach the late ’80s stuff and onward. The final story, which was made very recently, was a step up from the ’90s stuff but it didn’t serve much of a purpose.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: Other Batman Arkham collections.