Talking Pulp Wrasslin’: Reflecting On NWA Into the Fire

It’s been a few days since the National Wrestling Alliance’s Into the Fire pay-per-view. I tried to go to the event live but I had issues with my Internet when tickets went on sale and they sold out too fast for me to get my hands on a few. Since this event took place on my birthday, I thought that I’d make it an awesome present for myself but alas, I had to watch it on television through the Fite app on my FireStick.

I also didn’t see this live, as my friends took me out for my birthday. Instead, I watched this Sunday morning while nursing my hangover. Unfortunately, the surprise of Marty Scurll’s shocking debut was spoiled for me thanks to Twitter.

Overall, I thought Into the Fire, my first modern National Wrestling Alliance pay-per-view, was good enough to keep newer fans interested but it lacked in some areas that I want to discuss. So I guess this is kind of a review of it, even though the article isn’t labeled as such because I don’t typically review wrestling shows on Talking Pulp – although that might change.

To start, my biggest gripe about the show was match length. Every match, even the main event, which ran the longest, felt like they flew by too quickly. When I looked up what the actual match length times were, the first five matches ran between 4:15 to 9:16. The two longest matches clocked in at 12:20 and 22:00. For a two and a half hour show, these run times seem pretty scant and frankly, the matches, most of which were good albeit green in spots, felt like flashes in the pan.

Additionally, I wasn’t crazy about the pay-per-view being broadcast from the TV studio where they film Power. The main reason is the look of it. I felt like the show should have had its own distinct aesthetic to set it apart and make it feel special or next level. Granted, this could’ve been simply achieved by using different colored curtains or modified sets. I know that stuff costs money and the National Wrestling Alliance isn’t a financial juggernaut like WWE (or even AEW) but I felt like more effort should’ve been made there.

Or they could’ve moved it to a small arena in the Atlanta area. I don’t think that the promotion can sell out a decent sized arena in 2019 but even a nice hall or something like what ECW used to run shows in back in the late ’90s. Hopefully, as the NWA grows, and I sincerely hope it does, this will be something that they can do in the future. Working in marketing for nearly two decades, I think it’s important to brand the pay-per-views differently than the weekly show. As I’ve said, it can be achieved with just some minor tweaks to the studio.

I understand the concept that the episodes of NWA Power between the pay-per-views are being looked at as “seasons” with the pay-per-views themselves being looked at as “season finales” but I still think they need to differentiate them, as Into the Fire felt more like an extended episode of Power than it did a flagship event. While I’ll watch these events, regardless, I’m thinking more about making the NWA appeal to a larger audience. If you’re in business, it should be to make money. To make the most money, you have to try and appeal to the largest audience possible.

Moving on, I thought that the action in most of the matches was good. Some of the younger talent still need to refine their in-ring work but I’m not going to call out anyone specifically, as the end result was still a good show and I think that the talent is only going to improve, especially with the guidance of some of the veterans on the roster. I hope guys like Nick Aldis, James Storm, Tim Storm, Trevor Murdoch, Ken Anderson, Aron Stevens and Colt Cabana are allowing the younger stars the ability to come to them for advice.

Out of all the matches, the one I most enjoyed was the main event, two out of three falls match between NWA champion Nick Aldis and solid veteran James Storm. They put on a good match, had solid chemistry and the inclusion of Tim Storm into the story as one of the referees was a nice touch and a nice rub for a guy that doesn’t get the fanfare that I feel he deserves.

Ultimately, the high point of the entire show was the last few minutes that saw Marty Scurll, now a free agent after his time in Ring of Honor, show up to confront Nick Aldis. Obviously, this is to set up a big feud for the NWA Worlds Heavyweight Championship that will most likely be the main event of the next big pay-per-view.

It’s damn cool to see Scurll show up and show the NWA some love. I’m assuming he is off to All Elite Wrestling in the near future, as that promotion was established by his good friends, but his presence in the NWA only helps it, even if it is just temporary.

The National Wrestling Alliance is off to a decent start, looking at this as the first pay-per-view that their newly acquired audience has seen. I hope the buyrates were solid and that it helps keep the NWA going strong, as they film more episodes of Power and build towards the next flagship show.

It’s also worth mentioning that the Television Title is coming back and will be contested for at a pay-per-view in late January. But I guess I’ll have to wait for this week’s episode of Power to find out more. And maybe I can get tickets to that show.

Lastly, I really liked Stu Bennett (formerly WWE’s Wade Barrett or Bad News Barrett) on commentary. The voice of Jim Cornette will be missed but Bennett has the chops and did a superb job calling the action.

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