Book Review: ‘Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet’ by Julian Assange, Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Muller-Maguhn & Jérémie Zimmermann

Overall, this was a pretty engaging book but it also wasn’t what I had hoped it would be, which is more of an autobiographical piece by Julian Assange, his work and his philosophy behind it all.

Instead, this reads like a conversation between four people who are talking about the cypherpunk movement.

It covers a lot of the stuff I had hoped it would but there’s that part of me that wanted something more personal and much deeper from Assange.

For those that care about this stuff, this is still most definitely a worthwhile read. Although, there probably isn’t a lot here that’s new knowledge.

However, for those who are just learning about this stuff and who didn’t live through the history of the WikiLeaks saga in real time, you’ll probably be shocked by a lot of the things that are covered here.

Regardless of your level of knowledge, though, this is definitely worth the shelf space in your library if you have an interest in tech history, freedom, conspiracies, coverups and wanting the truth to always come out.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other books about cypherpunk culture, hacking and cryptocurrency.

Book Review: ‘Kings of the Wyld’ by Nicholas Eames

I heard some good things about this book from different sources. It got me hyped up and I was really stoked to give it a read.

Initially, it lived up to expectations, as the first fifty or so pages were great. It was well written, I liked the two main characters and it hit you in the feels from the get go.

However, once they set off on their adventure, the book became tedious and tiresome.

A lot of times, the action happened off the page and was just sort of reflected on, as characters spent most of their time exchanging witticisms. Because of this, I felt like the author was leaning on the strength of his dialogue and working around his possible weaknesses.

However, after hundreds of pages of mostly banter, I couldn’t wait to get through this book.

Sure, there is action but the stuff I wanted out of this book took a backseat too often. By the time you get where you’re supposed to be going, you don’t care anymore.

This was about 500 pages. It could’ve bumped up the action and told a good, solid story in 300 pages.

I had hoped that this would be the start of a series I could’ve loved but in the end, I’ll pass on its sequels.

Rating: 5.5/10
Pairs well with: I’m assuming it’s sequel and other installments in the future, as well as other modern fantasy novels.

Book Review: ‘The Cthulhu Stories of Robert E. Howard’

I’ve always loved that H.P. Lovecraft never really gave a shit that other writers would tap into his Cthulhu mythos. In the case of Robert E. Howard, the two had become good friends whose work influenced each other. So, naturally Howard wrote some Lovecraftian tales and even merged some of his most famous characters with those existing in Lovecraft’s literary universe.

The first story in this anthology collection sees Howard’s Kull of Atlantis crossover into Lovecraftian horror. Granted, this also happened in some works featuring Conan the Cimmerian, as well.

My favorite story in the collection was the second one, which was originally a novella. The story is called “Skull-Face”. The story is about a British man who smokes opium, has weird visions and then discovers that there’s something real and sinister afoot.

As I was reading “Skull-Face”, I kept envisioning Peter Cushing as the main character and it read like something that could’ve been adapted greatly by Hammer Films in the 1960s.

The rest of the stories were also pretty solid but my mind kept drifting back to “Skull-Face”.

All in all, this was really neat to read as it merged two of my favorite fantasy authors’ worlds together. Sure, Lovecraft influenced Howard’s sword and sorcery tales but this thick volume went beyond just the stuff I’ve read involving Conan, Kull and Solomon Kane.

Rating: 7.75/10
Pairs well with: other works by Robert E. Howard, as well as the literary work of H.P. Lovecraft.

Book Review: ‘Flame and Crimson: A History of Sword-and-Sorcery’ by Brian Murphy

As a lifelong, hardcore fan of sword and sorcery fiction, this was a thoroughly enjoyable read.

Brian Murphy did his research and it showed, as this great book is probably the best thing I’ve ever read on the history of sword and sorcery fantasy, as a whole.

It’s part biographical when it covers specific writers in the genre but it also gets really deep into the history of the sword and sorcery style and how it was established and grew into quite the phenomenon that still creeps in and out of mainstream pop culture.

While this spent a good amount of time on the legendary writer, Robert E. Howard, and his most famous creations Conan and Kull, it also went way beyond that exploring other writers and their work, which helped propel sword and sorcery forward and into the hearts and minds of literary fantasy fans around the world.

The book also shows how sword and sorcery grew beyond just words on a page and how it sort of fell out of popularity but also had a resurgence, later on.

If you love sword and sorcery and you haven’t picked this book up, you definitely should. It’s something I will probably go back to and reference for years to come.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: other books about sword and sorcery literature, comics and film. Especially, the books put out by Pulp Hero Press.

Book Review: ‘A Beginner’s Guide to the Stock Market: Everything You Need to Start Making Money Today’ by Matthew R. Kratter

I really liked this book. It’s a pretty good beginner’s guide on the stock market. It’s also a short, quick read that’s packed full of a lot of info on a myriad of subjects related to starting out in stock trading game.

Matthew R. Kratter walks you through the earliest steps of getting into the market but he does so very clearly and in a way that the layman can understand.

When I first started out, I had a hard time finding beginner books that didn’t read like inside baseball. I feel like a lot of “experts” tend to use exclusionary language to either feel self-impressed or just to sell books and intimidate newbies from entering their sacred space.

