Film Review: Gilda (1946)

Release Date: March 14th, 1946 (New York City premiere)
Directed by: Charles Vidor
Written by: Jo Eisinger, Marion Parsonnet, Ben Hecht (uncredited), E.A. Ellington
Music by: M.W. Stoloff, Marlin Skiles
Cast: Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford, George Macready, Joseph Calleia

Columbia Pictures, 110 Minutes

Review:

“Hate is a very exciting emotion. Haven’t you noticed? Very exciting. I hate you too, Johnny. I hate you so much I think I’m going to die from it. Darling… [they kiss passionately] I think I’m going to die from it.” – Gilda

Out of all the film-noir classics I’ve watched and reviewed over the last few years, Gilda was low on my radar, even if it is beloved by many and considered a top noir.

I’m not sure why I wasn’t in a rush to see this one, as I like Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford, but I do tend to be more attracted to intense crime thriller noir.

This does have a crime thriller element, more than I anticipated, actually, but it is mostly focused on drama and romance, as two ex-lovers who are still in love try their damnedest to try and hurt each other.

There really isn’t a likable character in this film, if you look past the charm and beauty of Hayworth. She acts shitty, Glenn Ford acts shitty and no one else is that great either.

I have to say, though, I was surprised by a rather shocking twist at the very end. I didn’t see it coming and it was jarring in a good way. However, that twist was quickly dealt with and a solid swerve immediately went out with a somewhat underwhelming whimper.

Directed by Charles Vidor, the film’s overall composition looked splendid.

This boasts great cinematography even for the high standard that was set during the height of film-noir. It’s a superb looking picture with magnificent shot framing, incredible lighting and a lush tropical setting that feels both lived in and opulent.

I was mostly pleasantly surprised by this. Sure, it may have been a bit slow, here and there, but it makes up for the lack of narrative energy in how energetic the performances are by the two leads.

Rating: 7.25/10
Pairs well with: other classic noir pictures like Laura, The Lady From Shanghai, The Killers and The Postman Always Rings Twice.