Documentary Review: Moebius Redux: A Life In Pictures (2007)

Release Date: 2007 (Germany, France)
Directed by: Hasko Baumann
Written by: Hasko Baumann
Music by: Aaa
Cast: Jean Giraud (Moebius), H.R. Giger, Stan Lee, Jim Lee, Mike Mignola, Dan O’Bannon, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Philippe Druillet, Enki Bilal

Arte France, Avanti Media, Morag Loves Company, 68 Minutes

Review:

I’ve admired Moebius’ artwork for years. However, I sadly didn’t know much about the man until this documentary.

Sure, I knew that he was an artist’s artist and that he has been praised longer than I’ve been alive but I never delved beyond just his art. But I guess that’s my crime and I missed out on not knowing more about Jean Giraud, the man behind the pseudonym.

This short film interviews a lot of iconic people from Alejandro Jodorowsky to Stan Lee to H.R. Giger to Jim Lee to Mike Mignola and they all give their two cents on Moebius and the impact of his work on the comic book and film mediums, as well as his influence on their own work.

Most importantly though, this spends a lot of time with Giraud, as he gives his story, in his own words. He talks about his influences and how Moebius evolved over time, working in the western genre and then sci-fi, fantasy and other styles that come with their own sets of tropes.

This was just a cool documentary about a guy that’s cooler than most people.

Moebius is an extremely talented artist and on top of that, his life is compelling and fascinating.

I’d say that this is definitely a must see for those who love the comic book medium and intriguing creatives with a hell of a lot of passion and imagination.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other comic artist documentaries. I’ve reviewed a ton of them here, already.

Documentary Review: Jodorowsky’s Dune (2013)

Release Date: May 18th, 2013 (Cannes)
Directed by: Frank Pavich
Music by: Kurt Stenzel

City Film, Snowfort Pictures, Sony Pictures Classics, 90 Minutes

Review:

While this movie does shit all over the David Lynch adaptation, I won’t let me personal feelings on the matter get in the way of enjoying this documentary and experiencing the vision that Alejandro Jodorowsky had for Frank Herbert’s Dune.

The guy certainly has a gift for creativity and an interesting vision and his Dune certainly would have been an incredibly unique experience that could have beat Star Wars to the cultural phenomenon punch and actually have been the trendsetter for big blockbusters to come.

However, this is one of those things that probably looks a lot cooler on paper and I can’t blame Hollywood for not making it. It’s bizarre and I just don’t see how it would have connected with the general public. Sure, art house film lovers would have probably ate it up but there’s no way that this bizarre movie would have captured audiences’ attention like Star Wars did.

The problem I have with it, is what Jodorowsky loves about it. It is his vision and really, a bastardization of Frank Herbert’s iconic science fiction novel, which is considered by many to be a sci-fi bible.

Jodorowsky could make his own sci-fi epic with as different as this film would have been from its source material. While the Lynch adaptation was ruined by producers, at least it had the story mostly right and his visual work is still what I see in my head when I read any Dune book. And Lynch’s creation certainly fits the tone much better.

Jodorowsky is in love with himself and his ideas. The guy is a bit off of his rocker and incredibly self-absorbed. He even compared what he was doing to Herbert’s work to raping your wife on your wedding night… but raping her with love. I’m serious, that’s how he saw this project.

Frankly, Lynch’s film was far from perfect but I’m glad that we got that version instead. Even if Lynch has disowned it since it came out.

As a documentary, this was really interesting, especially for fans of Dune and the fact that this was almost made in the early ’70s. If anything, it is cool hearing the tale of how this insane picture almost happened and how all the key players came together, one of which was Salvador Dali.

Rating: 8/10