Film Review: The Creeping Terror (1964)

Also known as: The Crawling Monster (working title)
Release Date: 1964
Directed by: Vic Savage (as A. J. Nelson)
Written by: Robert Silliphant
Music by: Frederick Kopp
Cast: Vic Savage, Shannon O’Neil, William Thourlby, John Caresio, Larry Burrell (narrator)

Metropolitan International Pictures, Crown International Pictures, 77 Minutes

Review:

“That afternoon, in Mungreeve Park, a group of neighbors got together for a hoot-e-nanny.” – Narrator

Mystery Science Theater 3000 has shown a lot of schlock-y monster movies in its 200-plus episode run. I have to say, though, this one might be the absolute worst of the lot.

This movie features a monster that is basically a giant rubber slug that looks like it’s got giant noodles dangling off of it. It’s terrible, uninspiring and is just a ripoff of The Blob without the imagination or any real attempt at trying to create actual dread in the audience.

The biggest sequence in the film is just cuts back and forth of teens go-go dancing and the creature crawling extremely slow through the dirt and shrubs. Eventually it gets to the dance to chow down on teens but the fact that it can even catch a person is an amazing feat, truly.

I guess the monsters, as there are actually two, are some organic space probes sent to Earth to eat and digest humans for analysis. So somehow destroying some super computer at the end somehow halts a potential invasion. This movie was a mess and mostly just a confusing bore that felt like it was written by a couple of burnouts after smoking all the pot in town over the course of a 24 hour Roger Corman movie bender.

Unlike Corman, however, this film had no charm and it’s monster looked like a shredded semi tire from the highway, tied to puppet strings that some drunkard was shaking above the shot. At least Corman gave us hokey monsters we could love.

This is literal cinematic poop. But it’s still a watchable film if seen with the aid of Mike Nelson and The ‘Bots.

Rating: 1.5/10
Pairs well with: other monster schlock of the ’50s and ’60s, especially the monster movies shown on MST3K.