Film Review: Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves (1997)

Release Date: March 18th, 1997
Directed by: Dean Cundey
Written by: Karey Kirkpatrick, Nell Scovell, Joel Hodgson
Based on: characters by Stuart Gordon, Brian Yuzna, Ed Naha
Music by: Michael Tavera
Cast: Rick Moranis, Eve Gordon, Bug Hall, Robin Bartlett, Stuart Pankin, Allison Mack, Jake Richardson, Mila Kunis

Walt Disney Pictures, 74 Minutes

Review:

“Baseball’s just a phase, it’ll pass. But science is always cool.” – Wayne Szalinski

As bad as Honey, I Blew Up the Kid was, I assumed that this would be absolutely terrible. However, I was kind of surprised by it.

No, it’s not as good as the original film but it was still amusing and kind of charming.

I found it kind of weird that Marcia Strassman wasn’t in this but after the second film, I can’t blame her. But Eve Gordon, who takes over the role of Wayne’s wife, did a better than decent job and had okay chemistry with Moranis.

I also found the other two adults in the story, Stuart Pankin and Robin Bartlett, to be pretty good. I’ve always liked Pankin and I’ll always have a soft spot for Bartlett, who I most remember for that Richard Grieco starring spy spoof If Looks Could Kill. Man, that film’s been lost to the sands of time. I’d like to review it but I’ve never seen it streaming anywhere.

Getting back to this movie, I’m glad that they shrunk characters down again and got back to what made the first film cool and unique. I also like that they shrunk the adults this time, as it at least doesn’t give us a lazy rehash of the original.

My only real complaint about the film is that the adults never go outside. One of the things that made the first film so cool was seeing a normal backyard from the perspective of an insect. In this film, everything happens within the house but considering that this was a movie made specifically to be released on home video, they didn’t have the budget to replicate the oversized outside world.

That doesn’t mean that the shrunken characters don’t have threats to deal with, they certainly do. The worst of them being a cockroach that is about the size of a large horse when compared to the scaled down protagonists.

For the majority of the film, the parents are trying to get their kids’ attention. However, the kids are busy having a house party and are just happy that their parents are nowhere to be found.

For what this is, the special effects and overall production were pretty well done. Sure, some things look dated and it’s obvious that this wasn’t intended for the big screen but you still get lost in the oversized world and buy into the premise.

In the end, this isn’t half bad and it’s better than other straight-to-video releases of the time.

Rating: 5.25/10
Pairs well with: the other two films in this series.

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