Film Review: The Horror of Frankenstein (1970)

Release Date: November 8th, 1970 (UK)
Directed by: Jimmy Sangster
Written by: Jeremy Burnham, Jimmy Sangster
Based on: characters by Mary Shelley
Music by: Malcolm Williamson
Cast: Ralph Bates, Kate O’Mara, Veronica Carlson, David Prowse

EMI Films, Hammer Films, 95 Minutes

Review:

“I’m going to make a person!” – Victor Frankenstein

It seems like Hammer fans are split on this movie. Many seem to dig it’s somewhat fresh and slightly more tongue and cheek take on Frankenstein while others outright hate it and think it was a failure that missed its mark.

I’m on the side of liking it but I also just find it entertaining and amusing and I’m not wholly in love with it.

What works for me is Ralph Bates. He’s good in this and it’s cool seeing him get his chance to actually star in a Hammer horror film, as opposed to just being a supporting player or low tier villain. I think that his humor comes through and even with how subtle he is about it, his timing and facial expressions are impeccable.

Bates’ performance is a bit understated and it works for me but I can see how it doesn’t resonate with many Hammer fans, who might not enjoy his sort of dry wit.

I also like that David Prowse got to play this film’s version of the Monster, as he’s a good physical actor that can convey a lot without seeming like he’s doing much at all. I wouldn’t call his performance as good as it was in Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell or the original Star Wars trilogy, where he was Darth Vader, but he actually creates a version of the monster that feels unpredictable and legitimately dangerous.

Additionally, we get the enchanting Veronica Carlson, who is sweet and looks like a million bucks. Add in Kate O’Mara and you’ve got a solid, well-rounded cast. Some people may know O’Mara as The Rani from the Tom Baker years on Doctor Who.

The plot sort of reboots 1957’s The Curse of Frankenstein. It’s nowhere near as good as that movie but it’s still interesting seeing another team get to tackle the material while still having this visually fit within the Hammer style. But ultimately, this wasn’t as successful as Hammer had hoped, as it didn’t get a sequel and the studio went back to making more movies with Peter Cushing as Victor Frankenstein.

Rating: 6.5/10
Pairs well with: other Hammer Frankenstein films, as well as the Hammer Dracula and Mummy series.

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