The Book Is FINALLY Published – Introducing ‘Dan the Destructor – Barbarians of the Storm, Book I’!

For those who have been following this site for awhile, you might already know that I wrote a graphic novel script about two years ago when all the COVID stuff was kicking off.

You might also know that I wanted to expand on the ideas and stories in that script and decided to restructure it into a pulp novel format. Well, that’s finally done!

Physical copies of the book can be purchased here. The book is also on Amazon: the Kindle version is here and the physical version is here.

However, physical books are better and since this is patterned after the pulp novels of yesteryear, I think that the physical pocket book is a lot cooler.

So what’s Dan the Destructor about? Well, here’s the blurb from the back of the book:

There have been countless legends and with that, countless heroes destined to be the “chosen one”. Dan is not that person.

Sucked into an exotic, barbarous world, Dan meets a jovial warrior and finds himself on an adventure he could’ve never imagined – battling monsters, demons, armies, and evil sorcerers.

Dan the Destructor is a mixture of sword & sorcery and post-apocalyptic B-movies presented in a quick paced pulp novel format. It’s fun, badass, fantastical, and action-packed.

Beyond that, the original idea for this concept came when I was imagining what it would be like if the ’80s Italian and Spanish rip-offs of Conan the Barbarian and The Road Warrior merged into one thing. I have always loved these sort of movies and was pretty much raised on them and all the Cannon Films action flicks. So this blends all those badass things together and tries to keep that tough as nails but awesome spirit alive.

This is also very much influenced by the pulp novels and pulp heroes I’ve read since I was a kid.

Entertainment has lost itself in recent years and its generally become an uninspiring, bleak reflection of reality. Gone are the days of adventure, fun and genuine escapism. With Dan the Destructor, I tried to bring this back.

With that, this shouldn’t be taken too seriously. I just wanted to create the book that wanted to read and I hope that other people enjoy it and that it gives them a much needed break from reality.

The novel also features a short story at the end, which tells the origin of the big villain for the book series. While that is a very dark story, I thought that it was necessary in providing the proper context for that character going into the second book in the Barbarians of the Storm series.

If people like this series, I promise not to George R.R. Martin you. I will give you your ending.

Lastly, I listen to a lot of music while writing and during the creative process, I developed a playlist that has become the unofficial soundtrack of the book for me. Honestly, all badass books deserve soundtracks and I think it helps set the tone for what to expect with the story.

Talking Pulp Update (12/6/2021): I’m Done with WordPress; The End Is Here… Well, Almost

Well, the end is here for Talking Pulp. Not exactly yet but about two months from now.

It’s been just over five years and I accomplished the goals I set out to do. Or at least the ones I could finish. But I’ve been over all that in some of the most recent site updates.

The reason why this is the end of the road is that I’m tired of WordPress’ fuckery. I hate the fucking Block Editor and want to continue to use the Classic Editor. To do that now, I have to pay $300 per year, in one lump sum, to be able to use the plugin that will allow that. This was always free until just over a year ago when they decided to strip away regular features and functions that the website has always had in an effort to force their shitty Block Editor on their customers. Among some other shitty things.

Yes, customer applies here because I’ve always given WordPress money for upgrades, domains, packages, features, etc. I paid the fucking $300, last year, simply because I hadn’t fully reached my goals with the site and I always had the plan of doing this particular site for a minimum of five years and then reevaluating on whether or not I had a reason to keep going or to move on to something else.

I’ve been using WordPress for a decade and a half. I’ve had close to a dozen different websites over the years, some of which brought in over 100K people per month.

As I type this, I loathe this Block Editor I have to use, right now. If some people prefer this trash, that’s their business. But there should still be the option between using this or the Classic Editor that doesn’t cost $300 dollars just to use a free fucking plugin. I don’t care about the other features in that $300 tier.

So with that, my posts that have been scheduled out till February 4th, 2022 will still post. After that, you’ll get what will probably be my final message.

I’m already working on other big projects that require my creative energy and writing time. Maybe, at some point, I will resurrect this all, someplace else.

