Talking Pulp: Rotten Tomatoes Has Always Been Rotten

Everyone and their mother seems to be outraged by this Rotten Tomatoes controversy of the past 24 hours. Everyone has written an article or done a video on it and I figured I’d stay out of it because it’s monopolizing my social media feeds.

However, I have a different perspective on it because where people seem to be surprised and offended by their bullshit shenanigans the last few days, I never relied on the website or took it too seriously to begin with.

Rotten Tomatoes was never about audience participation, it’s always been about using an unclear, bullshitty algorithm to give unreliable scores to movies that do nothing but benefit the big studio system’s marketing machine. This wasn’t a secret, they’ve been shilling for their corporate masters since the Clinton administration. While it may have started with noble intentions in 1998, I can’t remember a time where I ever saw Rotten Tomatoes as relevant and I was using their built-in proto-social media platform back in 2001 or so.

People have been asking where they can go now, since Rotten Tomatoes has silenced anyone that isn’t approved by them to be a film reviewer. I’ve always found IMDb to be the most reliable source for how good a movie is. More often than not, IMDb ratings line up with my feeling on a movie. For those that don’t know, IMDb’s score is solely comprised by the audience. Anyone can vote on a film’s rating and millions already have. In fact, more people have voted on films on IMDb than they ever have on Rotten Tomatoes.

Now that’s not to say that IMDb won’t throw us a curveball in the future, as more and more tech industry companies continue to control speech. But, for now, it’s a better source and it always has been. Plus, the website doesn’t look like it was designed by a Nickelodeon intern. It’s basic, informational and straight to the point. Although those video ads that expand on your page are a pain in the dick.

Rotten Tomatoes doesn’t give you an accurate rating. They control who can be considered a legit critic and then they reduce in-depth critical analysis down to a binary result: did the critic like it or not like it. So if a bunch of critics think a film was a 6 out of 10, Rotten Tomatoes calculates that as a like. So when likes equate to 100 percent and dislikes equate to 0 percent, you can end up with a film getting a 98 percent approval rating even if most of the critics only thought it was a 6 out of 10.

So it’s not like they’ve been honest or given us accurate numbers, anyway. The only reason they are as big as they have gotten is because they have a simple logo that is easy for Hollywood marketing firms to throw on posters and into TV spots the day before a film drops. So by smooching that Hollywood ball sack, Rotten Tomatoes gets their own free marketing, gets considered relevant by casual filmgoers and then just increases their power and hold on the industry.

Additionally, Rotten Tomatoes is owned by Fandango, who are owned by NBC Universal (70 percent) and Warner Bros. (30 percent). So if it is under the umbrella of two massive film studios, why wouldn’t they build up their own propaganda machine in an effort to convince people that Rotten Tomatoes means something?

Now on the flip side, IMDb is owned by Amazon. While Amazon has its own studio, it has a much more neutral position within Hollywood. Plus, IMDb continues to use a ratings system that is controlled by the people and not some vague, complicated aggregator.

But what most people are upset about is that Rotten Tomatoes has taken their voice away. But even the audience scores have been found to be skewed, as Rotten Tomatoes won’t calculate in audience scores that are zero stars. And this has been known for awhile.

Frankly, Rotten Tomatoes is disingenuous, it doesn’t give a fuck what you think and it’s only purpose is to shill.

So I’m glad that they took a giant misstep and have now made more people aware of just how full of crap they are.

In the end, you can just come to TalkingPulp.com and I won’t steer you wrong. Unless you have really poor taste. But then again, I also don’t go to the movies too often anymore because people forgot how to behave in a theater and I’m usually seeing red instead of the movie I paid to watch.

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