Kratter’s book is one of the first I’ve come across that felt as if the author genuinely wanted to assist you and help you build knowledge and confidence to enter the stock market, ready to invest for your future.

If you aren’t trading or holding stocks and feel intimidated by the thought of it, this book is a really good starting point and pretty damn helpful.

Rating: 9/10
Pairs well with: other more recent books about the stock market, personal finance and investing.

Book Review: ‘Assassin: The Man Behind the Mask’ by Joe Hamilton & Scott Teal

I’ve definitely been digging the wrestling biographies I’ve recently gotten from Scott Teal’s website, Crowbar Press. This one is just the latest of those books that I’ve read but it lives up to the quality I’ve come to expect from the publisher.

The Assassin primarily wrestled before my time but I did get to catch the tail end of his work when I was really young. Also, he spent some time in Florida, where I grew up and still live. Because of that, I love reading books that are tied to that specific wrestling territory.

This was thoroughly enjoyable from cover-to-cover and I even liked all the stuff about his youth and growing up, as he had some issues and felt as if he needed to leave his small town behind and follow his older brother into the professional wrestling business.

I wasn’t sure what to expect going into this book, as I honestly didn’t know much about the man other than his in-ring character and all that knowledge came later, as I was a wrestling tape trader in the ’90s and early ’00s.

Like everything I’ve read from Crowbar Press, this did not disappoint and it’s a cool book for anyone that’s a fan of the old territory era of the professional wrestling business.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other books on the history of the old school territory wrestling business, as well as biographies on the personalities who lived it.

Book Review: ‘How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety and Abstinence, Drugs, Satanism, and Other Dangers That Threaten Their Nine Lives’ by The American Association of Patriots

How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety isn’t just about the subject of feline gun safety, it also talks about several difficult subjects that one might need to discuss with their cats.

The book also covers evolution, abstinence, online safety, drugs, puberty, post-apocalyptic survival and Satanism.

Since 2020 has been such a depressing, ridiculous shitshow, I’ve actually been reading more humor books. It’s becoming increasingly hard to find escapism in entertainment, so sometimes, I have to jump into the absurd.

That being said, this did its job and amused me. It’s not very long but it’s a funny, short read.

So for those needing a distraction, this will give you one for a short time.

Also, it was pretty cheap on Amazon.

Rating: 6/10
Pairs well with: other humor books about social and political issues that don’t take themselves as seriously as the people and politicians on social media.

Book Review: ‘Inside Out: How Corporate America Destroyed Professional Wrestling’ by Ole Anderson, Scott Teal

I’ve heard people reference this book for eons and I’ve heard the stories about how Ole Anderson was a cantankerous jerk but also had a great mind for the wrestling business. All of that made me want to read his book and I’m glad that I finally did.

This is both parts a biography and Ole’s view on the wrestling business and how it evolved into something much different and from his viewpoint, became un-repairable.

I liked this quite a bit. Ole is a smart guy and an opinionated one. Even if I don’t agree with every opinion, he made the case for his points-of-view really well and made his stances very clear.

Out of all the stuff I’ve read recently on old school territory wrestling, this is one of the better books.

Frankly, it made me wish that Ole was still involved in the business and it also made me wish that he’d do more shoot interviews. I loved watching the guy on my television when I was a kid and all that personality and attitude still exists.

The book shows you that the man isn’t too different from the personality that we all saw on the TV.

Rating: 7.5/10
Pairs well with: other wrestling biographies and books on the history of the business from the territory era.

Book Review: ‘Bitcoin For Beginners: Illustrated Guide To Understanding Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies’ by EverGreenPress Hub

While I used to write about economics, it was primarily about government stuff and not personal finance. Back then, everyone was raging about Bitcoin: the flashy, new kid on the scene. It was all sort of over my head, as I didn’t really understand the tech behind it all and I missed that early boat like a total dunce.

Over the years, I’ve learned more about it but never felt like I was anywhere near fully grasping Bitcoin or the cryptocurrency game in general.

This book did help me understand it quite a bit more but I can’t say that I’m super confident with my knowledge, as of yet. But I’m probably going to read beefier books on the subject in the very near future.

This book is forty-ish pages and it’s a really quick read. In fact, it was like a buck on Kindle and well worth the price for those who want to, at the very least, understand all of this on a basic level.

I found the book to be informative and to explain the whole cryptocurrency thing fairly well. However, as it says in the title, this is a book for beginners and you shouldn’t expect anything that goes into a lot of depth.

If you do have an interest in cryptocurrencies this book is definitely a decent starting point. 

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other books on cryptocurrencies and personal finance.

Book Review: ‘Memphis Wrestling History Presents: 1957-1989 Clippings’ by Mark James

This is another historical wrestling reference book by Mark James.

By it’s title you can probably gather that it focuses on the Memphis territory. While it has an introduction written by James, the rest of the book is just pages of newspaper clippings about each Monday night wrestling show held in Memphis from 1957 through 1989.

While it is fantastic that it gives the entire history of Memphis’ Monday night cards, I kind of wish that there was more information given throughout the book.

This is definitely something worth looking at, though, if you’re a fan of wrestling history, especially Memphis.

This lets you see, from week-to-week, which wrestlers were featured, who came into the territory and where they fit on the card.

Rating: 7/10
Pairs well with: other books on Memphis wrestling, as well as books by Mark James.