 

 

Talking Pulp Update (11/19/2021): Happy 5th Anniversary to Us!

Well, it’s been five years to the day that Talking Pulp (then Cinespiria) posted its first review. Actually there were two that day: the original Django and War of the Gargantuas.

Since then, I’ve recently surpassed 5000 total posts and 2500 film reviews. Not to mention 800 comic reviews and over 200 reviews in the categories of books, video games, television shows and documentaries.

While I have always aimed for more featured articles and commentary, I’ve still produced quite a bit in that regard and have also revived relevant posts from blogs past.

Additionally, this site started with three objectives, which I have either completed or continue to work at, as not all the objectives have an actual finish line. Those original objectives were:

  1. Review every film ever featured on Mystery Science Theater 3000. – COMPLETE
  2. Review every film from every major franchise or film series that I’m interested in (and some I’m not). – MOSTLY COMPLETE, I haven’t touched Fast & Furious, the Michael Bay TransformersThe Hunger Games, Shrek or Twilight and don’t have immediate plans to because I don’t hate myself that much.
  3. Draw attention to lesser-known films that deserve more recognition. – THIS CAN NEVER BE COMPLETE, granted Hollywood’s output the last few years has primarily been atrocious.

I’m also at this point where my time is much more limited than it used to be. Month after month, I feel like this site is coming very close to its end but somehow I still manage to get out enough content to have a regular schedule and to have stuff scheduled out a month in advance and sometimes more.

However, I need to buckle down and finish one book I’ve been pushing back for some time. It’s the same project that started as a graphic novel script, roughly 18 months ago. However, I want to make it a 150-200 page pulp novel and I have lots of ideas on how I want to expand it and also, make it a series going forward.

But back to celebrating where Talking Pulp has come, thus far.

I wanted to list out the top tags in certain categories. For one, I’m curious to see what I’ve written about most and also, maybe it helps the readers of Talking Pulp realize what we’ve covered and they’ll want to search those tags themselves. And one thing I’ve prided myself on since starting this site was curating tags in a way that made it easy for the reader to cross-reference and pull things up on specific actors, directors, genres, years, notable studios, etc.

So here we go with some top ten lists of the most tagged things in their specific categories.

Film Reviews by Decades:
1. 2010s (610)
2. 1980s (572)
3. 1990s (355)
4. 1970s (296)
5. 1960s (239)
6. 2000s (238)
7. 1950s (198)
8. 1940s (146)
9. 2020s (66)
10. 1930s (36)

Film Reviews by Years:
1. 2017 (115)
2. 1987 (81)
3. 2014 (77)
4. 1986 (73)
5. 1985 (70)
6. 2016 (68)
7. 2015 (68)
8. 1988 (67)
9. 1989 (66)
10. 2019 (65)

Top Genres Reviewed:
1. action (2015)
2. sci-fi (1639)
3. adventure (1581)
4. horror (1177)
5. thriller (1018)
6. fantasy (1007)
7. drama (956)
8. crime (947)
9. comedy (767)
10. superhero (723)

Top Directors/Producers Reviewed:
1. Roger Corman (62)
2. George Lucas (47)
3. Steven Spielberg (37)
4. John Carpenter (36)
5. Dino De Laurentiis (29)
6. Joel Silver (26)
7. J. J. Abrams (23)
8. Ishirō Honda (22)
9. John Landis (22)
10. Orson Welles (20)

Top Actors:
1. Vincent Price (46)
2. Christopher Lee (46)
3. Peter Cushing (38)
4. Samuel L. Jackson (37)
5. Arnold Schwarzenegger (37)
6. Sylvester Stallone (34)
7. Dick Miller (25)
8. Johnny Depp (23)
9. Laurence Fishburne (22)
10. Simon Pegg (21)

Top Actresses:
1. Lois Maxwell (16)
2. Jamie Lee Curtis (14)
3. Mary Woronov (14)
4. Gal Gadot (13)
5. Emma Stone (13)
6. Caroline Munro (12)
7. Sigourney Weaver (12)
8. Cate Blanchett (12)
9. Mary Ellen Trainor (12)
10. Nancy Allen (11)

Top Tagged Studios:
1. Disney (240)
2. Toho (92)
3. Lucasfilm (86)
4. American International Pictures (74)
5. Hammer Films (56)
6. Cannon Films (49)
7. New World Pictures (42)
8. Toei (39)
9. Daiei (22)
10. Amicus Productions (12)

Top Tagged Franchises:
1. Marvel (546)
2. DC Comics (369)
3. G.I. Joe (84)
4. Star Wars (70)
5. Godzilla (67)
6. Conan the Barbarian (48)
7. Star Trek (40)
8. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (37)
9. Dracula (37)
10. James Bond (33)

Top Tagged Countries/Regions (other than the US):
1. UK (321)
2. Japan (203)
3. Italy (139)
4. Canada (117)
5. France (80)
6. Germany (68)
7. Spain (45)
8. Australia (40)
9. Hong Kong (35)
10. Mexico (25)

Top Tagged Comic Book Characters:
1. Batman (168)
2. Spider-Man (110)
3. Wolverine (95)
4. Captain America (90)
5. Iron Man (83)
6. The Joker (71)
7. Fantastic Four (68)
8. Nightwing (67)
9. Thor (65)
10. Superman (64)

Top Vids I Dig Sources:
1. Cartoonist Kayfabe (79)
2. The Critical Drinker (77)
3. Whang! (66)
4. Razörfist (64)
5. Filmento (55)
6. Defunctland (50)
7. Yesterworld (48)
8. Midnight’s Edge (47)
9. Toy Galaxy (36)
10. The Attic Dwellers (33)

Talking Pulp Update (10/22/2021): 5000 Posts! & Halloween Week

So it’s my 5000th post! I guess that’s a milestone and somewhat significant. It also comes about a month shy of this site’s 5th anniversary. Tomorrow also kicks off Halloween week on Talking Pulp, which will actually go for nine days!

The next week will be full of more reviews that I typically write in an entire month. That’s a lot of horror to celebrate one of my favorite times of the year!

That’s pretty much it! I hit a major milestone and I’m dropping a major amount of content!

The 30 Greatest Acting Performances In “Bad” Movies

I had the idea to compile this list after a conversation a friend and I were having about actors cast in bad movies but still giving it their all and providing those films with performances that far exceed what should have been expected.

By “bad” movies, I don’t mean films that I personally deem as bad, as I like many of them, but I mean “bad” in the way that they were looked at critically at the time of their release or how the general public views them, whether or not they’re right or wrong. Often times, I disagree with the public consensus.

Anyway, this list isn’t something that should be quantified by ranking these performances. I just wanted to list out many that I thought were damn good in spite of the popular opinion about the movie’s overall quality.

With that, many of these are obviously going to be low-budget “genre” films. Some are also probably considered “exploitation” by various people. Then some are just goofy comedies or drama movies that probably actually were crap. Point being, I’m just looking at performances here and great ones exist in everything, regardless of genre, budget or a lack of surrounding talent.

So here we go!

-Raul Julia in Street Fighter
-Frank Langella in Masters of the Universe
-Michael Fassbender in Prometheus
-Margot Robbie in Suicide Squad & Birds of Prey
-Tim Roth in Planet of the Apes 2001.
-Josh Brolin in W Jonah Hex
-Tobin Bell in the Saw sequels
-Eva Green in Dark Shadows
-Stephen Lang in a lot of his films
-Michael Parks in Tusk
-Viola Davis in a lot
-William Fichtner in Drive Angry & What’s The Worst That Could Happen
-Thomas Haden Church in Spider-Man 3
-Jasmine Guy in Harlem Nights
-Tim Curry in It
-Ben Affleck as Batman
-Bill Moseley in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2
-Walter Matthau in Dennis the Menace
-R. Lee Ermey in Saving Silverman
-Jeremy Irons in Dungeons & Dragons
-Martin Landau in Ready to Rumble
-Octavia Spencer in a lot
-Matthew McConaughey in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 4
-Will Smith in Suicide Squad
-Henry Cavill as Superman
-Charles Dance in Last Action Hero
-Eddie Redmayne in Jupiter Ascending
-Alan Rickman in CBGB
-Christopher Lee in a lot
-The ENTIRE cast of the Hobbit trilogy

If there are some that you think I missed, please feel free to list and discuss in the comments.

Talking Pulp Update (9/13/2021): Halloween Week and Thereafter

It’s been a really long time since I’ve posted a site update but I’ve been really ahead on content and the posts I’m writing are scheduled out about a month and a half into the future. Because of that, I lost track of time in regards to what I was scheduling and almost shot passed October without acknowledging the greatest month for horror movies.

So instead of my Halloween celebration, which typically goes on for several weeks, I’m going to be condensing a lot of content to the week of Halloween. Since it falls on a Sunday, I will have posts and reviews that weekend, the previous week and the previous weekend that are horror-centric. I’m also doubling down on the typical level of output, so it will be a week packed full of good shit.

Beyond Halloween, we come to Talking Pulp’s 5th Anniversary at the end of November. I’m also approaching 5000 posts and that’s a pretty significant milestone. I’m not sure what I’m going to do yet for that milestone and and upcoming anniversary. However, things may be pretty bleak going forward.

It seems like every year, leading into the final quarter, I start to think about ending this site. Well, I’m now leaning towards that decision stronger than ever.

For one, I already accomplished the goals I set out to accomplish when I first started Talking Pulp, as Cinespiria, back in 2016. So to be frank, I’m less enthused about putting as much work into this as I have for the past half decade.

Additionally, in the modern world, people seem to read less… a lot less. While subscribers and new readers grow, total visits and engagement have tanked. In fact, I used to get a comment or two on every post in the early days, when I got shit for traffic. Now, it’s been months since anyone has commented on anything.

While my mind is not 100 percent made up on this or when I would actually step away, I feel like the end is nigh.

Although, I don’t think I’d just pull the plug and nuke everything. I will most likely leave the site up and at some point, maybe I’ll have the urge to bring it back, full steam. Or, I may just post periodically when I see a new movie or read a new comic that I feel like I need to talk about or put a spotlight on.

I guess we’ll see in the next few months. But for those that still read this site regularly, I figured I’d give you all the heads up.

Ranking All the Movies Shown (Thus Far) on ‘The Last Drive-In with Joe Bob Briggs’ – UPDATED (After Season 3)

*Intro originally written after Season 1. Total movie count changed though.

Joe Bob Briggs is one of the most important Americans that ever walked God’s green Earth. In fact, he’s probably the greatest Texan that ever lived and that’s a huge state with a lot of history.

So when I heard that Joe Bob was coming back with a new show, I was ecstatic. But if you’re a loyal reader of Talking Pulp (and its original form: Cinespiria) then you already know this.

But it’s already been about a year and Joe Bob, thanks to the wonderful people at Shudder, has provided us with three marathons and a full season of The Last Drive-In.

Also, I have to give a special shout out to Darcy the Mail Girl, who is super fucking cool to the fans and because of this, breaks Twitter every Friday night.

With all that being said, I wanted to rank all 91 films that have been featured on The Last Drive-In (thus far).

These 91 motion pictures are ranked based off of what they were rated in their reviews here on Talking Pulp.

So without further ado, roll that beautiful scream footage!

1. Black Christmas (9.5 out of 10)
2. Phantasm (9 out of 10)
3. Hellraiser (9 out of 10)
4. The Changeling (9 out of 10)
5. Hellbound: Hellraiser II (8.75 out of 10)
6. The Exorcist III (8.75 out of 10)
7. The House of the Devil (8.75 out of 10)
8. Bride of Re-Animator (8.25 out of 10)
9. Heathers (8.25 out of 10)
10. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (8.25 out of 10)
11. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (8 out of 10)
12. Demons (8 out of 10)
13. Deep Red (8 out of 10)
14. Train to Busan (8 out of 10)
15. The Love Witch (8 out of 10)
16. Basket Case (8 out of 10)
17. Class of 1984 (7.75 out of 10)
18. Evilspeak (7.75 out of 10)
19. Brain Damage (7.75 out of 10)
20. Re-Animator (7.5 out of 10)
21. Next of Kin (7.5 out of 10)
22. Day of the Beast (7.5 out of 10)
23. Mandy (7.5 out of 10)
24. Haunt (7.5 out of 10)
25. Chopping Mall (7.5 out of 10)
26. Fried Barry (7.5 out of 10)
27. Halloween (7.25 out of 10)
28. Maniac (7.25 out of 10)
29. Dead & Buried (7.25 out of 10)
30. Society (7.25 out of 10)
31. Sleepaway Camp (7 out of 10)
32. The Stuff (7 out of 10)
33. Blood Rage (7 out of 10)
34. Pieces (7 out of 10)
35. Maniac Cop 2 (7 out of 10)
36. Rabid (7 out of 10)
37. Audition (6.75 out of 10)
38. Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (6.75 out of 10)
39. Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (6.75 out of 10)
40. Silent Night, Deadly Night, Part 2 (6.75 out of 10)
41. Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (6.5 out of 10)
42. Little Shop of Horrors (6.5 out of 10)
43. Tammy & the T-Rex (6.5 out of 10)
44. Dead Heat (6.5 out of 10)
45. The Prowler (6.5 out of 10)
46. Humanoids From the Deep (6.25 out of 10)
47. Wolf Guy (6.25 out of 10)
48. Q: The Winged Serpent (6.25 out of 10)
49. Maniac Cop (6 out of 10)
50. Victor Crowley (6 out of 10)
51. One Cut of the Dead (6 out of 10)
52. The House by the Cemetery (6 out of 10)
53. Bloodsucking Freaks (6 out of 10)
54. Deadly Games (6 out of 10)
55. Mother’s Day (6 out of 10)
56. Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers (6 out of 10)
57. WolfCop (6 out of 10)
58. Deathgasm (5.75 out of 10)
59. Christmas Evil (5.75 out of 10)
60. Sorority Babes In the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (5.75 out of 10)
61. Phantasm IV: Oblivion (5.5 out of 10)
62. Daughters of Darkness (5.5 out of 10)
63. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (5.5 out of 10)
64. Contamination (5.5 out of 10)
65. Slumber Party Massacre II (5.5 out of 10)
66. Troma’s War (5.5 out of 10)
67. Street Trash (5.25 out of 10)
68. The Hills Have Eyes (5.25 out of 10)
69. Phantasm: Ravager (5 out of 10)
70. C.H.U.D. (5 out of 10)
71. Blood Harvest (4.75 out of 10)
72. Ginger Snaps (4.5 out of 10)
73. Hell Comes to Frogtown (4.5 out of 10)
74. Spookies (4.5 out of 10)
75. The Legend of Boggy Creek (4.5 out of 10)
76. Dead or Alive (4.25 out of 10)
77. Castle Freak (4 out of 10)
78. Demon Wind (4 out of 10)
79. Mayhem (3.5 out of 10)
80. Hack-O-Lantern (3.5 out of 10)
81. Tourist Trap (3 out of 10)
82. Cannibal Holocaust (3 out of 10)
83. Scare Package (3 out of 10)
84. Blood Feast (3 out of 10)
85. Sledgehammer (2.75 out of 10)
86. Hogzilla (2.5 out of 10)
87. Deadbeat at Dawn (2.5 out of 10)
88. Jack Frost (2.25 out of 10)
89. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (2 out of 10)
90. Madman (2 out of 10)
91. Things (0 out of 10)

Talking Pulp Update (3/9/2021): A Bit More Content Coming

I haven’t given an update in awhile, which I guess means that things have been going fairly smoothly.

However, I did cut back the content output at the beginning of the year due to being overworked and burnt out in my real job. Also, time was really scarce and I was working on some other things but also trying to take it easy.

I’m now way ahead on scheduling content. It’s early March but I have posts already written and scheduled out into the first week of May.

Because of that, I feel like I have a bit of a time buffer. So I’m going to bring back weekend posts starting on May 1st. I want to use Saturdays and Sundays to add in some extra film reviews and Vids I Dig posts. I think the general plan for the weekend reviews will just be me trying to work through my multiple streaming queues that have had films languishing there for years.

We’ve all got those movies floating around at the bottom of our queue barrels and it’s way past time that I work towards clearing them out.

Plus, I also have multiple lists I’ve compiled of films I need to cover for Talking Pulp. Between my multiple queues and these expansive lists, I’ve got several hundred if not well over a thousand motion pictures to work through. It’s a huge task and the lists will always grow but I never thought I’d have written 4500 posts/3600 reviews in under five years either.

Ideally, I wish that I could go back to publishing four-to-five posts per day like I was doing at this site’s peak but that’ll just lead to me crashing and burning again.

I need time for the real job, my side hustles and I have a book I need to work on, which I’m passionate about and overwhelmed by at the same time.

Anyway, that’s it for now. Expect weekend posting to return on Saturday, May 1st.

Retro Relapse: The Impact of Goonery On the Modern Game

RETRO RELAPSE is a series of older articles from various places where I used to write before Talking Pulp.

*Written in 2016.

At this point, everyone should be aware of the Dennis Wideman incident from the other night.

If you aren’t, in a nutshell, he took a hard hit, which was missed by the refs. He responded by violently knocking down linesman Don Henderson. Now while Wideman says it wasn’t intentional, the video evidence is pretty damning. And whether or not he was dazed and meant to hit an opposing player, he still struck a referee and it was still a massive illegal hit even if he did strike a player.

Between this incident by the Calgary Flames, often times aggressive, defenseman and the recent sucker punch thrown by the Los Angeles Kings’ Milan Lucic, which also hit a ref, there has been a recent trend of Slap Shot style goonery.

The thing is, Slap Shot is a slapstick comedy movie and it is also about 40 years old. The NHL isn’t a backyard wrestling federation and has evolved significantly since those days. But some players still seem to draw inspiration from the fictional Hanson Bros. and the Charlestown Chiefs.

And sure, all the hockey purists, myself included, love a certain level of aggression in the sport. I will always defend fighting as part of the sport’s tradition and heritage. I’ve also seen the negative effects of what happens when you don’t allow fighting in hockey by witnessing ridiculous hits in the college and junior levels of the game where players have no real outlet to blow off steam other than smashing a guy into the boards more violently than necessary.

That is the point of fighting. It is to blow off steam or to let two men on the ice settle their beef with a bit of gentlemanly fisticuffs instead of an all out war on the human bodies of everyone in their vicinity.

At the end of the day, however, you never, ever hit an official.

But everything I am saying here is agreed upon by most, except for Neanderthals and pacifists.

I fully support the hefty suspension on Wideman and I think most people do. In fact, I may even say that it is too light. But that is up to the League to decide and they have.

If the NHL doesn’t make examples out of guys like Wideman and Lucic, things like this will become more commonplace. If that were to happen, there’d be a lot more push back by those opposed to hockey violence. More of these situations would add credibility to their argument. And even though these incidents aren’t true examples of what fighting in hockey is, it won’t matter. If the game is perceived as too violent, it is only a matter of time before the NHL has to crackdown.

If the NHL does feel as if its hand is forced to crackdown, we are looking at a league without fighting or a very diet form of fighting. The effects of that will create more violence in how the game is played on the ice. There will be harder hits and more injuries. This will have a bigger negative impact on the sport and be truly counterproductive to the solution pushed forward by those with these biases and criticisms. It’s like politics, some big change is born with good intentions but finds itself plagued by unintended consequences. Although, it doesn’t take a genius to see the writing on the wall.

The game is already evolving away from fighting anyway. I think it will always exist, to a degree, unless it is completely banned. But the old school giant goon of yesteryear is having a much harder time finding a job in the modern NHL. Teams would rather fill their rosters spots with snipers and d-men that can actually play defense. Also, the game is getting faster each year and big thugs can’t keep up with the action. And all this is reflected in the fact that fights have been decreasing each year.

Unfortunate things happen in hockey but it’s the same in all sports. Regardless, if it is caused by a few knuckleheaded individuals doesn’t matter to the busybodies. And that is why examples have to be made.

I just hope other players learn from incidents like these and have more respect for the game, their livelihood, the players and the officials on the ice.

Retro Relapse: Making ‘May Madness’ A Thing

RETRO RELAPSE is a series of older articles from various places where I used to write before Talking Pulp.

*Written in 2015.

May Madness! Or should it be June Madness? Or maybe May-to-June Madness, as it plays out in two different months? Well, it starts at the end of May and goes into the end of June, so most games are played in June.

Regardless of what to officially call it, I love the NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament, which culminates into the College World Series. In fact, I love it in the same way that I love March Madness a.k.a. the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament (I like the Women’s one too and the NIT Tournament).

The thing is, every time March rolls around, people all over America print their brackets, fill them out and duke it out with their friends over who knows the sport best. Truthfully, most people only watch the sport during March Madness and really don’t know as much as they think they do. But that is the cool thing about it, playing some stupid bracket game sparks a lot of interest in college basketball: ratings soar and everyone is glued to the television come Final Four time. College baseball could certainly use a similar spark and people could use some good summertime fun.

The thing that makes March Madness so exciting is the insane amount of teams that are in the tournament. College baseball is similar in that there are 64 teams in their tournament (out of 298 Division I programs), the same amount as the basketball tournament before they expanded it to 68 just a few years ago (a change I still don’t get). Additionally, like the basketball tournament, the conference winners get automatic bids and the rest of the field is selected by an NCAA committee.

However, there are a few things that make the baseball tournament different than the basketball tournament.

In March Madness, the basketball teams play in a “one and done” scenario. You lose once, you’re out of the tournament and that’s it. In the baseball tournament, it is a bit more complicated although more interesting.

In college baseball, teams don’t find themselves in a “one and done” situation. They are divided into sixteen regional brackets with a double-elimination format. Regional champions then face each other in eight Super Regionals. The eight winners of those contests then go on to be the participants in the College World Series, which is essentially baseball’s version of basketball’s Final Four, except there are eight teams instead of four.

In the College World Series, teams are split into two groups of four and play a double-elimination format. When it gets down to the final four teams, they play in a best of three series in the semifinals and finals.

It is harder for the average Joe to follow but those of us who follow collegiate baseball, don’t find it that difficult and like the fact that it is a more complex playoff system. Although, it isn’t perfect and for the betterment of the sport, I’m not opposed to some changes to make it more accessible to the masses. Besides, with more accessibility comes more viewership and hopefully, a lot more excitement which will only better the sport of baseball at the collegiate level.

The “one and done” style of college basketball and the large number of participants is what makes it really unpredictable and exciting. Upsets happen on a pretty frequent basis but no one seems to have a problem with the system, as it is. Well, the vast majority of people, anyway.

College baseball could benefit from getting rid of the double-elimination format and go for a straight up 64 team bracket. However, to make it more balanced to what currently exists, I would propose making each round a best of three series, which would still require a double-elimination (or two-loss) scenario.

Where this would make May Madness more exciting than March Madness is that people filling out their brackets could have the option of picking the winner and the amount of games played – a good way to determine tiebreakers.

I’d also like to see the baseball Final Four expand to at least a best of five series: seven would be better.

I’m just a fan of college baseball and a fan of March Madness and think that the energy surrounding the NCAA Basketball Tournament could carry over to another great sport with a similar playoff system already in play. Besides, it’s not like you can do this with college football, which just started a playoff system that is only comprised of four teams. And I love NCAA hockey but they don’t have enough teams to have anything bigger than a sixteen team tournament.

College baseball is the only thing that could provide the world with a proper spin-off of the mega successful March Madness monster. Besides, what else is going on in sports this time of year? Football, hockey and basketball are in their off season and Major League Baseball is in the long drawn out middle of their regular season: gearing up for a joke of an All-Star Game.

Well, I guess I’ll watch the third and final game of the College World Series tonight and continue to dream of a sport that could grow much larger and potentially open the doors of bracketology pandemonium during the summer.